Historic infrastructure – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 18:43:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://preservethenati.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/nati.png Historic infrastructure – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ 32 32 Plumbing Manufacturers International Applauds Signing of Historic Infrastructure Investment Program https://preservethenati.org/plumbing-manufacturers-international-applauds-signing-of-historic-infrastructure-investment-program/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 17:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/plumbing-manufacturers-international-applauds-signing-of-historic-infrastructure-investment-program/ WASHINGTON–(COMMERCIAL THREAD) – Plumbing Manufacturers International (PMI) congratulates Congress on coming together to adopt the historic, bipartisan infrastructure package, which was enacted by President Joe Biden yesterday. PMI CEO / Executive Director Kerry Stackpole said PMI welcomes the passage of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA), HR 3684, the country’s largest infrastructure investment in […]]]>

WASHINGTON–(COMMERCIAL THREAD) – Plumbing Manufacturers International (PMI) congratulates Congress on coming together to adopt the historic, bipartisan infrastructure package, which was enacted by President Joe Biden yesterday.

PMI CEO / Executive Director Kerry Stackpole said PMI welcomes the passage of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA), HR 3684, the country’s largest infrastructure investment in decades. “The law sets in motion critical steps to modernize our country’s aging infrastructure and includes significant investments in our drinking water supply and sanitation systems,” Stackpole said. “Investing and modernizing our country’s infrastructure is essential to the country’s long-term economic growth and will significantly improve access to clean water and improved sanitation.

The IIJA makes generational investments of over $ 550 billion in new spending for priorities such as water infrastructure, roads, highways, bridges, ports, airports, railways, public transportation. common, pollution mitigation, as well as power grid upgrade, broadband, cybersecurity, and more.

The water infrastructure portion of the package includes more than $ 50 billion in funding for rural towns, as well as for Native American and underserved communities. PMI advocated for funding water efficiency, water conservation and reuse from the law, as well as significant improvements to water supply and wastewater systems to be covered. by law, in particular:

  • $ 48.4 billion over five years for spending on drinking water and wastewater.

  • $ 15 billion to support the replacement of main service lines.

  • Funding of $ 200 million to fight lead testing and sanitation in drinking water systems in schools and daycares.

  • $ 48 million for national water reuse programs and $ 1 billion for funding Western water reuse programs. It also creates an interagency working group on water reuse.

  • $ 400 million for water efficiency in western states through the Bureau of Reclamation’s Water Smart Grants Program.

  • $ 10 billion to help drinking water and sanitation systems tackle emerging contaminants like PFAS and to enable the purchase of certified point-of-entry or point-of-use filters and filtrations that will help to remove harmful contaminants from drinking water.

  • $ 3.5 billion for the construction of new sanitation facilities for Native American communities, including water, sewage and solid waste systems.

PMI thanks all the legislators in the House and Senate who voted for this vast array of infrastructure. “We look forward to the implementation of the IIJA, which will support major public works projects for the most needy water supply systems and provide jobs and economic growth at a critical time,” Stackpole said. . “We commend President Biden for his efforts to make better reconstruction and infrastructure renewal the centerpiece of his administration’s first year in office. ”

About Plumbing Manufacturers International

Plumbing Manufacturers International (PMI) is the trade association of plumbing product manufacturers that produce over 90% of plumbing products in the United States, represent over 150 iconic brands, and develop safe, reliable and innovative plumbing technologies that are economical. in water. PMI members contribute more than 464,000 jobs and an $ 85.5 billion economic impact on the US economy.

With a vision of safe and responsible plumbing – always, PMI advocates the performance of plumbing products contributing to water efficiency and savings, sustainability, public health and safety, and consumer satisfaction. PMI members manufacture water-efficient toilets, urinals, faucets, shower heads and other products at more than 70 locations across the country and market them online and in more than 24,000 home improvement stores , hardware stores and showrooms in all 50 states. For more information on PMI, contact the organization at 1750 Tysons Blvd., Ste. 1500, McLean, Virginia, 22102; Phone. : 847-481-5500. www.safeplumbing.org


Source link

]]>
Investing in Historic Infrastructure to Benefit Native Americans in Three Key Ways https://preservethenati.org/investing-in-historic-infrastructure-to-benefit-native-americans-in-three-key-ways/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 12:47:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/investing-in-historic-infrastructure-to-benefit-native-americans-in-three-key-ways/ “I am delighted that the IIJA reinforces our responsibility as a nation to honor the responsibility of the Indian Federal Trust and the Biden Administration’s commitment to equity and environmental justice as we rebuild better , especially with regard to tribal nations, “said Executive director Christine Harada. The Permits Board administers Title 41 of the […]]]>

“I am delighted that the IIJA reinforces our responsibility as a nation to honor the responsibility of the Indian Federal Trust and the Biden Administration’s commitment to equity and environmental justice as we rebuild better , especially with regard to tribal nations, “said Executive director Christine Harada.

The Permits Board administers Title 41 of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (FAST-41) and establishes best practices for the licensing of infrastructure across the federal government. As part of the IIJA, the Permitting Council will help ensure that infrastructure investments benefit communities across the country of India in the following ways:

  • Infrastructure projects sponsored by tribal entities and located on tribal lands will have increased access to the benefits of FAST-41, which include transparent, public authorization timelines and increased access to federal decision makers regarding their projects..
  • The Executive Director of the Permits Board will be authorized to transfer funds directly to the tribes to participate in the federal review and authorization of infrastructure projects affecting the tribe, thereby alleviating the financial burden of participating in the review of the tribes. projects..
  • The IIJA directs the 13 member agencies of the Permit Council to develop new government-wide best practices to improve the early engagement of agencies and project developers with tribal governments to identify potential impacts on communities. natural, archaeological and cultural resources of infrastructure projects authorized by the federal government..

Large, complex infrastructure projects can impact the land and cultural resources of any of the 574 American and Alaskan Indian tribes and villages recognized by the federal government in the United States. Tribal involvement in the infrastructure developed on tribal lands.

The Permits Council has successfully implemented the recommendations of the U.S. Government Accountability Office Report 2019 to help federal agencies ensure that their policies better communicate how they view tribal contribution in decision-making for proposed infrastructure projects. And he continues to rely on his Best Practices Report 2021 for high quality nation-to-nation engagement on infrastructure projects through its Tribal Initiative. The initiative includes providing government-wide training for more effective nation-to-nation engagement, organizing nation-to-nation consultations with White House and Permit Council officials, and facilitating the government-wide expansion of Tribal Directory Assistance Tool.

In addition, the The Biden administration is committed to regularly and meaningfully consulting with tribal leaders when formulating federal policy that affects tribal nations..

Learn more about the Directing Council for Federal Licensing Improvement.

Learn more about Title 41 of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (FAST-41).

SOURCE Permits Council

Related links

https://www.permits.performance.gov/


Source link

]]>
Nevada receives $ 4 billion from ‘historic’ infrastructure bill https://preservethenati.org/nevada-receives-4-billion-from-historic-infrastructure-bill/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 00:24:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/nevada-receives-4-billion-from-historic-infrastructure-bill/ LAS VEGAS (KTNV) – President Joe Biden signed a $ 1,000 billion infrastructure package on Monday, and about $ 4 billion of that money will be used here in Nevada. PREVIOUS: Biden Signs Infrastructure Bill in White House Ceremony Gov. Steve Sisolak celebrated the news with a press release, calling the package “historic” and writing […]]]>

LAS VEGAS (KTNV) – President Joe Biden signed a $ 1,000 billion infrastructure package on Monday, and about $ 4 billion of that money will be used here in Nevada.

PREVIOUS: Biden Signs Infrastructure Bill in White House Ceremony

Gov. Steve Sisolak celebrated the news with a press release, calling the package “historic” and writing that it “will improve the lives of millions of Nevada residents, create a generation of well-paying union jobs and growth. economic, and position the United States to win the 21st century. ”

The package includes:

  • $ 2.5 billion for federal assistance programs spread over highways
  • $ 459 million for public transportation
  • $ 403 million for hydraulic infrastructure
  • $ 293 million for airport improvements
  • $ 225 million to replace and repair bridges
  • $ 100 million for broadband infrastructure
  • $ 38 million for the expansion of electric vehicle charging stations
  • $ 12 million in cybersecurity infrastructure
  • $ 8.6 million for forest fire prevention

In addition, the governor’s office has estimated that the money will fund about 140,000 jobs.

The $ 2.5 billion allocated to the Nevada State Highway Fund will be spread over five years, according to the Nevada Department of Transportation. Over the next year, the state will receive an additional $ 83.5 million in transportation funding, an increase of about 21%. Funding will increase to $ 520.7 million by 2026.

The money will also help reduce the state’s $ 171 million backlog in bridge preservation work, officials said.

Transportation officials will prioritize the use of the money based on the One Nevada plan, they said. These priorities include “equitably meeting the long-term needs of all transport users such as cyclists, motorists, pedestrians and transit users” in a sustainable and safe manner.

“This funding is extremely important for the construction and maintenance of critical infrastructure that Nevada’s growing population needs,” said Kristina Swallow, director of the Nevada Department of Transportation. “While our long-term transportation funding constraints have yet to be resolved, we are delighted that this historic funding sets us on a better course to create a more connected, sustainable and equitable future for all Nevadans. “

Local officials shared their thoughts on how infrastructure funding could be spent, including Mayor Carolyn Goodman. She said she “would love to see some of this funding prioritize projects to move freight from the docks in California to the country.”

“The I-15 between Barstow and Stateline is a bottleneck that must be resolved,” the mayor noted in a tweet.



Source link

]]>
Comment: We know what works to keep children in Maine safe. Now is the time to act. https://preservethenati.org/comment-we-know-what-works-to-keep-children-in-maine-safe-now-is-the-time-to-act/ https://preservethenati.org/comment-we-know-what-works-to-keep-children-in-maine-safe-now-is-the-time-to-act/#respond Wed, 10 Nov 2021 09:00:16 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/comment-we-know-what-works-to-keep-children-in-maine-safe-now-is-the-time-to-act/ Following the deaths of five children earlier this year, the Maine Department of Health and Human Services asked Casey Family Programs, a national child protection agency, to conduct a study on the protection system. from the childhood of Maine. Last month, Casey Family Programs unveiled its findings, along with eight recommendations for improving the state’s […]]]>

Following the deaths of five children earlier this year, the Maine Department of Health and Human Services asked Casey Family Programs, a national child protection agency, to conduct a study on the protection system. from the childhood of Maine. Last month, Casey Family Programs unveiled its findings, along with eight recommendations for improving the state’s child welfare system.

A major reform of Maine’s child welfare system, undertaken after the 2001 death of a foster girl, made the state a national model in 2010, but many innovations were reversed by the last administration. Marija Stepanovic / Shutterstock.com

Maine’s child welfare system hasn’t always been in trouble. Following the death in 2001 of Logan Marr, a young foster girl, the state embarked on a major reform of its child welfare system, an effort that made it a national model. at the end of the decade.

These reforms have kept children and families out of the child welfare system while helping families struggling with abuse or neglect. In 2009, Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government named Maine’s child welfare reform effort as a finalist for its Innovations in American Government Award.

Placing children in “family care”, reducing reliance on institutional settings and increasing the availability of treatment homes have all been priorities. DHHS has also invested in community programs that have kept families from becoming entangled with the courts and the child welfare system. These efforts were so successful that the number of children in government care increased from 3,239 in 2000 to 1,527 in 2011.

Unfortunately, many of the innovative interventions were canceled by the last administration. The reduction in funding for essential programs has eroded the infrastructure for child welfare and family reunification has become a lower priority. The loss of key resources, coupled with the national opioid epidemic, has resulted in a significant increase in the number of children entering the child welfare system.

Even before the opioid epidemic, a high percentage of child protection cases involved substance use. This crisis has accelerated cases of child neglect and significantly increased the number of children in state care. Currently, more than 2,100 children in Maine are in state care.

In addition to the analysis of Casey’s family programs, a state agency is conducting a formal investigation into the deaths while two legislative committees look at systemic concerns and political issues. While the DHHS has said it is already implementing the report’s recommendations, investigations and legislation are months away from moving forward.

In our respective positions as Chairs of the Committee on Health and Social Services and the Committee on Education and Cultural Affairs, we offer a five-point plan to immediately improve outcomes for children and families.

• First, we have asked the Attorney General to allocate at least $ 3 million from the Opioid Drug Settlement to DHHS to help families struggling with drug addiction. In the past, similar approaches have helped families reunite and successfully manage their recovery.

• Second, DHHS and relevant state agencies must continue to develop an integrated system of services and response. Many families in the child welfare system need the help of multiple ministries. The Children’s Cabinet, which includes the Commissioners of Health and Social Services, Education, Labor, Public Safety and Corrections, is best positioned to foster integrated systems and maintain collaboration between agencies. public. We believe that this approach would be more productive than creating a separate department, as has been suggested by others.

• Third, DHHS should review cases of high risk families and offer community intervention services, including family visitation programs. Providing services to high-risk families can prevent them from slipping into the child welfare system.

• Fourth, the Office of the Child Welfare Ombudsman should be immediately allocated funds for additional staff. This would increase its ability to review individual cases and identify better ways to keep children safe and advocate for best practice based on research.

• Fifth, the Children’s Cabinet should convene a committee to develop recommendations aimed at increasing the financial well-being of families who struggle to provide appropriate care for their children. Neglect is one of the main reasons children are placed in state custody, and although neglect is often linked to substance use and mental health issues, poverty is also a factor. serious risk.

Much remains to be done before our child welfare system is once again regarded as one of the best in the country. By restoring programs and adopting policies that have been successful in the past, we believe Maine will chart a course to ensure our children are protected and able to thrive.


Use the form below to reset your password. When you submit your account email, we’ll send you an email with a reset code.

” Previous

Next ”


Source link

]]>
https://preservethenati.org/comment-we-know-what-works-to-keep-children-in-maine-safe-now-is-the-time-to-act/feed/ 0
Historic Infrastructure Bill Heads To Biden’s Office After House OK | 2021-11-05 https://preservethenati.org/historic-infrastructure-bill-heads-to-bidens-office-after-house-ok-2021-11-05/ https://preservethenati.org/historic-infrastructure-bill-heads-to-bidens-office-after-house-ok-2021-11-05/#respond Sat, 06 Nov 2021 01:04:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/historic-infrastructure-bill-heads-to-bidens-office-after-house-ok-2021-11-05/ The House finally approved a $ 1.2 trillion infrastructure bill on Friday night that will provide a historic injection of federal funding into rural broadband expansion and the construction of roads, bridges, waterways and Western water supply projects. The House separately separated action on President Joe Biden’s biggest climate action and social spending package, Build […]]]>

The House finally approved a $ 1.2 trillion infrastructure bill on Friday night that will provide a historic injection of federal funding into rural broadband expansion and the construction of roads, bridges, waterways and Western water supply projects.

The House separately separated action on President Joe Biden’s biggest climate action and social spending package, Build Back Better, until the end of Veterans Day next week.

The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act was easily passed by the Senate on August 10 with the support of 19 Republicans and 50 Democrats. But the measure stalled in the House when progressives conditioned their support for the legislation on passing the highly partisan Build Back Better measure. The public works bill was not passed, 228-206, until Friday night after a dramatic standoff between progressives and a small group of moderate Democrats.

From September, Biden sided with the progressives in demanding that the House move the two bills together, but the House was plunged into chaos on Friday when a group of moderates hesitated to vote for the bill. Build Back Better law before the Congressional Budget Office provides an estimate of its cost. Progressives, in turn, continued to resist voting for the Uninsured Infrastructure Bill over the Build Back Better Bill. But they finally gave in after a group of five moderates has agreed to support the bill if the CBO’s estimate matches that provided by the White House.

Biden released a statement Friday night pressuring progressives to vote in favor of the public works bill. “I am confident that the week of November 15, the House will pass the Build Back Better bill,” he said.

Thirteen Republicans joined Democrats to pass the bill. Six Democrats voted against.

Don’t miss a beat! It’s easy to sign up for a FREE month of Agri-Pulse new! For the latest news on what’s happening in Washington, DC and around the country in agriculture, just click here.

“Good things can indeed happen to those who wait, and the passage of this long-considered bill is a victory for everyone in our country,” said Kevin Scott, a farmer from South Dakota who is president. of the American Soybean Association. “Infrastructure is critical. To the long-term success not only of the agriculture industry, but also of the overall health of US commerce and global competitiveness.”

The infrastructure bill includes $ 550 billion in new spending; the rest of the funding is to expand existing programs.

The new funding includes $ 110 billion for roads and bridges, $ 65 billion to expand broadband and $ 17.3 billion for ports and inland waterways.

Some $ 42.45 billion of broadband funding will be distributed by the Commerce Department to states, territories and tribes, while $ 2 billion is for the Department of Agriculture’s existing rural broadband programs.

Projects funded under the bill will have to provide download speeds of 100 megabits per second and upload speeds of 20 Mbps. States will be required to prioritize unserved areas for projects.

An additional $ 9.6 billion in the bill is for Army Corps of Engineers priorities, including $ 5.2 billion for new construction, and an additional $ 8.3 billion would be for water needs from West.

Of the Western water funding, some $ 3.2 billion is allocated for aging infrastructure and $ 1.2 billion for water storage, groundwater storage and transportation projects. Another billion dollars is allocated to water recycling projects.

The bill also provides $ 73 billion for clean energy transportation and $ 66 billion for improved passenger and freight rail transportation.

The bill would provide $ 918 million over five years for the Department of Agriculture’s watershed programs.

Most of the funding, some $ 500 million, will go to the Watershed and Flood Prevention Operations program, which is administered by the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service. Another $ 118 million is earmarked for the Watershed Rehabilitation Program, which provides assistance for the renovation of dams. The program has a backlog of over $ 500 million. Some $ 300 million is allocated to forest fire resilience under the Emergency Watershed Protection Program.

Also included is $ 10 million for a USDA by-product pilot program that would study the benefits of using materials derived from agricultural products in construction and consumer products.

The American Farm Bureau Federation also welcomed the adoption of the measure.

“We cannot afford to ignore the millions of miles of roads, waterways and railways that rural America relies on to feed our country, especially as we see chain problems. ‘widespread supply,’ said AFBF chairman Zippy Duvall.

“Extending broadband to rural communities is just as much of a priority. A quarter of American farm families lack high-speed internet access while working to meet the needs of a growing world. Investments in physical infrastructure such as broadband will be essential to bridge the digital divide. “

The Association of Equipment Manufacturers, which represents companies like John Deere, had previously pleaded with lawmakers to go ahead and pass the infrastructure measure.

“The need to invest once a century in our roads and bridges, public transport, railways and ports, clean water and broadband – not to mention 100,000 jobs in equipment manufacturing family that it will create – has never been greater, ”said Kip Eideberg, senior vice president of government and industry relations at AEM.

“The growing economic consequences of inaction are hitting equipment manufacturers across the country at a time when they can least afford it. “

The fate of the Build Back Better bill is less clear. Even if the House approves it, it is likely to be reduced to the Senate. The legislation includes more than $ 90 billion in agricultural provisions, as well as tax incentives for biofuels.

For more information, visit Agri-Pulse.com.



Source link

]]>
https://preservethenati.org/historic-infrastructure-bill-heads-to-bidens-office-after-house-ok-2021-11-05/feed/ 0
Alaska to benefit greatly from historic infrastructure bill https://preservethenati.org/alaska-to-benefit-greatly-from-historic-infrastructure-bill/ https://preservethenati.org/alaska-to-benefit-greatly-from-historic-infrastructure-bill/#respond Fri, 01 Oct 2021 15:51:38 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/alaska-to-benefit-greatly-from-historic-infrastructure-bill/ Senator Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska. Photo by Margaret Bauman / for the Cordova Times Several years ago, the American Society of Civil Engineers gave Alaska’s infrastructure a C-minus rating. Their report reiterated what too many Alaskans know and face every day: our still young state lacks water and wastewater, ports and harbors, shipping, energy and electrical […]]]>
Senator Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska. Photo by Margaret Bauman / for the Cordova Times

Several years ago, the American Society of Civil Engineers gave Alaska’s infrastructure a C-minus rating. Their report reiterated what too many Alaskans know and face every day: our still young state lacks water and wastewater, ports and harbors, shipping, energy and electrical infrastructure, and more. . Even in our top rated areas – like roads and airports – Alaska still has a lot of room for improvement.

One of the best ways to fill these gaps is to bring timely federal funding and assistance back to the country. This is where I put my attention, and a Historic infrastructure bill that will bring massive benefits to our state is now within reach.

Over the past few months, I have worked with nine other senators to achieve a bipartisan consensus on traditional “core” infrastructure. Our bill will provide an additional $ 550 billion for these priorities over the next five years without raising taxes. It will increase our standard of living, create jobs and opportunities, and curb inflation that threatens families and businesses.

I was able to add many provisions to our bipartisan bill that are intended to help Alaska.

Alaska will receive billions of dollars to build, maintain and upgrade our roads, railways, and to fix the more than 140 structurally deficient bridges in our state. To help tackle some of our most pressing challenges, we are creating a pipeline for projects in rural Alaska.

Our bill recognizes that Alaskans often travel by air or sea and invests in the lifelines that connect our communities – our marine road system, ferries, ports and small airports. The funding we receive will facilitate a new program for an essential ferry system and an electric or low-emission ferry pilot program.

To make Alaska’s lack of water and wastewater infrastructure a thing of the past, we are supporting the EPA’s Alaska Native Village Grants Program so communities can build and improve their water supply systems. We are also providing funding for Indian health services sanitation facilities to ensure that our rural communities can finally have piped water and sewer service to their homes.

In view of our increasingly connected world, our bill takes important steps to bring broadband to rural areas at high cost, both through the Tribal Connectivity Grant Program and another for the construction, improvement or acquisition of intermediate infrastructure.

To address the twin challenges of high energy prices and climate change in Alaska, we have prioritized energy infrastructure and resilience to help communities build cleaner, more reliable, and more affordable systems. Part of that means funding for my Energy Act, which Congress passed last year to spur innovation in everything from energy storage and renewables to carbon capture, to modernization. network and hydrogen.

Another area of ​​interest is the reconstruction of national supply chains. We have included the licensing reforms I drafted to help reverse our reliance on foreign minerals, which we can start to do by responsibly producing more critical minerals here in Alaska.

Our bipartisan bill also includes my tongue to ensure that the Alaska pipeline project is eligible for a multibillion dollar loan guarantee from the Department of Energy. This will help us overcome a critical sticking point as we seek to commercialize North Slope natural gas.

Another great victory concerns forest fire preparedness. Significant funding is provided to support Mechanical Thinning and Community Forest Fire Defense grants. A simplified NEPA permit is included to build fuel breaks.

The above items are just the beginning of what our bipartisan Alaska bill contains. But it’s important to distinguish it from what Congress will soon undertake – an all-partisan abuse of the budget process that will spend up to $ 3.5 trillion, impose sweeping tax hikes that hit countless small businesses, and willfully deprive Alaska of economic opportunity. The partisan “reconciliation” process could not be more different from the approach we took on our bipartisan bill, where we focused on reducing the distance between parties rather than amplifying it. Our bipartisan bill passed the Senate with nearly 70 votes and garnered immense support from the Chamber of Commerce, the AFL-CIO and hundreds of other groups.

The bipartisan infrastructure bill is one of the most important legislative efforts I have worked on. It is good for the nation and will provide huge benefits to Alaska that will pay off for decades to come. This historic measure is now pending in the House of Representatives, where it should be taken up and adopted without further delay. Our infrastructure demands it, and Alaskans deserve no less.

Senator Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, is the United States Senator from Alaska


Source link

]]>
https://preservethenati.org/alaska-to-benefit-greatly-from-historic-infrastructure-bill/feed/ 0
Opinion: Alaska to benefit greatly from historic infrastructure bill https://preservethenati.org/opinion-alaska-to-benefit-greatly-from-historic-infrastructure-bill/ Sat, 25 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/opinion-alaska-to-benefit-greatly-from-historic-infrastructure-bill/ Several years ago, the American Society of Civil Engineers gave Alaska’s infrastructure a C-minus rating. Their report reiterated what too many Alaskans know and face every day: our still young state lacks water and wastewater, ports and harbors, shipping, energy and electrical infrastructure, and more. Even in our top ranked areas – like roads and […]]]>

Several years ago, the American Society of Civil Engineers gave Alaska’s infrastructure a C-minus rating. Their report reiterated what too many Alaskans know and face every day: our still young state lacks water and wastewater, ports and harbors, shipping, energy and electrical infrastructure, and more. Even in our top ranked areas – like roads and airports – Alaska still has a lot of room for improvement.

One of the best ways to address these gaps is to bring timely federal funding and assistance back to the country. This is where I put my attention, and a historic infrastructure bill that will bring tremendous benefits to our state is now at hand.

Over the past few months, I have worked with nine other senators to achieve a bipartisan consensus on traditional “core” infrastructure. Our bill will provide an additional $ 550 billion for these priorities over the next five years without raising taxes. It will raise our standard of living, create jobs and opportunities, and curb inflation that threatens families and businesses.

I was able to add many provisions to our bipartisan bill that are intended to help Alaska.

Alaska will receive billions of dollars to build, maintain and modernize our roads, railways, and to repair our state’s more than 140 structurally deficient bridges. To help tackle some of our most pressing challenges, we are creating a pipeline for projects in rural Alaska.

Our bill recognizes that Alaskans often travel by air or sea and invests in the lifelines that connect our communities — our marine road system, ferries, ports and small airports. The funding we receive will facilitate a new program for an essential ferry system and an electric or low-emission ferry pilot program.

To make Alaska’s lack of water and wastewater infrastructure a thing of the past, we are supporting the EPA’s Alaska Native Village Grants Program so communities can build and improve their water supply systems. We are also providing funding for Indian health services sanitation facilities to ensure that our rural communities can finally have piped water and sewer service to their homes.

In light of our increasingly connected world, our bill takes important steps to bring broadband to rural areas at high cost, both through the Tribal Connectivity Grant Program and another for the construction, improvement or acquisition of intermediate infrastructure.

To address the twin challenges of high energy prices and climate change in Alaska, we have prioritized energy infrastructure and resilience to help communities build cleaner, more reliable and more affordable systems. Part of that means funding for my Energy Act, which Congress passed last year to spur innovation in everything from energy storage and renewables to carbon capture, modernization of the network and hydrogen.

Another area of ​​interest is the reconstruction of national supply chains. We have included the licensing reforms I drafted to help reverse our reliance on foreign minerals, which we can start to do by responsibly producing more critical minerals here in Alaska.

Our bipartisan bill also includes my tongue to ensure that the Alaska pipeline project is eligible for a multibillion dollar loan guarantee from the Department of Energy. This will help us overcome a critical sticking point as we seek to commercialize North Slope natural gas.

Another great victory concerns forest fire preparedness. Significant funding is provided to support Mechanical Thinning and Community Forest Fire Defense grants. A simplified NEPA permit is included to build fuel breaks.

The above items are just the beginning of what is in our bipartisan Alaska bill. But it’s important to distinguish it from what Congress will soon undertake: a fully partisan abuse of the budget process that will spend up to $ 3.5 trillion, impose sweeping tax hikes that hit countless small businesses, and willfully deprive Alaska of economic opportunity. The partisan “reconciliation” process could not be more different from the approach we took on our bipartisan bill, where we focused on reducing the distance between parties rather than amplifying it. Our bipartisan bill passed the Senate with nearly 70 votes and garnered immense support from the Chamber of Commerce, the AFL-CIO and hundreds of other groups.

The bipartisan infrastructure bill is one of the most important legislative efforts I have worked on. It is good for the nation and will bring huge benefits to Alaska that will pay off for decades to come. This historic measure is now pending in the House of Representatives, where it should be taken up and adopted without further delay. Our infrastructure demands it, and Alaskans deserve no less.

Senator Lisa Murkowski represents Alaska in the United States Senate.



Source link

]]>
Alaska to benefit greatly from historic infrastructure bill https://preservethenati.org/alaska-to-benefit-greatly-from-historic-infrastructure-bill-3/ https://preservethenati.org/alaska-to-benefit-greatly-from-historic-infrastructure-bill-3/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/alaska-to-benefit-greatly-from-historic-infrastructure-bill-3/ 09.22.21 Several years ago, the American Society of Civil Engineers gave Alaska’s infrastructure a C-minus rating. Their report reiterated what too many Alaskans know and face every day: our still young state lacks water and wastewater, ports and harbors, shipping, energy and electrical infrastructure, and more. . Even in our top ranked areas, like roads […]]]>

09.22.21

Several years ago, the American Society of Civil Engineers gave Alaska’s infrastructure a C-minus rating. Their report reiterated what too many Alaskans know and face every day: our still young state lacks water and wastewater, ports and harbors, shipping, energy and electrical infrastructure, and more. . Even in our top ranked areas, like roads and airports, Alaska still has a lot of room for improvement.

One of the best ways to address these gaps is to bring timely federal funding and assistance back to the country. This is where I put my attention, and a historic infrastructure bill that will bring tremendous benefits to our state is now at hand.

Over the past several months, I have worked with nine other senators to achieve a bipartisan consensus on traditional “core” infrastructure. Our bill will provide an additional $ 550 billion for these priorities over the next five years without raising taxes. It will raise our standard of living, create jobs and opportunities, and curb inflation that threatens families and businesses.

I was able to add many provisions to our bipartisan bill that are intended to help Alaska.

Alaska will receive billions of dollars to build, maintain and modernize our roads, railways, and to repair the more than 140 structurally deficient bridges in our state. To help tackle some of our most pressing challenges, we are creating a pipeline for projects in rural Alaska.

Our bill recognizes that Alaskans often travel by air or sea and invests in the lifelines that connect our communities – our marine road system, ferries, ports and small airports. The funding we receive will facilitate a new program for an essential ferry system and an electric or low-emission ferry pilot program.

To make Alaska’s lack of water and wastewater infrastructure a thing of the past, we are supporting the EPA’s Alaska Native Village Grants Program so communities can build and improve their water supply systems. We are also providing funding for Indian health services sanitation facilities to ensure that our rural communities can finally have piped water and sewer service to their homes.

In light of our increasingly connected world, our bill takes important steps to bring broadband to rural areas at high cost, both through the Tribal Connectivity Grant Program and another for the construction, improvement or acquisition of intermediate infrastructure.

To meet the twin challenges of high energy prices and climate change in Alaska, we have prioritized energy infrastructure and resilience to help communities build cleaner, more reliable, and more affordable systems. Part of that means funding for my Energy Act, which Congress passed last year to spur innovation in everything from energy storage and renewables to carbon capture, to modernization. network and hydrogen.

Another area of ​​interest is the reconstruction of national supply chains. We have included the licensing reforms I drafted to help reverse our reliance on foreign minerals, which we can start to do by responsibly producing more critical minerals here in Alaska.

Our bipartisan bill also includes my tongue to ensure that the Alaska pipeline project is eligible for a multibillion dollar loan guarantee from the Department of Energy. This will help us overcome a critical sticking point as we seek to commercialize North Slope natural gas.

Another great victory concerns forest fire preparedness. Significant funding is provided to support Mechanical Thinning and Community Forest Fire Defense grants. A simplified NEPA permit is included to build fuel breaks.

The above items are just the beginning of what our bipartisan Alaska bill contains. But it’s important to distinguish it from what Congress will soon undertake – an all-partisan abuse of the budget process that will spend up to $ 3.5 trillion, impose sweeping tax hikes that hit countless small businesses, and willfully deprive Alaska of economic opportunity. The partisan “reconciliation” process could not be more different from the approach we took on our bipartisan bill, where we focused on reducing the distance between parties rather than amplifying it. Our bipartisan bill passed the Senate with nearly 70 votes and garnered immense support from the Chamber of Commerce, the AFL-CIO and hundreds of other groups.

The bipartisan infrastructure bill is one of the most important legislative efforts I have worked on. It’s good for the nation and will deliver huge benefits to Alaska that will pay off for decades to come. This historic measure is now pending in the House of Representatives, where it should be taken up and adopted without further delay. Our infrastructure demands it, and Alaskans deserve no less.

Lisa Murkowski represents Alaska in the United States Senate. She’s a Republican.

By: Senator Lisa Murkowski

Source:

Daily News from Anchorage



Source link

]]>
https://preservethenati.org/alaska-to-benefit-greatly-from-historic-infrastructure-bill-3/feed/ 0
Alaska to benefit greatly from historic infrastructure bill https://preservethenati.org/alaska-to-benefit-greatly-from-historic-infrastructure-bill-2/ https://preservethenati.org/alaska-to-benefit-greatly-from-historic-infrastructure-bill-2/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/alaska-to-benefit-greatly-from-historic-infrastructure-bill-2/ Senator Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, one of the bipartisan infrastructure negotiators, leaves the chamber as the Senate moves forward to formally begin debate on a roughly $ 1,000 billion infrastructure plan, a process that could take several days, at the Capitol in Washington on July 30. (J. Scott Applewhite / Associated Press) Several years ago, the […]]]>

Several years ago, the American Society of Civil Engineers gave Alaska’s infrastructure a C-minus rating. Their report reiterated what too many Alaskans know and face every day: our still young state lacks water and sewage, ports and harbors, shipping, energy and electrical infrastructure, and more. . Even in our top ranked areas, like roads and airports, Alaska still has a lot of room for improvement.

One of the best ways to address these shortcomings is to bring timely federal funding and assistance back to the country. This is where I put my attention, and a historic infrastructure bill that will bring tremendous benefits to our state is now at hand.

Over the past several months, I have worked with nine other senators to achieve a bipartisan consensus on traditional “core” infrastructure. Our bill will provide an additional $ 550 billion for these priorities over the next five years without raising taxes. It will increase our standard of living, create jobs and opportunities, and curb inflation that threatens families and businesses.

I was able to add many provisions to our bipartisan bill that are intended to help Alaska.

Alaska will receive billions of dollars to build, maintain and upgrade our roads, railways, and to fix the more than 140 structurally deficient bridges in our state. To help tackle some of our most pressing challenges, we are creating a pipeline for projects in rural Alaska.

Our bill recognizes that Alaskans often travel by air or sea and invests in the lifelines that connect our communities – our marine highway system, ferries, ports and small airports. The funding we receive will facilitate a new program for an essential ferry system and an electric or low-emission ferry pilot program.

To make Alaska’s lack of water and wastewater infrastructure a thing of the past, we are supporting the EPA’s Alaska Native Village Grants Program so communities can build and improve their water supply systems. We are also providing funding for Indian health services sanitation facilities to ensure that our rural communities can finally have piped water and sewage service to their homes.

In view of our increasingly connected world, our bill takes important steps to bring broadband to rural areas at high cost, both through the Tribal Connectivity Grant Program and another for the construction, improvement or acquisition of intermediate infrastructure.

To meet the twin challenges of high energy prices and climate change in Alaska, we have prioritized energy infrastructure and resilience to help communities build cleaner, more reliable, and more affordable systems. Part of that means funding for my Energy Act, which Congress passed last year to spur innovation in everything from energy storage and renewables to carbon capture, to modernization. network and hydrogen.

Another area of ​​interest is the reconstruction of national supply chains. We have included the licensing reforms I drafted to help reverse our reliance on foreign minerals, which we can start to do by responsibly producing more critical minerals here in Alaska.

Our bipartisan bill also includes my tongue to ensure that the Alaska pipeline project is eligible for a multibillion dollar loan guarantee from the Department of Energy. This will help us overcome a critical sticking point as we seek to commercialize North Slope natural gas.

Another great victory concerns forest fire preparedness. Significant funding is provided to support Mechanical Thinning and Community Forest Fire Defense grants. A simplified NEPA permit is included to build fuel breaks.

The above items are just the beginning of what our bipartisan Alaska bill contains. But it’s important to distinguish it from what Congress will soon undertake – an all-partisan abuse of the budget process that will spend up to $ 3.5 trillion, impose sweeping tax hikes that hit countless small businesses, and willfully deprive Alaska of economic opportunity. The partisan “reconciliation” process could not be more different from the approach we took on our bipartisan bill, where we focused on reducing the distance between parties rather than amplifying it. Our bipartisan bill passed the Senate with nearly 70 votes and garnered immense support from the Chamber of Commerce, the AFL-CIO and hundreds of other groups.

The bipartisan infrastructure bill is one of the most significant legislative efforts I have worked on. It’s good for the nation and will bring huge benefits to Alaska that will pay off for decades to come. This historic measure is now pending in the House of Representatives, where it should be taken up and adopted without further delay. Our infrastructure demands it, and Alaskans deserve no less.

Lisa Murkowski represents Alaska in the United States Senate. She’s a Republican.

The opinions expressed here are those of the author and are not necessarily endorsed by Anchorage Daily News, which welcomes a wide range of views. To submit an article for review, send an email comment (at) adn.com. Send submissions under 200 words to letters@adn.com Where click here to submit via any web browser. Read our full guidelines for letters and comments here.


Source link

]]>
https://preservethenati.org/alaska-to-benefit-greatly-from-historic-infrastructure-bill-2/feed/ 0
Guest Column: Historic Infrastructure Bill Will Improve Minnesota Life For Generations https://preservethenati.org/guest-column-historic-infrastructure-bill-will-improve-minnesota-life-for-generations/ https://preservethenati.org/guest-column-historic-infrastructure-bill-will-improve-minnesota-life-for-generations/#respond Sat, 28 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/guest-column-historic-infrastructure-bill-will-improve-minnesota-life-for-generations/ The heavily bipartisan move will mean residents of Minnesota and across the country will soon see a transformative injection of funds to repair roads, bridges, highways, water systems, railroads, ports and cities. electrical networks. It is also providing $ 65 billion to bring quality, affordable broadband networks to communities – especially those in rural America […]]]>

The heavily bipartisan move will mean residents of Minnesota and across the country will soon see a transformative injection of funds to repair roads, bridges, highways, water systems, railroads, ports and cities. electrical networks.

It is also providing $ 65 billion to bring quality, affordable broadband networks to communities – especially those in rural America – that have for too long struggled to thrive without modern high-speed internet.

In Minnesota, it will jumpstart the economy and help complete hundreds of local projects in communities of all sizes and across the state. The resulting improvements will create and support well-paying jobs across the country and strengthen our country’s efforts to tackle climate change.

Minnesota urgently needs infrastructure investment

The need to invest in infrastructure is clear. For decades, Minnesota has suffered from a lack of funding that has hampered efforts to modernize our systems, made travel less efficient, and hampered economic growth. In fact, the American Society of Civil Engineers gave Minnesota a grade of C on its infrastructure scorecard.

Earlier this year, a senior state transportation official told the Minnesota Legislature that there were more than 800 bridges to be repaired or replaced over the next decade that were not part of the plan. Minnesota Ten-Year Funding.

He also said that without additional funding, Minnesota would find itself in “unprecedented territory” in the years to come for the number of poor highways.

Fortunately, the Senate infrastructure bill addresses these needs by sending Minnesota $ 4.5 billion for freeway upgrades, $ 302 million for bridge replacement and repair, $ 856 million dollars for our transit systems and at least $ 100 million for broadband across the state.

This means that people traveling to cabins in north-central Minnesota could see the funding needed to complete the extension of Highway 371 from a two-lane to a four-lane stretch from Nisswa to Pine. River. Now Minnesota will have the resources to undertake projects like these statewide.

Minnesota to receive $ 100 million to improve broadband

When I first came to the Senate, one of my main priorities was to increase access to broadband. It’s not just fun to have, it’s a 21st century necessity for communities striving to attract families and businesses, and create jobs and economic development.

Broadband connects students to top-notch education and enables healthcare institutions to provide much-needed and often life-saving services, such as telehealth. The current pandemic has shown us how important quality broadband is for people working from home and for students who learn remotely.

Sadly, I’ve heard too many stories of parents in Minnesota being forced into a fast food parking lot to access a connection good enough for their kids to do their homework. And even the best-run businesses struggle to compete – and connect with customers – without quality broadband.

The infrastructure bill changes that. Minnesota will receive a minimum of $ 100 million, which will significantly increase our state’s efforts to connect its 157,000 homes currently without service. It also ensures that new broadband services are affordable and that any new system provides quality connections so that users – especially those in rural areas – are not stuck with substandard or second-class service.

Bill on infrastructure to complete the next budget “Build back better”

While the infrastructure bill is historic, we still have work to do to make the necessary investments that give our nation the tools to succeed, lower taxes and lower costs for working families.

Shortly after the passage of the infrastructure bill, the Senate also approved the outline of our “Build Back Better” budget. Under this budget deal, Congress will work this fall on detailed efforts to dramatically improve our nation’s housing, education, child care and clean energy infrastructure, as well as reduce drug costs. on prescription.

One of my top priorities will be to continue moving our country forward towards a clean energy future by promulgating a clean electricity standard that over time achieves net zero emissions in our electricity sector. It will be at the heart of our efforts to fight climate change, put the United States at the forefront of technological innovation, and create millions of well-paying jobs.

With the passage of the Infrastructure Bill, we are no longer just talking about infrastructure, we are actually achieving results that will improve the lives of millions of Minnesotans, create a generation of jobs and economic growth, and position our country to succeed in the 21st century.

Tina Smith represents Minnesota in the US Senate.


Source link

]]>
https://preservethenati.org/guest-column-historic-infrastructure-bill-will-improve-minnesota-life-for-generations/feed/ 0