Historic preservation – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ Mon, 08 Nov 2021 01:18:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://preservethenati.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/nati.png Historic preservation – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ 32 32 Portland City Council Considering Changes to Historic Preservation Plan https://preservethenati.org/portland-city-council-considering-changes-to-historic-preservation-plan/ https://preservethenati.org/portland-city-council-considering-changes-to-historic-preservation-plan/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 20:02:30 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/portland-city-council-considering-changes-to-historic-preservation-plan/ Some of Portland’s top neighborhoods enjoy the perks of being listed on the National Register of Historic Places: no demolitions, no McMansions or endless rows of square condos. It also often means that there is no new and affordable housing. All of that could change due to a proposal being considered by Portland City Council […]]]>

Some of Portland’s top neighborhoods enjoy the perks of being listed on the National Register of Historic Places: no demolitions, no McMansions or endless rows of square condos. It also often means that there is no new and affordable housing.

All of that could change due to a proposal being considered by Portland City Council starting this week, which is in part intended to address the major housing shortage in the area, especially when it comes to affordable housing.

As part of the updates proposed in the draft historical resources code, developers would be able to demolish structures in several other situations, including in individual residential areas in historic neighborhoods designated by the federal government on the National Register, but only if the demolition of the building could create more housing. affordable or for more people. (The full draft of the Historic Resources Draft Code is 262 pages long and also includes revisions to the city’s processes for selecting historic neighborhoods in the first place.)

It’s not just pretty old houses. A long pattern of policies both racially explicit and implicit have shaped Portland’s housing landscape from the start – racial alliances in the early 20th century effectively prohibited people of color from owning land, creating wealth or even reside in parts of Portland like Ladd’s Addition and the Southwest Hills.

In the second half of the 20th century, cheap housing like apartments and duplexes were banned on over 70% of the city’s residential lots, and, until the legislature passed an inclusive zoning law in 2016, there was a citywide ban on cities. requiring developers to create at least some affordable housing in their projects.

The HRCP and its potential changes are just the latest in a series of zoning changes designed to make the city more affordable for more people. Passed by city council in August 2020 and came into effect in August 2021, the somewhat controversial residential infill project has encouraged the construction of many more duplexes (and triplexes and quads) in parts of Portland where they don’t. were not allowed before. Despite these changes, some districts are still effectively exempt from infill: historic districts.

As with other older and nearby neighborhoods, many historic neighborhoods, including Ladd’s Addition, Laurelhurst and Irvington, have at least some exclusionary policies in their past. When neighborhoods like this are protected from change, they preserve that same exclusion, says Luke Norman, co-head of fair zoning for Portland housing reform group: Neighbors Welcome.

“The preservation of history is not inherently racist, but, intentionally or unintentionally, it has been used by some districts in a racist manner,” says Norman. “Our historical codes should honor our diverse history, not allow our whitest neighborhoods to remain exclusive.”

Right now, it takes a long and complex process involving the Portland Planning and Sustainability Commission and the Historic Landmarks Commission, as well as a city council vote, to demolish a “contributing building” in a historic district (that is, (i.e. any building deemed to add to the district’s historic designation), in a process called a demolition review.

Norman’s group wants to keep the demolition review for local historic neighborhoods, which are subject to city council control, but change it for national registry neighborhoods, which are created independently of local or state government. He recommends an amendment that would allow demolition in National Register Districts in as many cases as possible by state law. For National Register districts, which tend to be closer, well served by public transport and very walkable, such a change could make housing in these areas more accessible to middle-income families and first time buyers.

But housing advocates say many developments in a neighborhood can also inflate property values ​​and contribute to gentrification and displacement. This was a major fear during hearings for the residential infill project, with an eye on low-income neighborhoods like Lents and Montavilla. This could also be of concern in conservation districts with larger BIPOC populations like Mississippi Avenue. (The city defines conservation districts as “important geographic areas at the neighborhood level and regulated with more flexible historic resource protections than historic districts”, meaning they have less protections against demolition and redevelopment .)

Some council observers are skeptical of the real affordability of new developments in historic neighborhoods. Developers of affordable housing, who will not recoup the costs from high rents, often want to get their money’s worth, usually through grants, subsidies and tax breaks. They might therefore find that it makes more sense to develop in areas with low land value, and not in historic neighborhoods.

Another point of contention is the city’s democratic oversight of demolitions, particularly with the Historic Monuments Commission, a city-appointed group of seven who help oversee historic buildings and neighborhoods. Part of the draft historic resources code would expand exactly who can sit on the commission and approve new developments. At present, the rules are rather strict, requiring a local historian, an architectural historian and an architect, along with four other members with relevant expertise.

The HRCP would reject these rules and allow the mayor to appoint members to the Historic Monuments Commission with less direct expertise on historic preservation issues. The new language includes anyone with “professional experience and knowledge in one or more of the following categories: historic preservation, local history, architectural history, architecture, landscape architecture, real estate, economics, construction, community development, town planning, archeology, law, finance, cultural geography, cultural anthropology, management of cultural resources or related disciplines “as long as they have a“ demonstrated interest, skill or knowledge of historic preservation. ”(In the proposed rules , there could also be up to two individual members, and no more than two of the seven members “may be active in the purchase, sale, rental or development of real estate for profit.”)

Requiring only “demonstrated interest” raises concerns for John Liu, a lawyer and former member of the board of directors of the Laurelhurst Neighborhood Association. “You could have a historic monuments commission of seven people, two of which are full members and the rest are real estate brokers, lawyers, bankers and entrepreneurs,” he said of the changes. proposed. “There is actually no requirement that one person on the HLC be a recognized expert in architectural history. ”

Interest in potential changes is high. More than 100 people have registered to testify at a city council hearing midweek on November 3. A vote is expected later this year.


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Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation Seeks Nominations for Preservation Awards | New https://preservethenati.org/georgia-trust-for-historic-preservation-seeks-nominations-for-preservation-awards-new/ https://preservethenati.org/georgia-trust-for-historic-preservation-seeks-nominations-for-preservation-awards-new/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 20:21:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/georgia-trust-for-historic-preservation-seeks-nominations-for-preservation-awards-new/ ATLANTA – The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation is seeking nominations for its 2022 Preservation Awards, an annual list of preservation projects and people of the state who have made significant contributions to the field of historic preservation. The deadline for submission is November 19. Einners will be announced in April 2022. Prizes are awarded […]]]>

ATLANTA – The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation is seeking nominations for its 2022 Preservation Awards, an annual list of preservation projects and people of the state who have made significant contributions to the field of historic preservation. The deadline for submission is November 19. Einners will be announced in April 2022.

Prizes are awarded on the basis of the person’s or project’s contributions to the community and / or state and on compliance with the Home Secretary’s standards for handling historic properties.

♦ The Rehabilitation Excellence Awards recognize projects that make compatible use of a building through repairs, modifications or additions while preserving the characteristics of the property that convey its historical value.

♦ The Sustainable Rehabilitation Excellence Awards recognize rehabilitation projects that also incorporate appropriate conservation and sustainable treatments to reduce the environmental impact of a building while preserving the important features that reflect its historical significance.

♦ The awards for excellence in restoration recognize exemplary restoration of historic structures. A precise restoration project describes the form, features and character of a historic building as it appeared at a given time. The restoration requires a substantial upgrade of mechanical systems and other work required by code to make the site functional.

♦ The Preservation Excellence Awards recognize appropriate preservation of historic resources and creative interpretations of historic sites.

♦ The Stewardship Award recognizes those who have ensured the preservation of historic properties through long-term care and maintenance, stabilization, protection or continued family ownership.

♦ The Preservation Service Awards recognize individuals, groups, businesses and / or government entities that demonstrate exemplary activity and promote awareness in the field of historic preservation.

Visit www.GeorgiaTrust.org for a nomination form or call (404) 885-7814. Applications should be mailed or emailed no later than November 19. Nominees and winners will be notified several weeks before being recognized at an awards ceremony in April 2022.

Founded in 1973, the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation is one of the country’s leading non-profit preservation organizations. The Trust works to preserve and revitalize Georgia’s diverse historic resources and advocate for their appreciation, protection and use.

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Kendallville Presents Historic Preservation Commission Order | Sun News https://preservethenati.org/kendallville-presents-historic-preservation-commission-order-sun-news/ https://preservethenati.org/kendallville-presents-historic-preservation-commission-order-sun-news/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/kendallville-presents-historic-preservation-commission-order-sun-news/ KENDALLVILLE – For the first time, Kendallville is moving forward establishing ground rules to maintain and improve its historic downtown. After a nearly hour-long discussion at town hall ahead of Kendallville City Council on Tuesday, council members presented and approved on first reading and an ordinance that would establish a historic preservation commission for the […]]]>

KENDALLVILLE – For the first time, Kendallville is moving forward establishing ground rules to maintain and improve its historic downtown.

After a nearly hour-long discussion at town hall ahead of Kendallville City Council on Tuesday, council members presented and approved on first reading and an ordinance that would establish a historic preservation commission for the town.

This commission, if approved and formed, will then undertake the process of establishing a historic district covering the downtown area and developing guidelines on what building owners can do and should further aspire to do. when making physical changes to their buildings.

Kendallville City Council Chairman Jim Dazey was quick on his words after the ordinance was introduced, saying he believed the preservation effort could be of historic benefit to the historic street corridor main.

“I have been behind this office for 26 years. Every year I hear that we haven’t done anything for our downtown core, ”Dazey said. “This is the biggest and best opportunity we have ever had in this community. “

Kendallville must act now, as the creation of a historic preservation commission is a key requirement of the $ 2 million Main Street preservation grant the city received this fall. Although Kendallville introduced the concept on its own about a decade ago – an effort that was ultimately defeated by a coalition of business owners who opposed it – the city must act now or abandon it. grand prix of the state.

“The passage of this ordinance and the formation of the Preservation Commission are essential to receive this grant of $ 2 million,” said Mayor Suzanne Handshoe.

Even still, city officials had moved towards setting local standards anyway, especially with the recent millions poured into downtown investments in projects such as the downtown cityscape and downtown. numerous 50/50 matching grants from the Kendallville Redevelopment Commission.

At the town hall meeting prior to the council meeting, Todd Zeiger, director of the northern region office for Indiana Landmarks, summarized the purpose and function of historic preservation commissions in Indiana.

Three main points emerged: the commission is made up of local residents, who aim to protect the characters of the community; preserving, maintaining what exists or trying to reproduce it as closely as possible is the primary objective; and that setting rules and standards for the neighborhood holds each building owner accountable to each other and ultimately increases the level of investment in the neighborhood over the long term.

The seven-member board will be chosen by the mayor and must be approved by Kendallville City Council, with members serving a three-year term.

On Tuesday, Handshoe revealed that she had already received the hiring of four people to serve on the new board of directors – construction contractor, owner of a downtown building and former redevelopment commissioner Keith Ballard, owner of a downtown building and organizer of the Kendallville Car Show, Stéphane Langelier, Kendallville historian and KPC retiree. Publisher and President of Media Group, Terry Housholder, and Jerry Spaw, a member of Kendallville Restorations Inc. and passionate about neighborhood revitalization.

The mayor and council are in the process of locking down three other members who would be formally appointed to the commission if it were formed.

The commissions are made up of neighbors and landlords, who have a vested interest in seeing their communities thrive, Zeiger said.

“The commission is just a group of people who live in the community here and have experience in the design and construction of older historic buildings,” Zeiger said. “It’s you. It’s the Kendallville Historic Preservation Commission. It’s not me or anyone else.

Having a historic district and a preservation commission does not force any building owner to do any work. Routine repairs and maintenance can also be done without any additional commission intervention, so homeowners who just want to maintain their buildings should have no issues.

But when a building owner seeks to upgrade or make changes to the structure or character of their building, those projects go to the commission for review.

Handshoe said all such projects should go to the commission for review. In previous meetings, Handshoe has erroneously stated that this would only be required for work related to grants or local taxes, but it is not.

In an effort to allay common concerns about a hefty commission effectively telling building owners what they can and cannot do with their buildings, Zeiger said the process is almost always much more cooperative and collaborative, with the commissions. helping guide owners toward historically acceptable improvements.

“It is not the intention to turn it into a museum. The intention is to preserve the original building as much as possible, ”explained Zeiger. “The goal is to preserve the authentic nature of what you have.”

At an ideal level, Zeiger said there are three different levels. At the top, saving and restoring original features is still the best and most preferred options. In cases where something cannot be saved in its original form, it is best to repair it with new replica materials. Finally, in situations where the authentic functionality cannot be saved or replaced, the goal is to create something new that matches and fits with the historical theme.

The commission is there to represent the ideal case, but balancing that with the resources, scope and vision of the building owners to produce the best result.

“We don’t want the perfect to be the enemy of the good,” Zeiger said.

Finally, Zeiger said putting these rules in place uplifts the entire district and drives long-term investment and growth. When building owners know the ordinance protects them by ensuring that their neighbors do nothing to undermine the values ​​or aesthetics of the downtown core, they end up being more inclined to invest, which places the higher bar for all surrounding neighbors.

“If you look at these economic studies, it’s because this shared vision is there… I am protected that the neighbor is going to do the same and my investment is protected by that,” Zeiger said.

Although the new ordinance contains some teeth in terms of enforcement mechanisms, which may include fines or lawsuits to stop work, Zeiger said that over 25 years, there have been very few cases where it never got there.

Instead, even when there are disputes or disagreements, protracted negotiations between building owners, the commission, and outside resources ready to help almost always result in a good resolution.

“I can count on one hand, we’ve been on the app side with the commissions and these situations have been a blatant thumbs down,” Zeiger said. “There is no point in being out there, everyone loses in some ways.”

Another notable development on Tuesday was the eventual two-stage establishment of a historic district. The ordinance, as drafted, allows for a progressive historic district, with an initial three-year period during which commission approval would only be required for activities such as demolition or new construction.

Zeiger explained that this was an option but not a requirement, and said he would advise Kendallville to forgo this in favor of a full-power historic district from the start, which means that any building change should first go through the approval process.

When questioned by city council members, Zeiger again clarified that routine maintenance usually does not require commission approval. For example, replacing a flat roof with another flat roof or redoing a facade with the same materials already present, would obtain an automatic OK without the preservation commission having to intervene.

With much discussion on the matter on Tuesday, council members finally approved the first reading of Order 4-0, in the absence of council member Corey Boese.

The ordinance is expected to go to second reading at the next council meeting on November 16 at 7 p.m.

In other Tuesday business, the city council:

Heard from Fire Chief Jeremy McKinley, who said firefighters received excellent assistance from a Kendallville Police Department drone while fighting a fire at the Wash ‘N’ Dry coin-operated laundromat on the street Iddings last week. The drone enabled firefighters to better assess the ongoing fire and coordinate their efforts.

Heard from a man who said he was planning to buy the old Rudy’s Bar and Grill on North Main Street and needed information on what he could and couldn’t do there. inside the building. The man said he would also be interested in purchasing the old relaxation station next door and knocking through a wall to connect the two buildings. The mayor referred him to city building inspector Dave Lange for this information.

• The salaries of elected officials approved at second reading. Salaries for 2022 are as follows: mayor, $ 67,028.62; clerk-treasurer, $ 63,542.10; Members of Kendallville City Council and members of the Works and Public Safety Council, $ 5,500.


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Commission to focus on ‘implementation issues’ with recent amendments to Historic Preservation Ordinance – Pasadena Now https://preservethenati.org/commission-to-focus-on-implementation-issues-with-recent-amendments-to-historic-preservation-ordinance-pasadena-now/ https://preservethenati.org/commission-to-focus-on-implementation-issues-with-recent-amendments-to-historic-preservation-ordinance-pasadena-now/#respond Mon, 01 Nov 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/commission-to-focus-on-implementation-issues-with-recent-amendments-to-historic-preservation-ordinance-pasadena-now/ The Historic Preservation Commission is expected to discuss on Tuesday amendments to the revised Historic Preservation Ordinance (HPO) which came into effect earlier this year. Start of the meeting at 4.30 p.m. The revised ordinance, which came into effect in April, requires a Historic Resources Assessment (HRE) when a demolition or major project affecting a […]]]>

The Historic Preservation Commission is expected to discuss on Tuesday amendments to the revised Historic Preservation Ordinance (HPO) which came into effect earlier this year.

Start of the meeting at 4.30 p.m.

The revised ordinance, which came into effect in April, requires a Historic Resources Assessment (HRE) when a demolition or major project affecting a building 45 years of age or older is proposed.

Prior to the implementation of the HPO, eligible iconic neighborhoods were identified without a defined process, usually at the request of an owner.

As a result of the EDH process, the city is now required to assess whether a building qualifies for an individual historic designation or designation as a structure contributing to an eligible monument or historic district.

In their report, city staff listed the issues and concerns related to the implementation of the amended OPP.

“As a result of recent changes, the City is now imposing these bylaws on landowners who may not want them imposed on them,” the report says.

Staff also said that due to the likelihood of opposition from at least one landowner in a newly identified historic district, it is highly likely that most historic district eligibility decisions will be subject to review. ‘an appeal, which could lead to increased public animosity towards the city’s historic district. preservation efforts.

Staff also expressed concerns about EDH’s requirement for routine window replacement projects.

In their report, staff recommended adopting a series of clean-up amendments to bring the district’s historic process back to a “neighborhood-driven process”.

Specifically, staff recommend removing the eligibility assessment of a new monument or historic district from EDH’s requirement and limiting individual eligibility only, and specifying window replacement as a minor project, unless two or more changes to the original window design are proposed.

Since the HPO changes came into effect, municipal staff have processed 46 EDH requests, and 47 additional requests are currently pending.

Of the 46 completed EDHs, nine were required due to the proposed window replacement, 12 were required due to the proposed additions to the front facade, 14 were required due to the proposed major modifications to the front facades, one was required for a proposed addition on the second floor, and 10 were intended for possible demolition, according to the staff report.

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Loss of fire lookouts raises questions about historic preservation https://preservethenati.org/loss-of-fire-lookouts-raises-questions-about-historic-preservation/ https://preservethenati.org/loss-of-fire-lookouts-raises-questions-about-historic-preservation/#respond Mon, 25 Oct 2021 13:45:10 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/loss-of-fire-lookouts-raises-questions-about-historic-preservation/ Loss of fire lookouts raises questions about historic preservation For decades, fire observation towers have served as a bridge between the human eye and the surrounding landscape. From the heights of the mountains, hikers, observers and naturalists have been able to observe the breathtaking, if not inaccessible, sites to which watchtowers provide access – gaze […]]]>

Loss of fire lookouts raises questions about historic preservation

For decades, fire observation towers have served as a bridge between the human eye and the surrounding landscape. From the heights of the mountains, hikers, observers and naturalists have been able to observe the breathtaking, if not inaccessible, sites to which watchtowers provide access – gaze at glaciers and vast mountain ranges, feel new gusts wind and find comfort in the solitude offered by gazebos. However, as wildfires and lack of maintenance threaten fire watchers across the United States, these touchpoints are quickly disappearing, taking with them a rich history of the American environmental imagination.

Highpoint Observation Point, located on Mount Palomar. Credit: Creative Commons

Fire watchtowers have a long relationship with the land they were originally built to protect. The first American towers, managed by independent lookouts, predate the US Forest Service, created in 1905. At the time, there were already dozens of fire watches dotting the United States; during their heyday, the US Forest Service managed over 8,000 manned fire watch towers in 49 states. Now there is only 300 who are still actively occupied. Many offer unique views of breathtaking landscapes, such as Sahara Glacier in the desert of Glacier Peak.

Forest fire watch posts first served as crucial outposts for the men and women who watched forest fires, as they spent long hours and months staring at the horizon, looking at the horizon. looking for smoke or other signs that may indicate a dangerous fire. Work was and remains solitary work; the lookouts live in solitude in the tower, often without access to running water or electricity. At the beginning of the 20th century, wives of forest guards often served as fire watchers, as prejudices against women working in the forest land precluded them from assuming any other role in the Forest Service.

Black and white photo of a woman standing in front of a shed

Hallie M. Daggett, seen here in front of Eddy Gulsh’s observation post, was the first woman employed by the Forest Service and served as a fire watchman. Source: United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service

Forest fire watchers acquired an almost mythological presence in the American naturalistic tradition, in large part due to the many poets who featured fire watchers in their work in the mid-20th century. Gary Snyder, a decorated American writer and renowned poet whose work often focuses on environmental conservation themes, has spent time monitoring the fires Crater mountain in 1952. Shortly after his first stay, Snyder recruited fellow poet Philip Whalen to take up a post at a nearby fire watchman, and a few years later the two convinced Jack Kerouac to manage Desolation Peak, which features in the novels of Kerouac. Angels of Desolation and Dharma tramps. Whalen, Kerouac, and Snyder wove lookouts into the literary history of the American landscape, with Snyder writing in his poem “Mid-August at Sourdough Mountain Lookout” to contemplate “in the valley a haze of smoke / three days of heat, after five days of rain”.

Mountains and a blue sky seen from a peak

San Francisco Peaks as seen from the Kendrick Mountain Fire Observation Deck. Credit: Creative Commons

These ancient staples of American landscapes are now threatened with rapid extinction. Decades after their heyday, fire watchtowers occupy a precarious position between use and extinction. Their usefulness has largely faded, although some are still active and occupied by devoted lookouts which carry on the tradition of solitary observation. But new technological instruments, including satellites, cameras and drones, now monitor fires with far greater accuracy and speed than the human eye can reproduce. And although their romantic allure still captivates many, some fire-watching towers are now popular destinations for hikers to explore. to rent as unique vacation spots– they also serve as a physical reminder of America’s faulty relationship with fire management.

In September, one of Oregon’s most historic towers – the Bull of the Woods Lookout, located in the Mount Hood National Forest –burnt to the ground, despite plans to attempt to preserve the gazebo by protecting it with fire-resistant material. Last summer, Slater’s devastating fire made Bolan mountain lookout in southern Oregon, while the still active Scott Mountain Lookout burned down in the Archie Creek fire.

Before European colonization, fire was an integral part of the life cycle of a landscape. Indigenous peoples used prescribed burning as a crucial part of their relationship to the land. Fires that occurred without human action, such as those caused by lightning, were also allowed to burn without intervention. European settlers began a practice of fire suppression and banned Native burning practices. Forest fires have become rarer, but they have also increased in size, which has subsequently led to an increasingly intense fire-containment strategy. Fire watch posts have been erected and staffed as part of the new forest service fire management strategy: extinguish all fires as quickly and completely as possible.

Despite the efforts of the Forest Service, the fires continued to increase in size and frequency. It was not until the 1970s, when scientific research emerged confirming the benefits of forest fires for a forest’s ecology, that the Forest Service began to re-evaluate its approach to forest fire management. . Since then, the Service has attempted to change its approach. Recently, prescribed burning associations launched a collaborative effort with indigenous peoples to facilitate controlled burning and allow tribes to reclaim this practice.

Smoke on the mountainside with pines

A prescribed burn at the Mount Rushmore National Memorial in April 2020. Credit: National Park Service / Jim Johnson

So what to do with the hundreds of fire watchers, left unmanned, now standing without active use? Inspired by the emotional value they hold in American environmental memory, groups across the United States like the Forest fire monitoring association have emerged to advocate for fire monitoring as sites worthy of a place on the National Register of Historic Places. So far there are a total of twenty-two rounds on the list.

Listing in the National Register of Historic Places recognizes the cultural and historical importance of fire watch stations, but does not guarantee their preservation. In an interview with GlacierHub, Erica Avrami, professor of historic preservation at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University, explained, “Listing on the National Registry does not in itself protect a site from demolition or destruction. from neglect, long-term maintenance. Different levels and branches of government may designate a “historic” place in different ways, some of which offer more regulatory protection than others. But many of these processes involve community-initiated research and documentation, which in turn can mobilize interest and resources for their preservation. “

Marcy Rockman, who served with the US National Park Service as the first climate change adaptation coordinator for cultural resources, wrote that the criteria of the National Register authorize the nominations of places whose importance relates to contemporary problems, such as climate change. Running National Park Service Policy recommends recognizing the importance of places that can help contemporary society understand how climate change phenomena have arisen, which would include the extent and nature of forest fires. “For me,” said Rockman, “that’s an argument to preserve at least a few watchtowers. But how, how many and which, of course, would still need to be determined.”

Shaping the future of fire watch towers means considering not only what made them historic, but also what they represent in the history of firefighting in the United States. Although they served a generation of poets, fire watch towers have also hampered decades of effective fire management, allowing for the rapid increase in wildfires and destruction over the past twenty years. In 2020, 58,950 forest fires burned a total of 10.1 million acres of land – the second highest amount of land burned in a year in the United States since 1960. Unless fires are managed, fire observation towers like the Bull of the Woods lookout will continue to burn, making them one more feature to disappear amid the ongoing climate crisis. But hope for the towers remains; changing attitudes towards fire management means that fire watchers could continue to serve, as they have for decades, powerful reminders of the vast mountain landscapes and their ability to spark the human imagination in the world. future.



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Michael Duda Memorial Donation of $ 30 Million Establishes Historic Preservation Center at Notre-Dame School of Architecture | News | Notre-Dame news https://preservethenati.org/michael-duda-memorial-donation-of-30-million-establishes-historic-preservation-center-at-notre-dame-school-of-architecture-news-notre-dame-news/ https://preservethenati.org/michael-duda-memorial-donation-of-30-million-establishes-historic-preservation-center-at-notre-dame-school-of-architecture-news-notre-dame-news/#respond Fri, 22 Oct 2021 14:50:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/michael-duda-memorial-donation-of-30-million-establishes-historic-preservation-center-at-notre-dame-school-of-architecture-news-notre-dame-news/ Notre Dame Administrator Fritz Duda (center) received an honorary degree in 2009 from President Reverend John I. Jenkins, CSC (left) and then Chairman of the Board Richard Notebaert The administrator of the University of Notre-Dame Fritz Duda; his wife, Mary Lee; and the family foundation donated $ 30 million to the University’s School of Architecture […]]]>

Notre Dame Administrator Fritz Duda (center) received an honorary degree in 2009 from President Reverend John I. Jenkins, CSC (left) and then Chairman of the Board Richard Notebaert

The administrator of the University of Notre-Dame Fritz Duda; his wife, Mary Lee; and the family foundation donated $ 30 million to the University’s School of Architecture to establish a center dedicated to historic preservation in the area.

Named in memory of the couple’s son, the Michael Christopher Duda Center for Preservation, Resilience, and Sustainability will be housed at the School of Architecture but will serve as a hub for campus-wide work related to the centre’s goals. The donation will also allow the school to expand its cutting-edge program in urban planning and traditional architecture and town planning; support new professorships; sponsor national and international conferences on campus, in Texas and Chicago and at Notre Dame Global Gateways; and provide financial assistance to graduate students working in the field.

“Fritz and Mary Lee have been wonderful supporters of Notre Dame for decades, particularly with regard to our school of architecture and the university’s development projects in the neighboring community, and Fritz has provided valuable leadership to the on our Board of Directors, ”said Notre Dame President Rev John I. Jenkins, SCC, said. “We mourn with them the loss of Michael and celebrate his life with this extraordinary gift. They have our deep gratitude for their generosity and dear friendship.

Stefanos Polyzoides, Dean of Architecture Francis and Kathleen Rooney, added: The entire architecture program with the principles of sustainability and resilience that are key to Notre Dame’s mission to be a force for good in the world. I can’t think of a more fitting way to honor the legacy of Michael C. Duda, who focused his too brief career on preserving the heritage of places he loved.

Michael Duda’s steadfast interest in historic preservation grew out of his concern that there was a better way to live for everyone, a belief that grew stronger during his undergraduate years at the School. architecture of Notre-Dame. After graduating in 2005, he practiced architecture in California before returning to his native Texas and obtaining an MBA from Southern Methodist University. He joined his family’s real estate company, then in 2018 launched his own, the Briar Cove Development Co. He died at the age of 38 in 2019.

In recognition of his love of Texas architecture and history, Michael was appointed to the board of directors of the Texas Historical Foundation in 2011. Duncan Stroik, professor of architecture at Notre Dame, was named earlier this year administrator of the Texas Historical Foundation’s Michael C Duda Endowment, which supports efforts to preserve and celebrate the state’s buildings, bridges, monuments and other landscapes, and the people who created them.

“Michael Duda was very proud of his Texan heritage,” said his father, Fritz. “Inspired by his passion for historical learning and reading, he developed a keen interest in preserving and respecting the elements that make this country great. As a young board member of the Texas Historical Foundation, he drafted the initial charter for the foundation’s architectural endowment. His calm and determined leadership made the difference. The architectural endowment of the foundation now bears his name.

In an article titled “Another Size Class,” Foundation President Bruce Elsom wrote, “Michael knew who and where his passions lay. His commitment was indisputable, certain and impactful. He had a vision and was not afraid to take a risk; his efforts place him among the makers of difference. Faith, family and friends were at the heart of his life. He was also self-effacing, so it was left to others to brag about his many accomplishments. “

“Our family is happy to share our blessings now as we advance Michael’s legacy in Notre Dame’s transformation center for preservation, resilience and sustainability,” added Fritz Duda. “The mission of this center will pave the way for new watermarks and a greater call to Our Lady. It’s a future that resonates with life’s passions that have their roots in his educational experience at the college he loved.

Fritz Duda is the founder and president of Fritz Duda Co., a Dallas-based investment and development company. A graduate of Hastings College of the Law at the University of California, he served on the advisory board of the Notre Dame School of Architecture for seven years before being elected to the board in 1997.

During his time on the board, he chaired the Facilities and Campus Planning Committee and was instrumental in the Eddy Street commons redevelopment project to the immediate south of the campus. He also chaired the ad hoc international facilities committee responsible for the acquisition of the facilities for the Global Gateway from Rome to Notre Dame.

The Dudas have already made many generous donations in support of a wide range of Notre Dame initiatives, including the Fritz L. and Mary Lee Duda Family Scholarship, the 16-acre Irish Green on the side. south of the campus, endowed chairs and the Alliance for Catholic Education, of which he is a member of the advisory board. He received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from the University in 2009.

Mary Lee Duda is a graduate of the University of Iowa and has long been involved in religious, educational and community service programs and projects. Along with Fritz, she continues to be deeply involved and has provided advice and support to Notre Dame, including long-standing service to the University’s Irish Advisory Board. A chair endowed with literature is in his name.


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MTSU Historic Preservation Center awards $ 43,000 grant for WWII on Tennessee Home Front research https://preservethenati.org/mtsu-historic-preservation-center-awards-43000-grant-for-wwii-on-tennessee-home-front-research/ https://preservethenati.org/mtsu-historic-preservation-center-awards-43000-grant-for-wwii-on-tennessee-home-front-research/#respond Wed, 20 Oct 2021 10:00:09 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/mtsu-historic-preservation-center-awards-43000-grant-for-wwii-on-tennessee-home-front-research/ It’s no surprise that social studies is the favorite subject of Kira Duke, a staff member of the MTSUCenter for Historical Preservation. “I liked stories from the past, especially from the 1950s and 1960s, and I often read my textbook because I found the subject matter intriguing,” said Duke, education specialist for the Teaching with […]]]>

It’s no surprise that social studies is the favorite subject of Kira Duke, a staff member of the MTSUCenter for Historical Preservation.

“I liked stories from the past, especially from the 1950s and 1960s, and I often read my textbook because I found the subject matter intriguing,” said Duke, education specialist for the Teaching with Primary Sources program. of the Center. “(Growing up) I began to see history as vital to being able to understand the region I lived in and the issues our communities face today.

Duke and his colleagues at the center continually work on research projects to better understand this rich history, the most recent focusing on World War II and its impact on the Tennesseans. The project won a $ 43,000 grant from the Library of Congress which runs from October through next year.

“Our goal (using this grant) is to create a comprehensive, primary source-focused curriculum on the impact of WWII on the Tennessee Homefront that can be used in grade five undergraduate classes, from high school and the US History Survey, ”she said.

Duke’s passion for the past followed her from her hometown in Chestnut Mount, Tennessee, through her graduate degree in history at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville to her work at the center, which it started in 2010.

“My work, funded by the Library of Congress, educates K-12 teachers on best practices for using primary sources in the classroom, focusing on accessing sources in the Library of Canada’s digital collections. Congress, ”said Duke.

Educators and local administrators can access the wide range of professional development programs and educational materials offered by the centre’s program on its website https://mtsu.edu/tps.

The overall work of the center plays an important role in helping communities preserve and share their stories with a wider audience.

“Our communities have such a rich history and it’s important that we help tell those stories,” said Duke, explaining that the center depended on external financial support for much of its work.

“These (funds) provide opportunities to work on really interesting projects and provide our graduate assistants with incredible opportunities. Each of these projects is built on a partnership, which can then present future opportunities for the center.

Carroll Van West, director of the center, said staff are always looking for ways to develop resources that will help community educators better understand primary sources for key periods in state and government history. country.

“The recent creation of the Manhattan Project National Historic Site at Oak Ridge was another reason to further highlight Tennessee’s local and national histories during World War II,” West said.

Additionally, the center will use this research to collaborate with the National Park Service on a WWII waterfront book that will be sold in parks across the country.

Showing how MTSU works with public agencies and nonprofits is a key part of the centre’s mission, West said.

“These projects not only improve education and economic opportunities in Tennessee, they allow us to provide meaningful and practical work experiences to MTSU students who are heavily involved in all of these projects.”

To follow the work and educational opportunities of the Center for Historic Preservations, visit http://mtsuhistpres.org, the centre’s Facebook page, the centre’s Instagram, and the center’s Southern Rambles blog.



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MTSU’s Center for Historic Preservation wins $ 43,000 grant for WWII research on the Tennessee front https://preservethenati.org/mtsus-center-for-historic-preservation-wins-43000-grant-for-wwii-research-on-the-tennessee-front/ https://preservethenati.org/mtsus-center-for-historic-preservation-wins-43000-grant-for-wwii-research-on-the-tennessee-front/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/mtsus-center-for-historic-preservation-wins-43000-grant-for-wwii-research-on-the-tennessee-front/ Kira Duke, education specialist at the Center for Historic Preservation at Middle Tennessee State University, holds a photo from the Library of Congress’s digital collection of Tennessee Women working on a WWII “Vengeance” dive bomber , at the Heritage Center in Murfreesboro and in Rutherford County in Murfreesboro, Tenn. , October 13, 2021. The MTSU […]]]>

Kira Duke, education specialist at the Center for Historic Preservation at Middle Tennessee State University, holds a photo from the Library of Congress’s digital collection of Tennessee Women working on a WWII “Vengeance” dive bomber , at the Heritage Center in Murfreesboro and in Rutherford County in Murfreesboro, Tenn. , October 13, 2021. The MTSU center recently won a $ 43,000 grant from the Library of Congress for a research project focusing on the impact of WWII on Tennesseans. (MTSU photo by Andy Heidt)

It’s no surprise that social studies is the favorite subject of MTSUCenter for Historical Preservation staff member Kira Duke.

“I liked stories from the past, especially from the 1950s and 1960s, and I often read my textbook because I found the subject matter intriguing,” said Duke, education specialist for the Teaching with Primary Sources program. of the Center. “(Growing up) I began to see history as vital to being able to understand the region I lived in and the issues our communities face today.

Duke and his colleagues at the center continually work on research projects to better understand this rich history, the most recent focusing on World War II and its impact on the Tennesseans. The project won a $ 43,000 grant from the Library of Congress which runs from October through next year.

“Our goal (using this grant) is to create a comprehensive, primary source-focused curriculum on the impact of WWII on the Tennessee Homefront that can be used in grade five undergraduate classes, from high school and the US History Survey, ”she said.

Duke’s passion for the past followed her from her hometown in Chestnut Mount, Tennessee, through her graduate degree in history at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville to her work at the center, which it started in 2010.

“My work, funded by the Library of Congress, educates K-12 teachers on best practices for using primary sources in the classroom, focusing on accessing sources in the Library of Canada’s digital collections. Congress, ”said Duke.

Local educators and administrators can access the wide range of professional development programs and educational materials offered by the centre’s program on its website mtsu.edu/tps.

The overall work of the center plays an important role in helping communities preserve and share their stories with a wider audience.

“Our communities have such a rich history and it’s important that we help tell those stories,” said Duke, explaining that the center depended on external financial support for much of its work.

“These (funds) provide opportunities to work on really interesting projects and provide our graduate assistants with incredible opportunities. Each of these projects is built on a partnership, which can then present future opportunities for the center.

Carroll Van West, director of the center, said staff are always looking for ways to develop resources that will help community educators better understand primary sources for key periods in state and government history. country.

“The recent creation of the Manhattan Project National Historic Site at Oak Ridge was another reason to further highlight Tennessee’s local and national histories during World War II,” West said.

Additionally, the center will use this research to collaborate with the National Park Service on a WWII waterfront book that will be sold in parks across the country.

Showing how MTSU works with public agencies and nonprofits is a key part of the centre’s mission, West said.

“These projects not only improve education and economic opportunities in Tennessee, they allow us to provide meaningful and practical work experiences to MTSU students who are heavily involved in all of these projects.”

To follow the work and educational opportunities of the Center for Historic Preservations, visit mtsuhistpres.org, the centre’s Facebook page, the centre’s Instagram, and the southern Rambles centre’s blog.



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Atlanta Projects, Georgia Trust Historic Preservation Awards Volunteers https://preservethenati.org/atlanta-projects-georgia-trust-historic-preservation-awards-volunteers/ https://preservethenati.org/atlanta-projects-georgia-trust-historic-preservation-awards-volunteers/#respond Thu, 14 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/atlanta-projects-georgia-trust-historic-preservation-awards-volunteers/ By John Ruch Three Atlanta projects and two local volunteers are among the recipients of the Georgia Trust’s annual awards for Historic Preservation. Local projects honored at the 44th Annual Preservation Awards, held on October 11, included David T. Howard Middle School of Atlanta Public Schools, Neighborhood Church, and the Price Gilbert Memorial Library of […]]]>

By John Ruch

Three Atlanta projects and two local volunteers are among the recipients of the Georgia Trust’s annual awards for Historic Preservation.

Local projects honored at the 44th Annual Preservation Awards, held on October 11, included David T. Howard Middle School of Atlanta Public Schools, Neighborhood Church, and the Price Gilbert Memorial Library of Georgia. Tech.

The rehabilitation of Howard Middle School won the Georgia Trust’s highest honor, the Marguerite Williams Award, which is given to “the project that has had the greatest impact in preserving the state.”

The Candler Park Neighborhood Church received an award for its historic rehabilitation. (Photo by Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation)

Dating from 1923, the school at 551 John Wesley Dobbs Ave. in the Old Fourth Ward was built on land donated by its namesake David Tobias Howard, a former slave turned undertaker and one of Atlanta’s first black millionaires. The architect was A. Ten Eyck Brown, who also designed the Fulton County Courthouse and Sweet Auburn Curb Market. Participants over the years have included Martin Luther King Jr., former Mayor Maynard Jackson, Olympic high jump Mildred McDaniel and National Basketball Association Hall of Fame member Walt Frazier. The school closed in 1976 but reopened this year with rehabilitation and additions.

“Howard Middle School serves as proof that the preservation of important historical resources can still be achieved, allowing tangible connections to the past to inspire new generations,” the Georgia Trust said in a press release.

The school project earlier this year also received a design award from the Atlanta Urban Design Commission.

Neighborhood Church at 1561 McLendon Ave. in Candler Park won an “Excellence in Rehabilitation Award” for his work on structures dating from the 1920s and 1950s. “Overcoming the initial doubt that buildings could be saved and reused profitably, the neighborhood church rehabilitation illustrates how aging structures tucked away in old city neighborhoods are able to be turned into community assets with new life, ”the Georgia Confidence said.

Georgia Tech’s Price Gilbert Memorial Library won an award for sustainable rehabilitation. (Photo by Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation)

The Price Gilbert Memorial Library on the Georgia Tech campus won an “Award for Excellence in Sustainable Rehabilitation.” This is part of a library renovation that previously included the renovation of the Crosland Tower. Completed in 1953, Price Gilbert was designed by the late Paul Malcolm Heffernan, a Georgia Tech professor of architecture who then headed the program. The library was state-of-the-art in its day, the Georgia Trust said, but needed rehabilitation and better energy efficiency. “The final design ultimately transformed a well-designed but inefficient building into a technology-rich, people-centric space at the heart of the campus,” the organization said.

Atlanta residents James Newberry and Jesse Grainger shared the Camille W. Yow Volunteer of the Year Award. The two have been volunteers with the Georgia Trust for a decade and have worked on such projects during a video tour of Rhodes Hall, the organization’s iconic headquarters in Midtown, and on a new project highlighting its programs of historical preservation. Newberry is the Special Project Curator of the Department of Museums, Archives and Rare Books at Kennesaw State University. Grainger is a producer and editor in his own company, Jesse Loves Atlanta.

The award ceremony took place in Macon. For more statewide winners and other information, check out the Georgia Trust website.


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Residence in Lamar wins historic preservation award https://preservethenati.org/residence-in-lamar-wins-historic-preservation-award/ https://preservethenati.org/residence-in-lamar-wins-historic-preservation-award/#respond Thu, 30 Sep 2021 16:52:49 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/residence-in-lamar-wins-historic-preservation-award/ The Residence at Lamar, a recently completed seniors’ housing project in downtown Wichita Falls, is named one of the best affordable housing this year by the Affordable Housing Tax Credit Coalition (AHTCC). The property won the 27th Charles L. Edson Tax Credit Excellence Award in the Historic Preservation category. The award recognizes the best affordable […]]]>

The Residence at Lamar, a recently completed seniors’ housing project in downtown Wichita Falls, is named one of the best affordable housing this year by the Affordable Housing Tax Credit Coalition (AHTCC).

The property won the 27th Charles L. Edson Tax Credit Excellence Award in the Historic Preservation category.

In this file photo, a team uses three elevators to bring up a large sign on the corner of the former Maskat Shrine temple building that has been renovated into apartments for the elderly.

The award recognizes the best affordable housing developments and organizations that demonstrate effective use of low-income housing tax credits, the AHTCC said in a statement. These developments, the coalition said, have the capacity to strengthen communities, improve opportunities for residents and support local economies.

This year’s awards coincide with Congress’ consideration of a budget that includes a major investment in housing infrastructure. The AHTCC said communities across the county face economic and housing insecurity issues related to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

In this file photo, the renovation of the residence apartments in Lamar converted the old Maskat temple building into 30 downtown housing units.

“The affordable homes developed with housing credit prove that there is an effective solution to the housing crisis that continues to impact communities and families nationwide,” said the CEO of the ‘AHTCC, Emily Cadik. “This year, we are honoring properties serving veterans, opioid addicts and low-income seniors, in addition to outstanding efforts in preserving affordable housing and new construction built to meet the needs of Canadians. surrounding communities. These are just a few examples of what Crédit Logement does every day to provide essential affordable housing.

Main entrance and foyer of the Residence Apartments on Lamar in the historic building formerly known as the Temple of Maskat Shrine.

The Residence at Lamar was developed by Overland Property Group and is an example of adaptive reuse and renovation of a historic building.

Originally built in 1929, Lamar’s residence was once a furniture store and later housed various other businesses before it went vacant.

The ancient Maskat Shriner temple seen in an old postcard.  Built in 1929, the structure has been renovated into apartments for the elderly.

The property now has homes for 30 seniors who earn 30 to 60 percent of the area’s median income. There are 24 one bedroom houses and six two bedroom houses.

A nine percent home loan was used to finance the renovation and construction of the property, with syndication provided by Midwest Housing Equity Group.

Following:Unspoiled past at the Lamar building in downtown Wichita Falls

The beautiful renovation is a boon to the downtown area and provides safe and affordable housing for seniors in the area.


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