Historic infrastructure – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ Tue, 10 May 2022 01:06:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://preservethenati.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/nati.png Historic infrastructure – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ 32 32 San Antonio voters approve investment in historic infrastructure and affordable housing through $1.2 billion bond program – City of San Antonio https://preservethenati.org/san-antonio-voters-approve-investment-in-historic-infrastructure-and-affordable-housing-through-1-2-billion-bond-program-city-of-san-antonio/ Sat, 07 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/san-antonio-voters-approve-investment-in-historic-infrastructure-and-affordable-housing-through-1-2-billion-bond-program-city-of-san-antonio/ CONTACT: Laura Mayes laura.mayes@sanantonio.gov210-207-1337 SAN ANTONIO (May 7, 2022) – Voters today approved the largest bond program in the city’s history. The $1.2 billion bond program invests in San Antonio’s infrastructure and resilience. The 2022 – 2027 bond program does not require an increase in the City’s property tax. As part of the bond program, […]]]>

CONTACT: Laura Mayes
laura.mayes@sanantonio.gov
210-207-1337

SAN ANTONIO (May 7, 2022) – Voters today approved the largest bond program in the city’s history. The $1.2 billion bond program invests in San Antonio’s infrastructure and resilience. The 2022 – 2027 bond program does not require an increase in the City’s property tax. As part of the bond program, voters also approved the first-ever Housing Affordability Bond proposal that will produce and preserve affordable, permanent supportive housing.

“The 2022-2027 bond program is making historic investments in all areas of the community, with a focus on neighborhoods. 76% of the funding is dedicated to improving our streets, sidewalks, drainage and parks,” said City Manager Erik Walsh. “For the first time ever, the City will also invest bond dollars to create and preserve much-needed affordable housing. No matter where you live, the bond program will improve your community. Voters agreed that there is a huge need in our community and that the City will act quickly to make the 183 projects a reality.
The $1.2 billion voter-approved bond package includes six proposals, 183 projects and includes record funding for public art. The bond program will also invest in the production and preservation of affordable, permanent supportive housing.

The 2022-2027 voter-approved bond program is spending 53% of its dollars on street and drainage infrastructure projects. Improvements also include a planned 21 miles of new linear greenway trails, $15.7 million for public art, improvements to city parks including the addition of nine new park properties, $68 million $ in renovations to municipal libraries, community centers and cultural facilities and $65 million in new construction of municipal facilities, including new public safety facilities and a $150 million investment in affordable housing.

For more information on the city’s 2022-2027 bond program, visit http://www.sanantonio.gov/2022Bond.

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Small towns seek to compete for historic infrastructure funds https://preservethenati.org/small-towns-seek-to-compete-for-historic-infrastructure-funds/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 18:17:44 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/small-towns-seek-to-compete-for-historic-infrastructure-funds/ Last November, Congress passed the $1.2 trillion mark. infrastructure legislationputting a historic amount of money into municipal pockets to fund pipelines, bridges, broadband and more. During the last decade, nearly $10 billion in infrastructure funding was allocated through a discretionary grants program that was founded in 2009 as part of the Obama administration’s Great Recession […]]]>

Last November, Congress passed the $1.2 trillion mark. infrastructure legislationputting a historic amount of money into municipal pockets to fund pipelines, bridges, broadband and more.

During the last decade, nearly $10 billion in infrastructure funding was allocated through a discretionary grants program that was founded in 2009 as part of the Obama administration’s Great Recession stimulus package. Known today as the RAISE grants, the program awarded funds to 90 rural and urban centers nationwide in 2021. While half of the funds were directed to rural projects, experts say municipalities were turned away due to funding limits, and it’s been difficult for smaller, low-resource communities to build competitive apps that receive funding.

Yonah Freemark, senior research associate at the Urban Institute, sees a strong need in communities across the country to receive help applying for these grants, noting that federal grants have complicated proposals that can cost a lot of money. money to develop.

“Not every city is New York or Chicago, with the resources and personnel to come together with this kind of big proposal,” Freemark said. “So more needs to be done to fill the void and ensure that every community can benefit from the grant money.”

The Biden administration hopes to address this inequity with a new publication 465-page guide that tells cities how to apply for these funds.

Jill Boudreau, mayor of Mount Vernon, Wash., said her small rural town of more than 35,000 people had avoided federal funding for at least 15 years because community leaders didn’t believe she had the resources to hire grant writers. to complete the complex application process and compete for the grant. But she’s impressed with the federal government’s recent guidelines, which she says are the clearest instructions she’s seen.

In 2021, Boudreau submitted his very first grant application. Although the project was not selected, Boudreau said in an email that his project “literally checks all the requirements” of the new US Department of Transportation (DOT). Notice of Funding Opportunity for RAISE grants, so she is reapplying in 2022.

Mount Vernon is competing for electric vehicle (EV) infrastructure funding with a $46 million proposal for a 275-space parking lot with 75 EV charging stations serving a mixed-use public building called Mount Vernon Library Commons, which includes a library, community center, and commercial kitchen, Boudreau said. If built, she said, Mount Vernon, conveniently located along the Interstate 5 corridor between Seattle, Washington, and Vancouver, British Columbia, would host one of the world’s largest public charging centers. in the USA.

“Most of the time, it seems like the ‘ready-to-go’ projects are the best,” Boudreau said, noting that electric vehicle infrastructure could be built in 18 months. “I now have great hope because of the amounts invested in these grant programs. Our county will see a big difference.”

Brittney Kohler, legislative director for transportation and infrastructure at the National League of Cities, has some recommendations for cities like Mount Vernon preparing to receive funding: First, establish a community’s most important needs. , then prioritize essential projects that the community cannot complete without additional funds. Support. Cities must find a match for their proposal within the 375 grant programs available — specialize in projects like drinking water, bridges or bike paths — before collecting data, identifying stakeholders and reaching out to potential partner organizations. Once their documents are in order, communities must determine who to contact for their specific request and what deadlines must be met.

More importantly, if their project fails in early rounds of funding, Kohler said it’s important to remember that there’s five years of funding available under the infrastructure bill, so municipalities can resubmit five times.

“Now is the time to showcase old projects, dust off applications, and tell the stories of economic growth and recovery our country wants to see in a post-COVID-19 world,” Kohler said. “Let’s be honest, so many of the applications that the DOT had to turn down were turned down not on the merit of the project, but because they didn’t have enough money for everyone, and that changed with the introduction of this law project.”

Kohler’s biggest message to local communities is that they have a new chance to receive far more competitive funding than city officials have ever seen before. “They will definitely be considered, but we want them to prepare, and prepare soon, so they don’t miss an opportunity to improve their communities.”

While small towns like Mount Vernon have embraced this new chance, Boudreau said she was “still concerned” that grants would be funneled to towns with more resources or staff, even if councils had “a great intention”. Boudreau is a “100 percent” believer in setting aside funds exclusively for rural jurisdictions, but said she would be happy with a short DOT consultation just to determine if her city is on the right track.

Instead of this help, like other cities in the country, Mount Vernon recently hired a lobbyist. “It’s a small-town expense,” Boudreau wrote, “but we’re a long way from Washington, D.C.”

Kohler compared hiring lobbyists for community representation to hiring for other municipal needs, like snow removal, waste hauling or cybersecurity networks. “They are looking for people to help them find projects, match them and support the process, but it’s not something that has to be done. It’s something they choose to do,” said Kohler said.

But leaders like Boudreau believe it’s a big investment. “We are so behind in infrastructure funding in this country. So far, funding has gone to bigger impact projects with high prices,” she said. But with the latest bill, “we have a chance to make progress on needs. Notice I didn’t say ‘catch up’ – just progress.”

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Historic Infrastructure Funding Opportunities Open to Local Governments https://preservethenati.org/historic-infrastructure-funding-opportunities-open-to-local-governments/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 19:56:28 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/historic-infrastructure-funding-opportunities-open-to-local-governments/ February 14, 2022 through Eric Lowell Category: Financing of public works On November 15, 2021, the bipartisan infrastructure bill says Building a better America has been enacted. This bill invests more than $400 billion over five years to repair roads and bridges and support major transportation projects. Building a better America provides for […]]]>

February 14, 2022
through

Eric Lowell



Category:

Financing of public works


On November 15, 2021, the bipartisan infrastructure bill says Building a better America has been enacted. This bill invests more than $400 billion over five years to repair roads and bridges and support major transportation projects.


Building a better America provides for several different funding mechanisms. A portion will be provided to states while other funding is available through a competitive grant process. The White House released a 465-page report guide which contains information on the thirteen funding areas with information on where and how to apply for the different programs. If necessary, the White House will release subsequent versions of the guide with all updated details and timelines.


Funding goal


Funding for Building a Better America has been distributed among the following program areas:


  • Transport

    • Roads, bridges and major projects
    • Passenger and freight rail transport
    • Public transport
    • Federal Aviation Administration airports and facilities
    • Ports and waterways
    • Security
    • Electric vehicles, buses and ferries

  • Climate, energy and environment

    • Clean energy and electricity
    • The water
    • Resilience
    • Environmental remediation

  • Broadband
  • Other programs

    • Programs of the regional commissions
    • Department of Commerce, Agriculture and Energy Programs
    • Departments of Health and Human Services and Interior Programs
    • Department of Transportation Programs
    • Environmental Protection Agency programs
    • Solid waste management and recycling


The White House also released a fact sheet which contains 25 competitive grant opportunities for local governments. Some of these competitive grants are already open and have application deadlines. Many more will open in the first quarter of 2022, while more will open later in 2022. It is imperative that local governments wishing to apply start planning now. If your agency is not yet registered with Grants.gov (the Federal Grants Application Portal), note that registration takes two to four weeks and is the first step in the process.


Grant Opportunities


This funding program is currently open and accept applications: Grants for the Sustainable and Equitable Reconstruction of American Infrastructure (RAISE). RAISE provides $7.5 billion for transportation infrastructure projects, including road, rail, transit, and other surface transportation of local and/or regional importance. Transport projects will be selected based on safety, environmental sustainability, quality of life, competitiveness and economic opportunity, state of good repair, partnerships and innovation. Local governments interested in funding should consult the Notice of Funding Opportunity to find out how to apply. Applications must be submitted no later than 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST) on April 15, 2022.


Grant opportunities: first quarter of 2022


These grant programs are not currently open, but are planned to be in the first quarter of this year (i.e. until March 2022).


Subsidies for the development of port infrastructures includes $2 billion in grants to fund the modernization and expansion of U.S. ports to eliminate supply chain bottlenecks, ensure long-term competitiveness, resilience and sustainability while reducing impacts on the environment and nearby communities.


Subsidies for buses and bus facilities includes $2 billion in grants to replace, rehabilitate, purchase or lease buses and bus-related equipment and to rehabilitate, purchase, build or lease bus-related facilities – as well as capital funding for projects to low- or zero-emission buses.


National Infrastructure Project Assistance (also known as “megaprojects” or MEGA) provides $5 billion in grants for multimodal, multijurisdictional projects of regional or national significance. Communities wishing to complete large, critical projects that would otherwise be unachievable without outside assistance are eligible to apply for funding. The information is not currently available on the transport department (DOT), but it should be released during this month.


The Rural Surface Transportation Grant program provides $2 billion in grants to improve and expand surface transportation infrastructure in rural areas, increase connectivity, improve the safety and reliability of the movement of people and goods, and generate economic growth regional. As with the MEGA funding program, the DOT website will post further details as they become available.


Grant Opportunities: Spring 2022 and Beyond


These grant programs are should open after the first quarter of this year (i.e. after March 2022).


Safe Streets and Roads for All includes $5 billion in grants for local and tribal governments exclusively to support their efforts to advance “vision zero» blueprints and others complete streets improvements to reduce accidents and fatalities, especially for cyclists and pedestrians. keep an eye on DOT website for further details.


the ReConnect Loan and Grant Program provides $2 billion in loans and grants for projects that broadband in rural areas. This is an existing program made available by the Department of Agriculture. The current application window ends February 22, 2022, but the next grant application window opens in the third quarter of 2022.


The Middle Mile Grants Program includes $1 billion in grants through the US Department of Commerce for the construction, improvement or acquisition of mid-mile broadband infrastructure. Applications are expected to open in the second quarter of 2022 and information will be available on the department’s website.


The State and Local Cybersecurity Grants Program provides $1 billion in grants to address cybersecurity risks and threats to information systems that state and local governments own or operate. Applications will likely open in the third quarter of 2022. As with the Middle Mile Grant Program, information about this grant opportunity will be posted by the US Department of Commerce.


How local governments can prepare


The White House has encouraged local governments to begin planning the bid process in their departments, as well as coordinate bid efforts with their metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs).


As part of this planning, a local government should:


  1. Prioritize your community’s capital needs and develop a pipeline of projects by taking the time to think about projects previously considered impossible due to a lack of funding or regional coordination. This is a once-in-a-generation funding opportunity that will require bold and inclusive thinking.
  2. Use the next guide to bipartisan infrastructure law to identify federal funding sources to target.
  3. Make sure that all transit, rail, road, highway and bridge projects are part of your DFO’s transportation improvement plan.
  4. Begin mapping sites for electric vehicle charging stations and alternative fuel sites.
  5. Make an inventory and map of lead pipes in your jurisdiction. Read through the Lead Pipe and Paint Action Plan additional federal resources for this effort.
  6. Work with your state’s broadband agency to ensure that the needs in your jurisdiction or region are mapped and inventoried appropriately.
  7. Build relationships with regional offices of key federal agencies that can help direct you to resources and provide technical assistance.


Additionally, the White House will be offering a series of Infrastructure Schools webinars over the coming weeks to give local governments an in-depth look at the funding opportunities available for the various areas of the infrastructure program. Local governments should plan to register for the appropriate webinars to take full advantage of these unique funding opportunities. Registration is currently open for webinars in the following program areas:




Registration for other webinars will open soon. For more information on grant opportunities and to sign up for updates, visit Building a better America.


MRSC is a private, nonprofit organization serving local governments in Washington State. Eligible Washington State government agencies can use our free, one-on-one Ask MRSC service to get answers to legal, policy, or financial questions.

About Eric Lowell

Eric Lowell joined MRSC in December 2020 as a financial consultant. He has been involved in local government finance for over 13 years, including municipal government as well as a special purpose district.

Eric holds a BA in Secondary Education from Arizona State University and a BS in Accounting from Central Washington University.

SEE ALL MESSAGES BY Eric Lowell

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Congresswoman Bonnie Watson Coleman Raises Historic Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act https://preservethenati.org/congresswoman-bonnie-watson-coleman-raises-historic-infrastructure-investment-and-jobs-act/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 07:02:57 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/congresswoman-bonnie-watson-coleman-raises-historic-infrastructure-investment-and-jobs-act/ MP Bonnie Watson Coleman (NJ-12) met with state and local government officials on Friday including New Jersey Treasurer Elizabeth Muoio, Mercer County Director Brian Hughes, City of Trenton Mayor Reed Gusciora, New Jersey MP Verlina Reynolds Jackson and New Jersey. Assembly Member Anthony Verreli, to discuss some of the great opportunities that the Infrastructure Investment […]]]>


MP Bonnie Watson Coleman (NJ-12) met with state and local government officials on Friday including New Jersey Treasurer Elizabeth Muoio, Mercer County Director Brian Hughes, City of Trenton Mayor Reed Gusciora, New Jersey MP Verlina Reynolds Jackson and New Jersey. Assembly Member Anthony Verreli, to discuss some of the great opportunities that the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act offers our local communities.

The historic bipartite infrastructure agreement (Law on Investment in Infrastructure and Jobs) passed by Congress in November 2021, represents a unique investment in the country’s infrastructure and competitiveness. “With the recent passage of the Infrastructure Investments and Jobs Act, we can finally embark on major infrastructure projects that have been postponed for far too long here in the capital, here in Mercer County and even in our state, ”Watson Coleman said. . “This landmark bipartisan infrastructure law will improve the lives of millions of New Jersey residents, create a generation of well-paying union jobs, and spur economic growth.”

In July 2021, Bonnie Watson Coleman announced the passage of two targeted infrastructure projects for the City of Trenton through the House Appropriations Committee. Together with the previously adopted Highway 29 Tunnel Transport and Infrastructure (T&I) project, these initiatives represent significant infrastructure improvements.

Representative Watson Coleman announces $ 3.9 million investment in Trenton infrastructure

The infrastructure deal will rebuild America’s roads, bridges and railroads, expand access to clean water, ensure every American has access to high-speed internet, tackle the climate crisis , advance environmental justice and invest in communities too often left behind. . The legislation will help ease inflationary pressures and strengthen supply chains by making long-awaited improvements to our country’s ports, airports, railways and roads. It will stimulate the creation of well-paying union jobs and grow the economy in a sustainable and equitable manner so that everyone can progress for decades to come. Combined with the President’s Build Back Framework, it will add an average of 1.5 million jobs per year over the next 10 years. (Source: White House Information Room https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/statements-releases/2021/11/06/fact-sheet-the-bipartisan-infrastructure-deal)

Watson Coleman spoke about a number of impacts of the bill, including improvements to the Trenton-Mercer airport, job creation and the improvement and reimagining of Highway 29, both the tunnel and pavement. “Today, every truck has to exit Highway 29 before reaching the tunnel, then through residential neighborhoods. It is an unhealthy problem for these communities in terms of safety, emissions and efficiency… This bill will address these problems by remedying some of these negative impacts on our climate and on our communities.

The bill will expand access to drinking water for households, businesses, schools and daycares across the country; ensure that every American has access to reliable high-speed internet; rebuilding roads and bridges with a focus on climate change mitigation, resilience, equity and safety for all users; improve transportation options for millions of Americans and reduce greenhouse gas emissions with the largest investment in public transit in US history; modernizing the country’s airports and ports to strengthen our supply chains and avoid the disruptions that have caused inflation; and make the largest investment in passenger rail since the inception of Amtrak.

The bill will also build a nationwide network of electric vehicle (EV) chargers; modernize our electrical infrastructure to provide clean and reliable energy across the country and deploy cutting-edge energy technology to achieve a zero-emission future; make our infrastructure resilient to the impacts of climate change, cyber attacks and extreme weather events; and make the biggest investment in legacy pollution control in American history by cleaning up Superfund sites and brownfields, reclaiming abandoned mines and plugging orphaned oil and gas wells.


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Biden hits the road to sell historic infrastructure law https://preservethenati.org/biden-hits-the-road-to-sell-historic-infrastructure-law/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/biden-hits-the-road-to-sell-historic-infrastructure-law/ When President Obama passed the Affordable Care Act in 2010, then Vice President Joe Biden was on his side. Months later, Biden watched with Obama as the Democrats suffer huge losses at the federal and state levels in the midterm elections. Now Biden is the one to sell historic legislation to the American people ahead […]]]>


When President Obama passed the Affordable Care Act in 2010, then Vice President Joe Biden was on his side. Months later, Biden watched with Obama as the Democrats suffer huge losses at the federal and state levels in the midterm elections.

Now Biden is the one to sell historic legislation to the American people ahead of what should be another grim midterm season for Democrats. This time around, it’s the $ 1.2 trillion infrastructure bill, the biggest such federal investment in decades – and the biggest ever in some sectors. And Biden hopes soon to promote passage of his massive social spending framework, now blocked in Congress, which would fund clean energy, child care, tax credits, affordable housing, extended care. health and other initiatives.

The challenge, then and now, is how to sell voters plans that they might not see the benefits of for several years.

Two days after enacting the infrastructure bill, Biden made his goodwill tour of General Motors’ electric vehicle assembly plant in Detroit, where he took a test drive with an electric SUV and said : “This Hummer is a hell of a vehicle.”

Biden said the infrastructure law will invest $ 7.5 billion in expanding the infrastructure of electric vehicle charging stations. While lawmakers are still crafting the final outlines of the “Build Back Better” social spending plan, the president maintained that the $ 1.85 trillion proposal would help boost U.S. manufacturing of electric vehicles and deliver. to consumers tax credits to buy them.

“We’re going to make sure the jobs of the future end up here in Michigan, not halfway around the world,” said the president, who was joined on Wednesday by members of the Michigan congressional delegation, the director GM General Mary Barra, United Auto Workers President Ray Curry and Labor Secretary Marty Walsh.

While Biden’s speech on Wednesday highlighted the impact the two major initiatives would have on the auto industry, the environment and union job creation, on Tuesday he focused on basic infrastructure critical to the Rural America: roads, high-speed internet and water supply systems.

Standing on an 82-year-old bridge over the Pemigewasset River in Woodstock, New Hampshire, Biden argued that the bill meets the basic needs of people living in small towns in America.

“These are real things,” Biden told about 30 residents as snow fell on his face. “What does it mean if a school bus or water treatment trucks or log trucks can’t cross?” It means jobs. It means time. It means energy. Without access to the bridge, the local fire department would have to travel 10 miles to reach the community, he said.

The bipartisan legislation is a much-needed victory for Biden, who continues to face fighting within the party over his landmark social safety net bill amid the ongoing pandemic and inflation in largely due to supply chain issues.

Biden’s infrastructure tour comes as the House prepares to vote on the Build Back Better plan. While the impact of this bill is more immediate, it is likely to spill over entirely to Democratic votes, leaving Biden more open to Republican overspending attacks.

He has seen his approval ratings drop even as the Democratic agenda remains popular. In a Washington Post-ABC poll released on Nov. 14, 63% of those polled supported the $ 1,000 billion infrastructure investment, but only 39% approved of Biden’s way of handling the economy. Its overall approval rate is 41%, down from 52% in April.

As the president’s motorcade passed through rural New Hampshire on Tuesday, it was greeted with pro-Trump and anti-Biden placards, with some reading “The Mandates are 4 Greed and Power,” a reference to the rules imposed to fight COVID -19. Just down the road from the bridge where Biden spoke, at least one protester was heard chanting “Let’s go, Brandon,” a slogan that has become the Conservative code for a vulgar anti-Biden statement.

“What I think he needs to do is pretty much what they’re doing already, and it hit the road and started selling this thing all over the country,” said Jim Manley, who was a senior staff member of former Senate Majority Leader Harry. Reid (D-Nev.). Manley has been instrumental in helping with the message and strategy around the Affordable Care Act.

“One thing we’ve learned from Obamacare is that you can’t promise too much,” Manley said. “But you have to figure out how exactly to show people that they are going to benefit from what has just been adopted. “

Obamacare’s political journey is a reminder of both the importance of messages and the long game politicians must play while they wait to see how the public receives their legislation. Republican criticism of the Affordable Care Act – including fears of rising costs and the loss of beloved doctors and false rumors of “death groups” – dominated the midterm elections of 2010 and 2014.

However, during the 2018 midterm cycle, protecting Obamacare from future repeal attempts was a key part of the Democrats’ successful efforts to recapture the House. As president, Biden was able to strengthen healthcare law by reducing premium costs through the American Rescue Act.

“The White House and many Democrats will certainly be frustrated with the discrepancy in the time it takes for people to feel the benefits of things,” said Jeremy Rosner, managing partner of GQR, a Democratic polling company. “But the Obamacare case shows that at some point sound policy on things that touch people’s lives – like health care, roads or child care, things like that – at the end of the day. counts … helps as messengers and becomes strong assets. “

That’s little comfort for Democrats heading into next year’s midterm election, a lesson Republicans learned in 2018.

“We were hoping that tax reform would be the silver bullet to allow us to keep the House,” said Matt Gorman, a GOP strategist who was communications director for the Republican campaign arm of the House during the last election cycle of the House. mid-term. “While I’m glad we did – it was good policy – it certainly wasn’t that quick fix.”

House Democrats overturned control of 41 GOP seats in 2018. Vulnerable House Republicans had hoped their legislative victories would distract from the controversies surrounding President Trump, but the tax review alone did not It wasn’t enough to get through a year that included a government shutdown, the investigation into Russia, family separation on the US-Mexico border, and legal troubles for various collaborators.

Gorman said Republicans would likely describe Biden as a “spectator,” not a leader, on events such as Afghanistan, the border and inflation.

“You can’t reverse a huge trend with just one piece of legislation,” Gorman said.

Historically, the president’s party has tended to lose seats in Congress in midterm elections. The 2022 map – currently being redesigned based on the 2020 census – will likely favor House Republicans, according to several analyzes. And House Democrats in some competitive districts, such as those of Kentucky’s John Yarmuth and Arizona’s Ann Kirkpatrick, have announced plans to retire.

Unlike the Health Bill, the Infrastructure Bill, which won the support of 19 Republicans in the Senate and 13 in the House, is likely to retain its popularity. The challenge for administration messaging is distinguishing what can be done now and what will not be ready for months or years. Officials stressed that this was not a 2009 stimulus bill designed for immediate effect. While some funds will be directed to existing programs, many projects will only be at the planning stage a year from now.

Asked about the implementation of the law’s $ 65 billion broadband service plan, Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo told reporters earlier this month communities would see “activity and action “before the midterm elections next year, but that it would take” a number of months. ” for projects to take off.

“Getting it right is more important than rushing,” said Raimondo. “I think people will see their state come up with a plan; they will see us start to move forward on this plan. But you know, not everyone will have broadband in a year.

This week, several members of the administration, including Vice President Kamala Harris, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Michael S. Regan, and Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg are deploying to the Red and Blue States. of the country to promote the bill. The stops include a mix of politically important regions; urban areas such as San Francisco, Atlanta and Columbus, Ohio; and cities such as New Orleans, where Regan will highlight the law’s environmental justice funding.

On Tuesday, Biden delved into the specific problems the law was supposed to address in places like Woodstock, which has a population of around 1,300. He noted that the bridge he stood on, on New Hampshire’s Highway 175, “has been structurally deficient for years,” with the maximum allowable weight on the bridge dropping from 40 to 20 tons as the state spent a quarter of a million dollars for “Pansic” repairs.

The infrastructure act will speed up major repairs on bridges by at least a year, many of them on roads in small towns like Woodstock, he said.

“My message to the people of New Hampshire is simple,” he said. “Thanks to this delegation, New Hampshire and America are on the move again. Your life will change for the better. And it is literal.

John reported from Los Angeles and Logan from New Hampshire.


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Plumbing Manufacturers International Applauds Signing of Historic Infrastructure Investment Program https://preservethenati.org/plumbing-manufacturers-international-applauds-signing-of-historic-infrastructure-investment-program/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 17:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/plumbing-manufacturers-international-applauds-signing-of-historic-infrastructure-investment-program/ WASHINGTON–(COMMERCIAL THREAD) – Plumbing Manufacturers International (PMI) congratulates Congress on coming together to adopt the historic, bipartisan infrastructure package, which was enacted by President Joe Biden yesterday. PMI CEO / Executive Director Kerry Stackpole said PMI welcomes the passage of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA), HR 3684, the country’s largest infrastructure investment in […]]]>


WASHINGTON–(COMMERCIAL THREAD) – Plumbing Manufacturers International (PMI) congratulates Congress on coming together to adopt the historic, bipartisan infrastructure package, which was enacted by President Joe Biden yesterday.

PMI CEO / Executive Director Kerry Stackpole said PMI welcomes the passage of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA), HR 3684, the country’s largest infrastructure investment in decades. “The law sets in motion critical steps to modernize our country’s aging infrastructure and includes significant investments in our drinking water supply and sanitation systems,” Stackpole said. “Investing and modernizing our country’s infrastructure is essential to the country’s long-term economic growth and will significantly improve access to clean water and improved sanitation.

The IIJA makes generational investments of over $ 550 billion in new spending for priorities such as water infrastructure, roads, highways, bridges, ports, airports, railways, public transportation. common, pollution mitigation, as well as power grid upgrade, broadband, cybersecurity, and more.

The water infrastructure portion of the package includes more than $ 50 billion in funding for rural towns, as well as for Native American and underserved communities. PMI advocated for funding water efficiency, water conservation and reuse from the law, as well as significant improvements to water supply and wastewater systems to be covered. by law, in particular:

  • $ 48.4 billion over five years for spending on drinking water and wastewater.

  • $ 15 billion to support the replacement of main service lines.

  • Funding of $ 200 million to fight lead testing and sanitation in drinking water systems in schools and daycares.

  • $ 48 million for national water reuse programs and $ 1 billion for funding Western water reuse programs. It also creates an interagency working group on water reuse.

  • $ 400 million for water efficiency in western states through the Bureau of Reclamation’s Water Smart Grants Program.

  • $ 10 billion to help drinking water and sanitation systems tackle emerging contaminants like PFAS and to enable the purchase of certified point-of-entry or point-of-use filters and filtrations that will help to remove harmful contaminants from drinking water.

  • $ 3.5 billion for the construction of new sanitation facilities for Native American communities, including water, sewage and solid waste systems.

PMI thanks all the legislators in the House and Senate who voted for this vast array of infrastructure. “We look forward to the implementation of the IIJA, which will support major public works projects for the most needy water supply systems and provide jobs and economic growth at a critical time,” Stackpole said. . “We commend President Biden for his efforts to make better reconstruction and infrastructure renewal the centerpiece of his administration’s first year in office. ”

About Plumbing Manufacturers International

Plumbing Manufacturers International (PMI) is the trade association of plumbing product manufacturers that produce over 90% of plumbing products in the United States, represent over 150 iconic brands, and develop safe, reliable and innovative plumbing technologies that are economical. in water. PMI members contribute more than 464,000 jobs and an $ 85.5 billion economic impact on the US economy.

With a vision of safe and responsible plumbing – always, PMI advocates the performance of plumbing products contributing to water efficiency and savings, sustainability, public health and safety, and consumer satisfaction. PMI members manufacture water-efficient toilets, urinals, faucets, shower heads and other products at more than 70 locations across the country and market them online and in more than 24,000 home improvement stores , hardware stores and showrooms in all 50 states. For more information on PMI, contact the organization at 1750 Tysons Blvd., Ste. 1500, McLean, Virginia, 22102; Phone. : 847-481-5500. www.safeplumbing.org


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Investing in Historic Infrastructure to Benefit Native Americans in Three Key Ways https://preservethenati.org/investing-in-historic-infrastructure-to-benefit-native-americans-in-three-key-ways/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 12:47:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/investing-in-historic-infrastructure-to-benefit-native-americans-in-three-key-ways/ “I am delighted that the IIJA reinforces our responsibility as a nation to honor the responsibility of the Indian Federal Trust and the Biden Administration’s commitment to equity and environmental justice as we rebuild better , especially with regard to tribal nations, “said Executive director Christine Harada. The Permits Board administers Title 41 of the […]]]>


“I am delighted that the IIJA reinforces our responsibility as a nation to honor the responsibility of the Indian Federal Trust and the Biden Administration’s commitment to equity and environmental justice as we rebuild better , especially with regard to tribal nations, “said Executive director Christine Harada.

The Permits Board administers Title 41 of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (FAST-41) and establishes best practices for the licensing of infrastructure across the federal government. As part of the IIJA, the Permitting Council will help ensure that infrastructure investments benefit communities across the country of India in the following ways:

  • Infrastructure projects sponsored by tribal entities and located on tribal lands will have increased access to the benefits of FAST-41, which include transparent, public authorization timelines and increased access to federal decision makers regarding their projects..
  • The Executive Director of the Permits Board will be authorized to transfer funds directly to the tribes to participate in the federal review and authorization of infrastructure projects affecting the tribe, thereby alleviating the financial burden of participating in the review of the tribes. projects..
  • The IIJA directs the 13 member agencies of the Permit Council to develop new government-wide best practices to improve the early engagement of agencies and project developers with tribal governments to identify potential impacts on communities. natural, archaeological and cultural resources of infrastructure projects authorized by the federal government..

Large, complex infrastructure projects can impact the land and cultural resources of any of the 574 American and Alaskan Indian tribes and villages recognized by the federal government in the United States. Tribal involvement in the infrastructure developed on tribal lands.

The Permits Council has successfully implemented the recommendations of the U.S. Government Accountability Office Report 2019 to help federal agencies ensure that their policies better communicate how they view tribal contribution in decision-making for proposed infrastructure projects. And he continues to rely on his Best Practices Report 2021 for high quality nation-to-nation engagement on infrastructure projects through its Tribal Initiative. The initiative includes providing government-wide training for more effective nation-to-nation engagement, organizing nation-to-nation consultations with White House and Permit Council officials, and facilitating the government-wide expansion of Tribal Directory Assistance Tool.

In addition, the The Biden administration is committed to regularly and meaningfully consulting with tribal leaders when formulating federal policy that affects tribal nations..

Learn more about the Directing Council for Federal Licensing Improvement.

Learn more about Title 41 of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (FAST-41).

SOURCE Permits Council

Related links

https://www.permits.performance.gov/


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Nevada receives $ 4 billion from ‘historic’ infrastructure bill https://preservethenati.org/nevada-receives-4-billion-from-historic-infrastructure-bill/ Tue, 16 Nov 2021 00:24:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/nevada-receives-4-billion-from-historic-infrastructure-bill/ LAS VEGAS (KTNV) – President Joe Biden signed a $ 1,000 billion infrastructure package on Monday, and about $ 4 billion of that money will be used here in Nevada. PREVIOUS: Biden Signs Infrastructure Bill in White House Ceremony Gov. Steve Sisolak celebrated the news with a press release, calling the package “historic” and writing […]]]>


LAS VEGAS (KTNV) – President Joe Biden signed a $ 1,000 billion infrastructure package on Monday, and about $ 4 billion of that money will be used here in Nevada.

PREVIOUS: Biden Signs Infrastructure Bill in White House Ceremony

Gov. Steve Sisolak celebrated the news with a press release, calling the package “historic” and writing that it “will improve the lives of millions of Nevada residents, create a generation of well-paying union jobs and growth. economic, and position the United States to win the 21st century. ”

The package includes:

  • $ 2.5 billion for federal assistance programs spread over highways
  • $ 459 million for public transportation
  • $ 403 million for hydraulic infrastructure
  • $ 293 million for airport improvements
  • $ 225 million to replace and repair bridges
  • $ 100 million for broadband infrastructure
  • $ 38 million for the expansion of electric vehicle charging stations
  • $ 12 million in cybersecurity infrastructure
  • $ 8.6 million for forest fire prevention

In addition, the governor’s office has estimated that the money will fund about 140,000 jobs.

The $ 2.5 billion allocated to the Nevada State Highway Fund will be spread over five years, according to the Nevada Department of Transportation. Over the next year, the state will receive an additional $ 83.5 million in transportation funding, an increase of about 21%. Funding will increase to $ 520.7 million by 2026.

The money will also help reduce the state’s $ 171 million backlog in bridge preservation work, officials said.

Transportation officials will prioritize the use of the money based on the One Nevada plan, they said. These priorities include “equitably meeting the long-term needs of all transport users such as cyclists, motorists, pedestrians and transit users” in a sustainable and safe manner.

“This funding is extremely important for the construction and maintenance of critical infrastructure that Nevada’s growing population needs,” said Kristina Swallow, director of the Nevada Department of Transportation. “While our long-term transportation funding constraints have yet to be resolved, we are delighted that this historic funding sets us on a better course to create a more connected, sustainable and equitable future for all Nevadans. “

Local officials shared their thoughts on how infrastructure funding could be spent, including Mayor Carolyn Goodman. She said she “would love to see some of this funding prioritize projects to move freight from the docks in California to the country.”

“The I-15 between Barstow and Stateline is a bottleneck that must be resolved,” the mayor noted in a tweet.



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‘Historic’ Infrastructure Bill Launches Electric School Bus Funding Stream https://preservethenati.org/historic-infrastructure-bill-launches-electric-school-bus-funding-stream/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/historic-infrastructure-bill-launches-electric-school-bus-funding-stream/ President Joe Biden signed the long-awaited bipartisan $ 1.2 trillion investment in infrastructure and jobs (IIJA) law that allocates $ 5 billion in new federal funding over five years for electric school buses and low-emission and includes a federal review of school bus stop safety technology. In an executive order implementing the new law, Biden […]]]>


President Joe Biden signed the long-awaited bipartisan $ 1.2 trillion investment in infrastructure and jobs (IIJA) law that allocates $ 5 billion in new federal funding over five years for electric school buses and low-emission and includes a federal review of school bus stop safety technology.

In an executive order implementing the new law, Biden said the IIJA is “a one-time investment in a generation” and will help rebuild America’s roads, bridges and railways. It will also expand access to clean water, ensure high-speed internet access across the country, tackle climate crises and tackle environmental justice.

After months of negotiations, the House passed the legislation on November 5, and Biden reportedly waited until November 15 to sign the bill so members of Congress involved in passing the legislation could attend a ceremony at the House. White.

Like School transport news previously reported, the IIJA is providing $ 2.5 billion for the purchase of new “zero-emission” or electric school buses and $ 2.5 billion for low-emission school buses made from CNG, propane and biofuels as part of a new clean school bus program administered by the US Environmental Protection Agency. . The funds will be allocated in increments of $ 1 billion ($ 500 million each for zero and low emissions) over the next five years.


Related: School bus infrastructure funds remain unchanged in House bill


The National School Transportation Association (NSTA) applauded the passage of the bill, which included the original “Stop for School Buses Act.” The bill calls for a comprehensive federal program to prevent illegal overtaking of school buses and requires the US Department of Transportation to review the laws, penalties and enforcement levels for illegal overtaking in all 50 states. The DOT will also review technologies such as video cameras, audible warning systems and improved lighting as well as driver education materials to make recommendations on best practices and most effective approaches.

The NSTA said on Monday that while school buses remain the safest form of transportation compared to all other modes, according to DOT statistics, an urgent issue is for motorists not to give in for stopped school buses. He added that the new program will provide an effective tool for states and local governments to try to prevent illegal overruns.

“Riding a yellow school bus remains the safest mode of transportation to and from school for students,” said NSTA President Carina Noble. “Unfortunately, illegal school bus crossings by motorists continue to plague the country, and DOT’s comprehensive program to tackle illegal overtaking contained in the IIJA will implement a nationwide campaign to educate the local population on this issue. of most concern in the common goal of making student travel even more frequent. safer.


Related: Vaccines for children ages 5 to 11 could be available early next month
Related: New York State Launches Awareness Program for Candidate School Bus Drivers
Related: UMA launches campaign for $ 6 billion in additional CERTS grants
Related: Watch: Homendy was sworn in as NSTB chairman
Related: COVID-19 funding assistance finally arrives for private school buses and coach industries


Meanwhile, the United Motorcoach Association (UMA) has said the infrastructure law represents a monumental victory for the private bus and coach company. The IIJA would have preserved the right of coach companies to operate without unfair competition from government-subsidized transit providers by leaving the charter service rule unchanged, the UMA said.

“The legislation is a landslide victory for all coach operators,” said new WBU President and CEO Scott Michael. “The act includes a five-year reauthorization of federal highway safety, transit, highway transportation and vehicle safety programs. The IIJA contains common sense safety and regulatory provisions, preserves the exemption from the motor coach fuel tax, and includes a new provision to strengthen the fairness of tolls with mass transit vehicles on facilities toll. More importantly, the bill spares costly and unnecessary mandates for an industry still in recovery mode from the effects of the pandemic. “


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Historic infrastructure bill presents unique opportunity and challenges for communities https://preservethenati.org/historic-infrastructure-bill-presents-unique-opportunity-and-challenges-for-communities/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/historic-infrastructure-bill-presents-unique-opportunity-and-challenges-for-communities/ With the passage of the $ 1.2 trillion infrastructure bill by Congress, cities and counties across the country are taking stock of the needs of their communities to best prioritize spending when funding arrives, I hope as soon as possible. The landmark initiative, which is slated to be signed by President Joe Biden next week, […]]]>


With the passage of the $ 1.2 trillion infrastructure bill by Congress, cities and counties across the country are taking stock of the needs of their communities to best prioritize spending when funding arrives, I hope as soon as possible.

The landmark initiative, which is slated to be signed by President Joe Biden next week, allocates more money for infrastructure than many communities have seen in nearly a century since the adoption of the New Deal during the great Depression.

“For cities and counties, I would do two things: look at long-term goals and strategies… (and) involve the community so they can understand what our long-term goals are,” said Elizabeth Kellar, Director public policies. for the International City / County Management Association (ICMA).

Specifically, the bill sets aside $ 284 billion for transportation, $ 55 billion for water, $ 65 billion for broadband, $ 73 billion for energy and electricity, $ 21 billion for $ for environmental sanitation, $ 8.3 billion for water infrastructure in the West (to cope with drought conditions) and $ 46 billion for resilience.

10 years from now, Kellar said she expects a retrospective public consensus on the infrastructure bill to reflect a sense of gratitude that “we started this effort when we did,” a she declared. “We look at our national highway system with almost reverence – we look at the Brooklyn Bridge with almost awe. “

The nation’s historic focus on infrastructure has weakened in recent decades. And in recent years, decisions about infrastructure spending have been made annually, with grant programs extended for one year in each legislative session. This anticipatory mentality at the federal level has made it difficult for local officials to conduct business prospectively and meet long-term infrastructure needs in their communities.

With increasingly dangerous storms caused by climate change and the evolution of green energy technologies, the need for smart spending initiatives to address America’s crumbling infrastructure, much of which has been built as a result of the New Deal, is crying out.

“The need for greater resilience is clearly a growing need due to climate change, and I think neglect is another part of that – this bridge that we built 100 years ago is starting to show signs that” it needs to be fixed – it’s a huge project, can we do it? ”Kellar said.

Meeting infrastructure needs of such magnitude takes time; and this is something the local administrators did not receive. So far, that is.

“You can imagine that if you’re trying to figure out if you have enough money to upgrade a bridge and you only have enough funding for up to a year, it’s hard to put the contract in place and (have confidence) that you will be able to complete the project, ”she continued.

From a local government perspective, one of the main strengths of the Biden administration’s infrastructure bill is that it replenishes key grant programs for at least five years, providing administrators with “planning opportunities.” long term ”for the first time in a long time.

But while this forward-thinking approach is needed, it will also pose challenges. On the one hand, officials will need to spend time educating the public on what it will take to tackle big projects. Reconstructing a bridge or updating a sewer system is not an overnight project, even if that is the delay voters expect.

“Anything that takes more than six months to accomplish, they get frustrated – we’re going to have a job in state and local government to talk about progress,” Kellar said. “It will be a long term effort.”

Additionally, small town governments may lack the in-house expertise to make spending decisions on new initiatives such as emerging green energy technologies, regional transport, or resilient infrastructure to tackle the shift. weather conditions. Kellar stressed that it will be important for local administrators to seek help either by consulting with experts or reaching out to adjacent communities and working together on projects.

In this, the bill encourages collaboration between counties by sending money to regional planning organizations, which “gets towns and villages to work together,” she said. It also takes representation into account and, through a few different mechanisms, brings in many different voices.

For communities unsure of what action to take, Kellar suggested reaching out to advocacy organizations, including the International City / County Management Association, the National League of Cities, the National Association of Counties, the Conference of United States mayors and government finance. Association of Officers, among others.

For the future, rules will have to be worked out on how the expenses will be allocated, and this will take time. In the meantime, Kellar has pointed out another bill currently in the House, having passed the Senate unanimously, which could help local administrators get projects started immediately, before they receive anything from the bill. on infrastructure.

The legislation, the “Law on the Flexibility of States, Local Tribes and Territories for Tax Adjustment, Infrastructure and Disaster Relief ”, would like “provide additional flexibility for the $ 350 billion Coronavirus State and Local Fiscal Recovery Fund (Recovery Fund) authorized under the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA), ”according to a brief from the National Association of Counties. If passed, it would allow “counties to allocate additional funds (stimulus funds) for the provision of government services, to invest in economic development and infrastructure activities, and to provide emergency relief.” in the event of natural disasters and their economic impacts “.

A stipulation in the bill limits this flexible spending capacity to $ 10 million, making it particularly beneficial for small communities.

“This will give these small jurisdictions… a clear direction, so they can put money in a bridge or make up for lost revenue, or make cyber investments,” Keller said. “With this flexibility bill, they could immediately (start). You already have the money in the bank because you have already received your first payment (ARPA).


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