Historic infrastructure – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 21:29:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://preservethenati.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/nati.png Historic infrastructure – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ 32 32 Swing bridge maintenance work to preserve historic infrastructure https://preservethenati.org/swing-bridge-maintenance-work-to-preserve-historic-infrastructure/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 09:28:37 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/swing-bridge-maintenance-work-to-preserve-historic-infrastructure/ Network Rail engineers will work on vital upgrades to the electrical and mechanical systems inside the Reedham and Somerleyton swing bridges, with work starting from Saturday October 22 to Sunday October 30. These historic and iconic bridges are used to carry trains and general rolling stock across the waterways, while having the ability to swing […]]]>

Network Rail engineers will work on vital upgrades to the electrical and mechanical systems inside the Reedham and Somerleyton swing bridges, with work starting from Saturday October 22 to Sunday October 30.

These historic and iconic bridges are used to carry trains and general rolling stock across the waterways, while having the ability to swing open, allowing boats to pass. After more than 100 years of service to communities, internal infrastructure parts and mechanisms have become unreliable, requiring parts to be replaced and restored. The ambition of this project is to ensure the resilience and reliability of bridges, making them less likely to develop future faults, which, in turn, will reduce overall future maintenance costs.

Ellie Burrows, Network Rail Routes Manager for Anglia, said:

“These bridges on the Wherry and East Suffolk lines are an important part of our railway heritage and also essential pieces of infrastructure that keep rail and sea traffic moving. The renewal of components will reduce the risk of mechanical problems and help ensure the safe, smooth and reliable operation of services for our passengers, as well as maintaining access to ports and marinas.

During a project of this size, there are often safety issues for passengers along the route and the crews carrying out the work. To ensure this work is carried out safely for all parties, a section of the railway will have to be closed, meaning buses will replace trains between Norwich and Lowestoft for nine consecutive days between Saturday October 22 and Sunday October 30.

The opening days of the project (22nd and 23rd October) will see further work on the Oulton Broad Swing Bridge, resulting in further bus replacements between Halesworth and Lowestoft this weekend only.

Jamie Burles, Chief Executive of Greater Anglia, said:

“Our new trains have already improved the reliability of our Norwich and Ipswich-Lowestoft lines and this work will make it even better, which I know our customers will appreciate. During the works we will ensure that customers can still make their journey with a rail replacement bus service.

Access to the river for ships will be limited during the works, but there will be short windows of opportunity to open the bridges during the closures. These are communicated by the Broads Authority directly to boat users.

These upgrades, when completed, will have transformative value for Greater Anglia’s train passengers and boat users who will reliably reach their destination for years to come, while ensuring that historic infrastructure can be defended and integrated into modern transport.

The continuation of work on the three swing bridges will take place in the spring of 2023, the closing dates being to be specified.

Interested in learning more about opportunities to become a key supplier to the UK rail industry? Attend TransCityRail and access an exclusive market of buyers from Network Rail, HS2, rail operators, major contractors and all other levels of the supply chain. For more information and to reserve your place Click here.

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Swing bridge maintenance work to preserve historic infrastructure https://preservethenati.org/swing-bridge-maintenance-work-to-preserve-historic-infrastructure-2/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 09:28:37 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/swing-bridge-maintenance-work-to-preserve-historic-infrastructure-2/ Network Rail engineers will work on vital upgrades to the electrical and mechanical systems inside the Reedham and Somerleyton swing bridges, with work starting from Saturday October 22 to Sunday October 30. These historic and iconic bridges are used to carry trains and general rolling stock across the waterways, while having the ability to swing […]]]>

Network Rail engineers will work on vital upgrades to the electrical and mechanical systems inside the Reedham and Somerleyton swing bridges, with work starting from Saturday October 22 to Sunday October 30.

These historic and iconic bridges are used to carry trains and general rolling stock across the waterways, while having the ability to swing open, allowing boats to pass. After more than 100 years of service to communities, internal infrastructure parts and mechanisms have become unreliable, requiring parts to be replaced and restored. The ambition of this project is to ensure the resilience and reliability of bridges, making them less likely to develop future faults, which, in turn, will reduce overall future maintenance costs.

Ellie Burrows, Network Rail Routes Manager for Anglia, said:

“These bridges on the Wherry and East Suffolk lines are an important part of our railway heritage and also essential pieces of infrastructure that keep rail and sea traffic moving. The renewal of components will reduce the risk of mechanical problems and help ensure the safe, smooth and reliable operation of services for our passengers, as well as maintaining access to ports and marinas.

During a project of this size, there are often safety issues for passengers along the route and the crews carrying out the work. To ensure this work is carried out safely for all parties, a section of the railway will have to be closed, meaning buses will replace trains between Norwich and Lowestoft for nine consecutive days between Saturday October 22 and Sunday October 30.

The opening days of the project (22nd and 23rd October) will see further work on the Oulton Broad Swing Bridge, resulting in further bus replacements between Halesworth and Lowestoft this weekend only.

Jamie Burles, Chief Executive of Greater Anglia, said:

“Our new trains have already improved the reliability of our Norwich and Ipswich-Lowestoft lines and this work will make it even better, which I know our customers will appreciate. During the works we will ensure that customers can still make their journey with a rail replacement bus service.

Access to the river for ships will be limited during the works, but there will be short windows of opportunity to open the bridges during the closures. These are communicated by the Broads Authority directly to boat users.

These upgrades, when completed, will have transformative value for Greater Anglia’s train passengers and boat users who will reliably reach their destination for years to come, while ensuring that historic infrastructure can be defended and integrated into modern transport.

The continuation of work on the three swing bridges will take place in the spring of 2023, the closing dates being to be specified.

Interested in learning more about opportunities to become a key supplier to the UK rail industry? Attend TransCityRail and access an exclusive market of buyers from Network Rail, HS2, rail operators, major contractors and all other levels of the supply chain. For more information and to reserve your place Click here.

]]>
President Joe Biden’s historic investments in infrastructure and climate will require building rural capacity https://preservethenati.org/president-joe-bidens-historic-investments-in-infrastructure-and-climate-will-require-building-rural-capacity/ Thu, 06 Oct 2022 13:14:38 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/president-joe-bidens-historic-investments-in-infrastructure-and-climate-will-require-building-rural-capacity/ Over the past year, Congress has delivered on President Joe Biden’s vision, making potentially transformative investments in the workforce, energy systems, infrastructure, competitiveness, and resilience of American communities. However, passing laws and allocating funds are only the beginning. States, local governments, and rural leaders will need to prepare plans, apply for funding, and manage complex […]]]>

Over the past year, Congress has delivered on President Joe Biden’s vision, making potentially transformative investments in the workforce, energy systems, infrastructure, competitiveness, and resilience of American communities. However, passing laws and allocating funds are only the beginning. States, local governments, and rural leaders will need to prepare plans, apply for funding, and manage complex construction and restoration projects. All of this requires the capacity – the staff, expertise, financial resources and networks, including political influence – to follow up on funding opportunities.

Rural areas are often stretched. A natural disaster can easily overwhelm a small town’s response capacity. Infrastructure in rural areas is often already in relatively poor condition, and rural areas have fewer assets and resources to deploy before or after a natural disaster.1

The Center for American Progress recently released two reports that assess the ways in which missed opportunities in the implementation of federal resilience programs illustrate the challenges facing rural communities. Through interviews with various federal, state and local experts and officials, the reports explore how resilience funding in the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act of 2021, also known as the Bipartisan infrastructure, can better serve rural areas facing significant climate risk. While this research is based on case studies of specific programs, the reports also offer broadly applicable recommendations to policy makers when designing and implementing programs to include rural communities in climate change adaptation and recovery efforts. effects of climate change.

Read the reports in this series


Some initial solutions may include:

Ability

  • Invest up to 20% of grants in sustainable capacity building, such as hiring local and long-term staff; providing technical and leadership training; and supporting planning, outreach and peer networks so that rural communities are not isolated.
  • Target more non-competitive project funding to low-capacity rural communities using metrics that measure physical and social vulnerability and capacity.
  • Increase rural competitiveness for national grants by making small, well-designed projects eligible; allow non-governmental organizations to apply on behalf of communities and coordinate regional projects; allow states to opt out of program implementation; and waive requirements that are barriers for underfunded venues, such as matching funds, benefit-cost analyzes and certain mandates.

Coordination and alignment

  • Harmonize grant eligibility criteria and application requirements among federal agencies and programs. Move to a single federal application, kept on file, to streamline the application process and eliminate duplication of effort.
  • Coordinate and bundle federal grants for resilience and rural development to leverage the economic benefits of climate and conservation investments.
  • Shift the burden from communities to agencies to perform certain application tasks such as compiling data needed to determine eligibility and reviewing compliance with federal rules.

Technical support and advice

  • Provide agency assistance to help rural communities navigate the complex process of obtaining federal grants.
  • Use different eligibility and reporting measures that capture vulnerability and capacity, such as demographic and local capacity.
  • Build the capacity of regional agencies and centers to better assess needs and help communities access appropriate resources; the United States Department of Agriculture’s Rural Partners Network is a good example.2

The opportunity presented by recent federal investments should not be underestimated: these resources will inspire and fund the best climate resilience projects across the country to prepare communities for disasters before they strike. The bipartisan infrastructure law also prioritizes equity in grantmaking, invests in the rural workforce, and includes programs and resources to build capacity. The recommendations offered here can improve the implementation of these historic investments by ensuring that federal assistance reaches the communities most at risk from natural disasters and least able to prepare for and respond to them. i.e. communities with limited capacities.

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President Joe Biden’s historic investments in infrastructure and climate will require building rural capacity https://preservethenati.org/president-joe-bidens-historic-investments-in-infrastructure-and-climate-will-require-building-rural-capacity-2/ Thu, 06 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/president-joe-bidens-historic-investments-in-infrastructure-and-climate-will-require-building-rural-capacity-2/ Over the past year, Congress has delivered on President Joe Biden’s vision, making potentially transformative investments in the workforce, energy systems, infrastructure, competitiveness, and resilience of American communities. However, passing laws and allocating funds are only the beginning. States, local governments, and rural leaders will need to prepare plans, apply for funding, and manage complex […]]]>

Over the past year, Congress has delivered on President Joe Biden’s vision, making potentially transformative investments in the workforce, energy systems, infrastructure, competitiveness, and resilience of American communities. However, passing laws and allocating funds are only the beginning. States, local governments, and rural leaders will need to prepare plans, apply for funding, and manage complex construction and restoration projects. All of this requires the capacity – the staff, expertise, financial resources and networks, including political influence – to follow up on funding opportunities.

Rural areas are often stretched. A natural disaster can easily overwhelm a small town’s response capacity. Infrastructure in rural areas is often already in relatively poor condition, and rural areas have fewer assets and resources to deploy before or after a natural disaster.1

The Center for American Progress recently released two reports that assess the ways in which missed opportunities in the implementation of federal resilience programs illustrate the challenges facing rural communities. Through interviews with various federal, state and local experts and officials, the reports explore how resilience funding in the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act of 2021, also known as the Bipartisan infrastructure, can better serve rural areas facing significant climate risk. While this research is based on case studies of specific programs, the reports also offer broadly applicable recommendations to policy makers when designing and implementing programs to include rural communities in climate change adaptation and recovery efforts. effects of climate change.

Read the reports in this series


Some initial solutions may include:

Ability

  • Invest up to 20% of grants in sustainable capacity building, such as hiring local and long-term staff; providing technical and leadership training; and supporting planning, outreach and peer networks so that rural communities are not isolated.
  • Target more non-competitive project funding to low-capacity rural communities using metrics that measure physical and social vulnerability and capacity.
  • Increase rural competitiveness for national grants by making small, well-designed projects eligible; allow non-governmental organizations to apply on behalf of communities and coordinate regional projects; allow states to opt out of program implementation; and waive requirements that are barriers for underfunded venues, such as matching funds, benefit-cost analyzes and certain mandates.

Coordination and alignment

  • Harmonize grant eligibility criteria and application requirements among federal agencies and programs. Move to a single federal application, kept on file, to streamline the application process and eliminate duplication of effort.
  • Coordinate and bundle federal grants for resilience and rural development to leverage the economic benefits of climate and conservation investments.
  • Shift the burden from communities to agencies to perform certain application tasks such as compiling data needed to determine eligibility and reviewing compliance with federal rules.

Technical support and advice

  • Provide agency assistance to help rural communities navigate the complex process of obtaining federal grants.
  • Use different eligibility and reporting measures that capture vulnerability and capacity, such as demographic and local capacity.
  • Build the capacity of regional agencies and centers to better assess needs and help communities access appropriate resources; the United States Department of Agriculture’s Rural Partners Network is a good example.2

The opportunity presented by recent federal investments should not be underestimated: these resources will inspire and fund the best climate resilience projects across the country to prepare communities for disasters before they strike. The bipartisan infrastructure law also prioritizes equity in grantmaking, invests in the rural workforce, and includes programs and resources to build capacity. The recommendations offered here can improve the implementation of these historic investments by ensuring that federal assistance reaches the communities most at risk from natural disasters and least able to prepare for and respond to them. i.e. communities with limited capacities.

]]>
Yuma local leader among Arizona Historic Infrastructure Board elected officials https://preservethenati.org/yuma-local-leader-among-arizona-historic-infrastructure-board-elected-officials/ Wed, 05 Oct 2022 20:43:41 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/yuma-local-leader-among-arizona-historic-infrastructure-board-elected-officials/ Arizona Governor Doug Ducey has named four water and finance experts for a new water board PHOENIX (KYMA, KECY) – Arizona Governor Doug Ducey has named four people to serve on the Water Infrastructure Finance Authority (WIFA) Board of Directors to help secure the future of water from Arizona. According to an article from Office […]]]>

Arizona Governor Doug Ducey has named four water and finance experts for a new water board

PHOENIX (KYMA, KECY) – Arizona Governor Doug Ducey has named four people to serve on the Water Infrastructure Finance Authority (WIFA) Board of Directors to help secure the future of water from Arizona.

According to an article from Office of Governor Doug Duceythe Water Infrastructure Finance Authority Board was created in 2022 and Governor Ducey signed the monumental water legislation that came into effect on September 24.

“This year, we passed the most significant water legislation in 40 years in partnership with our legislative leaders,” Governor Ducey said. “Now, with the right team, we are positioned with $1.4 billion to secure our state’s water future for the next 100 years. Members of the Water Infrastructure Finance Authority Board will be important stewards of our water resources, pursuing innovative augmentation and conservation projects. I am confident that with fresh ideas and diverse backgrounds, representing every corner of our state, we will ensure that Arizona remains a land of opportunity for families and businesses. Our appointees have the skills and experience to position our state for future success. »

Among the appointed members is local Yuma chief Jonathan Lines, who serves on the Yuma County Board of Supervisors, the Arizona-Mexico Commission, and is also president of the Arizona State Fair and Expositions. He also has extensive knowledge of water policy in rural counties. .

Lines also served as Chairman of the Arizona Republican Party and Treasurer of the Arizona Republican Party.

The other three members appointed by Governor Ducey are David Beckham, Buchanan Davis and Andy Tobin who are finance and water experts from Arizona.

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Yuma local leader among Arizona Historic Infrastructure Board elected officials https://preservethenati.org/yuma-local-leader-among-arizona-historic-infrastructure-board-elected-officials-2/ Wed, 05 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/yuma-local-leader-among-arizona-historic-infrastructure-board-elected-officials-2/ Arizona Governor Doug Ducey has named four water and finance experts for a new water board PHOENIX (KYMA, KECY) – Arizona Governor Doug Ducey has named four people to serve on the Water Infrastructure Finance Authority (WIFA) Board of Directors to help secure the future of water from Arizona. According to an article from Office […]]]>

Arizona Governor Doug Ducey has named four water and finance experts for a new water board

PHOENIX (KYMA, KECY) – Arizona Governor Doug Ducey has named four people to serve on the Water Infrastructure Finance Authority (WIFA) Board of Directors to help secure the future of water from Arizona.

According to an article from Office of Governor Doug Duceythe Water Infrastructure Finance Authority Board was created in 2022 and Governor Ducey signed the monumental water legislation that came into effect on September 24.

“This year, we passed the most significant water legislation in 40 years in partnership with our legislative leaders,” Governor Ducey said. “Now, with the right team, we are positioned with $1.4 billion to secure our state’s water future for the next 100 years. Members of the Water Infrastructure Finance Authority Board will be important stewards of our water resources, pursuing innovative augmentation and conservation projects. I am confident that with fresh ideas and diverse backgrounds, representing every corner of our state, we will ensure that Arizona remains a land of opportunity for families and businesses. Our appointees have the skills and experience to position our state for future success. »

Among the appointed members is local Yuma chief Jonathan Lines, who serves on the Yuma County Board of Supervisors, the Arizona-Mexico Commission, and is also president of the Arizona State Fair and Expositions. He also has extensive knowledge of water policy in rural counties. .

Lines also served as Chairman of the Arizona Republican Party and Treasurer of the Arizona Republican Party.

The other three members appointed by Governor Ducey are David Beckham, Buchanan Davis and Andy Tobin who are finance and water experts from Arizona.

]]>
Ryde Pier maintenance work aims to preserve historic infrastructure https://preservethenati.org/ryde-pier-maintenance-work-aims-to-preserve-historic-infrastructure/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 09:23:19 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/ryde-pier-maintenance-work-aims-to-preserve-historic-infrastructure/ Ryde Pier will see maintenance work carried out as part of a partnership between Network Rail and South Western Railway, aimed at strengthening the pier to ensure its lifespan can be extended for up to 60 years, providing key transport for the people of the Isle of Wight long into the future. This scheme will […]]]>

Ryde Pier will see maintenance work carried out as part of a partnership between Network Rail and South Western Railway, aimed at strengthening the pier to ensure its lifespan can be extended for up to 60 years, providing key transport for the people of the Isle of Wight long into the future.

This scheme will see a forced closure of the line between Ryde Esplanade and Ryde Pier Head, starting on Sunday 30 October and ending in spring 2023. This closure will affect the movement of people in the area, with SWR operating a shuttle service between Ryde Pier Head and Ryde Esplanade throughout the period.

Claire Mann, Managing Director of SWR, said:

“During our improvement program in 2021, which saw us introduce the first new trains on the Island line in over 30 years, engineers inspected Ryde Pier and found that major work was needed to continue to run the trains.

“We have worked closely with Network Rail to ensure that the necessary repairs can be carried out while causing as little disruption as possible, as we know this is an important link between the island and the services of ferry to the mainland.

“We are sorry for the inconvenience this closure will cause, but we are taking advantage of the opportunity before us by carrying out work that will provide our customers with smoother and more reliable journeys.

The pier has seen major structural decay throughout its life, as it has experienced nearly 150 years of weather erosion since its creation in 1880 by Victorian engineers. Throughout its life, the pier underwent superstructure reinforcement works in 1962, which allowed the bridge to be redone with a new steel frame, with various other repairs to come in recent years, such as the emergency maintenance in 2012 and 2013.

Due to constant repair work on different sections of the 686 meter long pier, this means that there are several different forms of construction scattered throughout the infrastructure. This creates problems for the engineering teams as they will be forced to use a variety of different methods to reinforce the pier, seeing both partial replacements and full refurbishments of the metal and timber structure.

Mark Killick, Network Rail’s Wessex Route Manager, said:

“We are delighted to finally begin work on Ryde Pier, which after 142 years of service is in dire need of maintenance to support SWR’s Island Line services in the future.

“Planning this work was very difficult as we had to work around other Island Line improvements while trying to understand the condition of the structure. Our engineers now have a very complex work program to deliver, made more difficult by the different methods of construction of the pier and the seasons in which they will be working.

“Our goal is to have everything completed by the spring of next year and we are grateful to customers for their patience during what we know will be a disruptive shutdown.”

Interested in learning more about opportunities to become a key supplier to the UK rail industry? Attend TransCityRail and access an exclusive market of buyers from Network Rail, HS2, rail operators, major contractors and all other levels of the supply chain. For more information and to reserve your place Click here.

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Ryde Pier maintenance work aims to preserve historic infrastructure https://preservethenati.org/ryde-pier-maintenance-work-aims-to-preserve-historic-infrastructure-2/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/ryde-pier-maintenance-work-aims-to-preserve-historic-infrastructure-2/ Ryde Pier will see maintenance work carried out as part of a partnership between Network Rail and South Western Railway, aimed at strengthening the pier to ensure its lifespan can be extended for up to 60 years, providing key transport for the people of the Isle of Wight long into the future. This scheme will […]]]>

Ryde Pier will see maintenance work carried out as part of a partnership between Network Rail and South Western Railway, aimed at strengthening the pier to ensure its lifespan can be extended for up to 60 years, providing key transport for the people of the Isle of Wight long into the future.

This scheme will see a forced closure of the line between Ryde Esplanade and Ryde Pier Head, starting on Sunday 30 October and ending in spring 2023. This closure will affect the movement of people in the area, with SWR operating a shuttle service between Ryde Pier Head and Ryde Esplanade throughout the period.

Claire Mann, Managing Director of SWR, said:

“During our improvement program in 2021, which saw us introduce the first new trains on the Island line in over 30 years, engineers inspected Ryde Pier and found that major work was needed to continue to run the trains.

“We have worked closely with Network Rail to ensure that the necessary repairs can be carried out while causing as little disruption as possible, as we know this is an important link between the island and the services of ferry to the mainland.

“We are sorry for the inconvenience this closure will cause, but we are taking advantage of the opportunity before us by carrying out work that will provide our customers with smoother and more reliable journeys.

The pier has seen major structural decay throughout its life, as it has experienced nearly 150 years of weather erosion since its creation in 1880 by Victorian engineers. Throughout its life, the pier underwent superstructure reinforcement works in 1962, which allowed the bridge to be redone with a new steel frame, with various other repairs to come in recent years, such as the emergency maintenance in 2012 and 2013.

Due to constant repair work on different sections of the 686 meter long pier, this means that there are several different forms of construction scattered throughout the infrastructure. This creates problems for the engineering teams as they will be forced to use a variety of different methods to reinforce the pier, seeing both partial replacements and full refurbishments of the metal and timber structure.

Mark Killick, Network Rail’s Wessex Route Manager, said:

“We are delighted to finally begin work on Ryde Pier, which after 142 years of service is in dire need of maintenance to support SWR’s Island Line services in the future.

“Planning this work was very difficult as we had to work around other Island Line improvements while trying to understand the condition of the structure. Our engineers now have a very complex work program to deliver, made more difficult by the different methods of construction of the pier and the seasons in which they will be working.

“Our goal is to have everything completed by the spring of next year and we are grateful to customers for their patience during what we know will be a disruptive shutdown.”

Interested in learning more about opportunities to become a key supplier to the UK rail industry? Attend TransCityRail and access an exclusive market of buyers from Network Rail, HS2, rail operators, major contractors and all other levels of the supply chain. For more information and to reserve your place Click here.

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Free Articles Limit Reached – The Waterways Journal https://preservethenati.org/free-articles-limit-reached-the-waterways-journal/ Fri, 26 Aug 2022 15:50:51 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/free-articles-limit-reached-the-waterways-journal/ Thank you for visiting the Waterways Journal website. We hope you enjoyed your three free articles this week. As you may already know, we now charge for unlimited access to our content. You can come back next week and access three more free articles or choose unlimited access with a digital subscription and continue to […]]]>

Thank you for visiting the Waterways Journal website.

We hope you enjoyed your three free articles this week.

As you may already know, we now charge for unlimited access to our content. You can come back next week and access three more free articles or choose unlimited access with a digital subscription and continue to stay up to date on Homeland Navy news anytime, anywhere and on any device. . Subscribing is quick and easy.

To continue reading, register now or log in.


Subscribe now online

All access to the Print and Digital editions of the Waterways Journal for only $45 per year. Your paper subscription will start arriving in 2-3 weeks with digital access provided immediately.

All access to the Print and Digital editions of the Waterways Journal for two years for $80. Your paper subscription will start arriving in 2-3 weeks with digital access provided immediately.

All access to the Print and Digital editions of the Waterways Journal for three years for $115. Your paper subscription will start arriving in 2-3 weeks with digital access provided immediately.

If you are currently a WJ print subscriber, you now have free access to the website. Simply select this option and we’ll verify your information and activate your account within 24-72 hours. You will receive a confirmation when your access has been approved.


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Free Articles Limit Reached – The Waterways Journal https://preservethenati.org/free-articles-limit-reached-the-waterways-journal-2/ Fri, 26 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/free-articles-limit-reached-the-waterways-journal-2/ Thank you for visiting the Waterways Journal website. We hope you enjoyed your three free articles this week. As you may already know, we now charge for unlimited access to our content. You can come back next week and access three more free articles or choose unlimited access with a digital subscription and continue to […]]]>

Thank you for visiting the Waterways Journal website.

We hope you enjoyed your three free articles this week.

As you may already know, we now charge for unlimited access to our content. You can come back next week and access three more free articles or choose unlimited access with a digital subscription and continue to stay up to date on Homeland Navy news anytime, anywhere and on any device. . Subscribing is quick and easy.

To continue reading, register now or Login.


Subscribe now online

All access to the Print and Digital editions of the Waterways Journal for only $45 per year. Your paper subscription will start arriving in 2-3 weeks with digital access provided immediately.

All access to the Print and Digital editions of the Waterways Journal for two years for $80. Your paper subscription will start arriving in 2-3 weeks with digital access provided immediately.

All access to the Print and Digital editions of the Waterways Journal for three years for $115. Your paper subscription will start arriving in 2-3 weeks with digital access provided immediately.

If you are currently a WJ print subscriber, you now have free access to the website. Simply select this option and we’ll verify your information and activate your account within 24-72 hours. You will receive a confirmation when your access has been approved.


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