Historic preservation – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 21:08:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://preservethenati.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/nati.png Historic preservation – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ 32 32 Montana Main Street Program Historic Preservation Grant Presentation Held September 13 https://preservethenati.org/montana-main-street-program-historic-preservation-grant-presentation-held-september-13/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 16:41:03 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/montana-main-street-program-historic-preservation-grant-presentation-held-september-13/ Tash Wisemiller, community and economic vitality program manager for the Montana Department of Commerce, was in Sidney on September 13. Wisemiller toured the town and gave a presentation to community members, leaders and business people at the Meadowlark Public House in downtown Sidney. The Montana Main Street program was established in 2005 and currently serves […]]]>

Tash Wisemiller, community and economic vitality program manager for the Montana Department of Commerce, was in Sidney on September 13. Wisemiller toured the town and gave a presentation to community members, leaders and business people at the Meadowlark Public House in downtown Sidney.

The Montana Main Street program was established in 2005 and currently serves 35 Montana communities. This is a collaborative effort between the Community Development Division and the Montana Office of Tourism at the Montana Department of Commerce. The program provides services and assistance to communities wishing to increase their economic vitality while maintaining local historic integrity. The program provides technical assistance and expertise to member communities and provides competitive grants to communities actively working in downtown revitalization, economic development and historic preservation. They also help facilitate project tracking to gauge project success that can be compared to other projects in communities across the state. A few of the cities participating in the program with projects completed or underway include Roundup, Great Falls, Lewistown, Kalispell, Glasgow, Glendive, Baker and Ekalaka. For more information on the Montana Main Street program, go to https://comdev.mt.gov/Programs-and-Boards/Montana-Main-Street-Program.

The Montana Historic Preservation Grant Program is a state-funded program created in 2019 with the passage of Senate Bill 338, Sections 1 through 17. This program provides grant funds to public or private entities intending to preserve historical sites, historical societies or history museums. The program supports the preservation of Montana’s historic structures, sites, societies and museums, helping to maintain and demonstrating the economic impact of historic resources throughout the state. For more information on the Montana Historic Preservation Grant Program, go to https://comdev.mt.gov/Programs-and-Boards/Montana-Historic-Preservation-Grant.

In order to be eligible for Montana Main Street Program opportunities, Sidney must first participate in a competitive process to become a Montana Main Street Community Affiliate. The Sydney Chamber of Commerce initiated this process with the blessing of many businesses and local authorities. If and when Sidney is selected as an Affiliate Community, the Sidney Chamber intends to utilize the city’s revitalization and marketing opportunities. There will be a process of creating a strategic plan in which the Chamber expects to use as many companies as possible. Sidney Chamber Director Kali Godfrey said, The Montana Main Street program is our number one strategy for creating a community where businesses thrive, families settle and great memories are created. This environmental effort is what will bring people to Sidney and keep them.

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From the Opinion Panel: Housing Key to Historic Preservation of Boulder’s Evolution https://preservethenati.org/from-the-opinion-panel-housing-key-to-historic-preservation-of-boulders-evolution/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 16:40:25 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/from-the-opinion-panel-housing-key-to-historic-preservation-of-boulders-evolution/ This week, BBOP writes about two topics related to Boulder’s evolution over time. Do existing codes for historic preservation serve our community? How does our housing shortage tell us about suitable places to stay in the city? A historic home with a rear addition at Mapleton Hill in Boulder. (Photo courtesy of Eric Budd) Saturday, […]]]>

This week, BBOP writes about two topics related to Boulder’s evolution over time. Do existing codes for historic preservation serve our community? How does our housing shortage tell us about suitable places to stay in the city?

A historic home with a rear addition at Mapleton Hill in Boulder. (Photo courtesy of Eric Budd)

Saturday, September 17, 2022

Historical Preservation: Do existing code, procedures, and recent decisions meet the needs of today’s Boulder? Why or why not, and suggested changes, if any?

Andrea Steffes-Tuttle: What Historic Preservation Endangers

Recently, when reviewing Central Park’s landmark designation beyond the Glen Huntington bandshell, City Council voted 5-4 to follow staff’s recommendation and not extend the landmark designation. for the moment. Instead, they plan to do a broader review that recognizes the historic resources of the area and the evolution of the place over time.

Although disappointing for some, the vote was wise. This kind of restraint and more holistic thinking should be extended to future discussions of historic preservation. While I don’t know the detailed motivations or considerations of city staff, I assume they are working with the knowledge that our city is at a crossroads. Many of the important decisions we make now will impact Boulder’s affordability, accessibility and livability for years to come.

Historic preservation is a balancing act between recognizing our city’s culture and history while allowing room for growth and change. While recognition of our history (good and bad) is important, demands such as affordable housing and access to livable/walkable communities present larger and more complex issues for the city to address.

The Atrium, a building at 13th and Canyon, was newly assigned landmark status. What does this building bring to our community and the future of Boulder to distinguish this site as historic? In my opinion, granting the Atrium landmark status ensures that an ugly building with a questionable legacy of redlining will now forever stand in a desirable part of town. What’s the risk?

He’s risking every opportunity to rethink the use of a huge piece of land in central Boulder. What could be the future of this earth?

One idea that excites me is the prospect of having a year-round fixed market similar to those of Spain, Mexico, and other countries. With the dearth of local groceries in Boulder, the best place to access local food is the Farmers Market, but we can only do that halfway through the year. Wouldn’t it be amazing to have a year-round market where local vendors could set up shop and sell food and goods which could then expand to an outdoor area during the summer and summer months? fall ? (Editor’s note: This possibility was briefly discussed by city officials, including reusing the Atrium for such purposes, although no formal plan exists.)

This is a critical time to rethink Boulder’s spaces and places. If not done thoughtfully with our city’s current issues in mind, historic preservation will hamper our ability to evolve and make Boulder a livable and vibrant community for future generations.

What legacy do we want to leave? These artifacts, in the form of historic buildings, represent what this city and its people value. Does Boulder value progress, striving to build a community where future generations can live and prosper? Or do we value freezing old banks in amber?

Andrea is from Boulder and a new mom. Learn more about Andrea.

The East Boulder sub-community plan has recently sparked discussion about appropriate and inappropriate places to put housing. Low-income families across the United States have historically been located near highways, airports, railroads, industries, and other places that impact health. At the same time, a national housing shortage is driving mass homelessness. Your thoughts?

Mike Chiropolos: New Urbanism in the People’s Republic

Because current zoning and land use leaves little undeveloped land available for housing in Boulder Valley, new affordable housing primarily depends on infill, density, and redevelopment strategies.

Filling and density are gaining acceptance. ADU, skylight extensions, garage conversions and duplexes or triplexes on larger lots increase housing supply while making home ownership more widely affordable.

Building near nuisances endangering public health and children is unacceptable for HLMs, or any housing. This is why heavy industry is not allowed near residential areas. As for “minor” nuisances, I grew up one block from a railroad with a major railroad crossing. No one complained, ever.

Outside residential areas, innovative redevelopments offer great potential. The conversion of crumbling strip malls and empty big box stores to mixed use is one of the most exciting land use trends nationwide. In September 2021, I transmitted connections at town planners with the warning, “Let’s take a part of the action!”

It’s starting to happen. In May 2022, City Council approved the redevelopment of Diagonal square with 282 “workforce” and affordable housing on one of the city’s most derelict sites. Cheer! Neighbour Lafayette bought the 24 acres Property of Flatirons Church in 2017 to develop affordable housing.

Building heights of up to five or six stories can allow more land for pocket parks, bike paths and landscaping that contribute to livability and protection against urban heat island effects.

Harvest House is a great place for affordable student accommodation. Efforts to “save” the failing and crumbling hotel under historic preservation code are puzzling.

Other distressed malls or malls that may be suitable for mixed use include 29e Street mall; Basemar shopping center adjacent to CU; and 27e Way, where the developer ended the Baseline Zero hotel concept due to neighborhood issues.

Finally, the city must expedite a community planning process for the 500-acre planning reserve at Jay and 28e. The city owns 230 acres which I offered for a land exchange to allow CU to build a spacious North Campus instead of continuing with CU South into the South Boulder Creek floodplain, a valuable riparian area with great ecological and recreational potential under restoration scenarios.

The devastated reserve also includes 270 acres of private land, where the owner of an 80-acre piece of land sued the city in 2016 for permission to pursue a “vacation-style mixed-use neighborhood.” If the council is serious about solving Boulder’s housing crisis, advancing solutions to the reservation should be at the top of its agenda.

The 500 acre reserve is large enough to plan one of the most livable and equitable communities in Boulder Valley. We can improve environmental quality and access to open spaces while expanding amenities for all of North Boulder. Lit site plans can make a real dent in housing and affordability much sooner than under defects CU South annexation agreementwhere all development is 10 to 15 years.

(Editor’s note: City Council in 2019 managed staff to begin a baseline study for the possible development of the development reserve. In 2022, the current city council affirmed this orientation and had the reserve studied one of its priorities for 2022-2023. This work is ongoing.)

Mike Chiropolos raised two sons in Boulder where he lived a mile from the Table Mesa Mall. Learn more about Mike.

Boulder Beat Opinion Group members write in their own capacity. Their views do not necessarily reflect those of Boulder Beat.

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Cottonwood needs volunteers for the Historic Preservation Commission https://preservethenati.org/cottonwood-needs-volunteers-for-the-historic-preservation-commission/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 18:17:39 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/cottonwood-needs-volunteers-for-the-historic-preservation-commission/ Open the audio article player By Personal | on September 11, 2022 By the town of Cottonwood The CAST 11 podcast network is sponsored by the Prescott Valley Outdoor Summit. Where adventure comes together. The Town of Cottonwood is seeking candidates to serve on its Historic Preservation Commission for a three-year term. This volunteer position […]]]>

The CAST 11 podcast network is sponsored by the Prescott Valley Outdoor Summit. Where adventure comes together.

The Town of Cottonwood is seeking candidates to serve on its Historic Preservation Commission for a three-year term. This volunteer position is appointed by the City Council and serves without pay. The available seat may be filled either by a resident of the incorporated town of Cottonwood or by a non-resident with substantial ties to the town.

Town of Cottonwood, Cottonwood, volunteer, Historic Preservation Commission,

The Commission is made up of seven members, five of whom must be residents of the city. The two members who do not need to be residents of the city must have substantial ties within the corporate limits of the city, such as owning a building, owning a business, employment within the city limits or according to any other factor deemed relevant by the City. Advice. Professional experience in the fields of architecture, urban planning, history, archeology or construction is strongly desired, but not mandatory.

The Commission works in an advisory capacity on issues relating to historic preservation, strives to educate the public about the values ​​of historic preservation efforts, assists in the development of procedures to protect and enhance historic resources, and maintains a preservation plan. history for the town of Cottonwood. . The Commission also reviews development in historic districts, maintains the inventory of local historic properties, and helps designate historic landmarks for listing on the National Register of Historic Places.

Any resident interested in serving the community is encouraged to consider applying for this volunteer opportunity. Commission applications are available at the Office of Human Resources, located at 821 N. Main Street, by calling 928-340-2713, or online at www.cottonwoodaz.gov/368/Volunteer-Opportunities. Completed applications should be submitted to the Human Resources office no later than 3:00 p.m. on Friday, September 30, 2022.

For more information about the Commission, please contact the Community Development Department at 928-634-5505 ext. 3320.

Read more Cottonwood stories at Signals A Z.com.


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City officials juggle redevelopment and historic preservation at Butler Place https://preservethenati.org/city-officials-juggle-redevelopment-and-historic-preservation-at-butler-place/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 16:37:55 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/city-officials-juggle-redevelopment-and-historic-preservation-at-butler-place/ Much like the issues facing the Farrington Field and Billingsley Field House grounds on University and Lancaster, the redevelopment of Butler Place, the 42-acre former council housing site east of the city center, cannot be properly addressed. only if the sum total of the history of the property is preserved. These are not just dirt […]]]>

Much like the issues facing the Farrington Field and Billingsley Field House grounds on University and Lancaster, the redevelopment of Butler Place, the 42-acre former council housing site east of the city center, cannot be properly addressed. only if the sum total of the history of the property is preserved.

These are not just dirt dishes. The site is alive with generations of history that are significant to the history and culture of Fort Worth.

Sale of the property to a developer is contingent on Fort Worth Housing Solutions first obtaining approval from the US Department of Housing and Urban Development. Housing Solutions is seeking HUD’s consent through a “simplified voluntary conversion” under Section 22 of the United States Housing Act of 1937, according to an informal report presented to City Council on Tuesday.

Yet the redevelopment of Butler Place, bounded by Interstates 30 and 35W and US 287, has taken a step forward in recent days with recommendations from a committee to secure its past.

“The redevelopment of Butler Place will provide the city with an excellent opportunity for appropriate redevelopment of a variety of uses that will complement downtown Fort Worth,” said Fernando Costa, Deputy City Manager of Fort Worth, who noted the additional cost. redevelopment, the negative impact of historic resources on the site.

To that end, the Butler Advisory Board, established by Fort Worth Housing Solutions in 2019 to explore ways to preserve this history, presented their ideas for mitigating these negative impacts.

Among the recommended actions were applying to the city for historic landmark designation for three buildings, including the former Carver-Hamilton Elementary School building and two former residential buildings on Stephenson Street, which is already part of a National Register of Historic Places district.

The committee also recommended the construction of a 6.5-acre outdoor amphitheater on a hill adjacent to the IM Terrell campus; an African American Museum and Cultural Center in Fort Worth; a photo and video history of the Butler Place community; and the preservation of 1,000 bricks from the property for the making of public art installations.

The city’s Department of Neighborhood Services would be responsible for monitoring the implementation of the recommendations.

Opal Lee made an impromptu appearance at City Council’s business session on Tuesday to request that more bricks be saved to resurrect a building on the Guinn School campus at I-35W and Rosedale.

It’s a “win-win proposition,” Costa added, “preserving the best of our past, while creating development opportunities that will allow the city to continue remarkable growth.”

Butler Place was named in honor of Henry H. Butler, a Civil War veteran who escaped from servitude and among Fort Worth’s first African-American teachers. Butler Place was one of those projects built under Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal.

It opened in 1942.

Butler’s story – the man’s story – is interesting in itself.

We know a little about him from an interview he conducted as part of a “Federal Writers’ Project,” sponsored by the Library of Congress, between 1936 and 1938, which aimed to interview former slaves.

“My name is Henry H. Butler, and I’m over 87,” he said in an interview in July 1937. “The number may not be accurate, but you have to realize that there was no authentic slave birth record.. I estimate my age on the work I was doing at the start of the Civil War and the fact that I was old enough to be accepted as a soldier in the Union army in the year 1864.

He went on to say that he was born on George Sullivan’s plantation in Farquier County, Virginia. Sullivan also owned Butler’s mother and other children, but his father was owned by John Rector, “whose house was adjacent to ours”.

“In Sullivan Square there was a consideration for human feelings, but in Rector Square neither master nor overseer seemed to understand that slaves were human beings.

“On none of the plantations was there thought or compassion when a sale or an exchange was in question,” he added, referring to the separation of husband and wife, or mother and child, “and to the extreme grief of those involved”.

Butler said he escaped from Sullivan when the latter moved his slaves to Arkansas near Pine Bluff to avoid federal soldiers in 1863.

“I went to Federal Headquarters at Fort Smith, Arkansas, and was received into the military. We campaigned in Arkansas and neighboring territories. The major battle I fought in was at Pine Bluff, which lasted a day and part of a night.

After the war, he left the army and began his studies, starting at Pine Bluff Elementary School. He eventually entered Washburn College in Topeka, Kansas.

“After graduating I took steam engineering courses for four years, but later I went to Fort Worth and spent 22 years in educational work among my own people. I did my best to advance my race.

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$290,000 awarded to Maine historic preservation projects https://preservethenati.org/290000-awarded-to-maine-historic-preservation-projects/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 16:13:08 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/290000-awarded-to-maine-historic-preservation-projects/ PORTLAND & ELLSWORTH — The preservation of 22 historic buildings across the state will continue with more than $290,000 in grants from the Maine Community Foundation. The Belvedere Historic Preservation and Energy Efficiency Grant Program awarded the projects a total of $290,438. A donor with an Advised Fund at MaineCF provided an additional grant of […]]]>

PORTLAND & ELLSWORTH — The preservation of 22 historic buildings across the state will continue with more than $290,000 in grants from the Maine Community Foundation.

The Belvedere Historic Preservation and Energy Efficiency Grant Program awarded the projects a total of $290,438. A donor with an Advised Fund at MaineCF provided an additional grant of $2,500.

Projects include repairs to the Holden Town Meeting House and the First Congregational Church of East Machias, which was on Maine Preservation’s 2021 list of endangered buildings. Energy efficiency improvements will be made to the Foss Mansion in Auburn, seat of the Woman’s Literary Union of Androscoggin County.

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Demolition case reveals flaws in city’s historic preservation policies https://preservethenati.org/demolition-case-reveals-flaws-in-citys-historic-preservation-policies/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/demolition-case-reveals-flaws-in-citys-historic-preservation-policies/ Austin City Photo Thursday, September 8, 2022 by Kali Bramble A month-long debate over an East Austin bungalow ended in victory for the owner, with the city council voting to reject historic zoning last Thursday. The house, located at 1403 E. Cesar Chavez St., was first submitted to the Historic Landmarks Commission as a request […]]]>

Austin City Photo

Thursday, September 8, 2022 by Kali Bramble

A month-long debate over an East Austin bungalow ended in victory for the owner, with the city council voting to reject historic zoning last Thursday.

The house, located at 1403 E. Cesar Chavez St., was first submitted to the Historic Landmarks Commission as a request for demolition in January. Despite its decision that the site met the historic zoning threshold, the Planning Commission and Council ultimately sided with owner Bradley Harrison, who argued that rehabilitation would prove too financially burdensome.

“I realized the cost was just too high,” said Council member Pio Renteria, who had previously asked to defer the item for further consideration. “I’m prepared to go ahead and withdraw my objection on the understanding that (the owners) have put up a plaque or some sort of marker acknowledging the history of this site.”

Built in 1925, the Tofie and Bertha Balagia house served as the residence of the family behind Balagia Produce Company, a long-standing institution providing meat and produce both to the surrounding community and through contracts with the State of Texas. It is one of hundreds of sites flagged as architecturally and historically significant by the East Austin Historic Resources Survey. made in 2016.

While historic preservation staff judged the Craftsman-style bungalow to have a “high degree of architectural integrity”, engineering reports suggested otherwise, claiming that years of deterioration and termite infestation had rendered the irrecoverable house. Harrison, who bought the property to house venture capital firm Scout Ventures, reports that he was unable to insure the house in its current condition.

“I appreciated having the chance to go and see the Balagia house…and it’s just sad,” council member Leslie Pool said. “There is nothing that can be done about it at this stage…the insurance policy, I believe, expires today, and the owner has been unable to reinsure it despite trying very, very hard.”

After seeing years of similar demolition cases, the Council considered whether broader political solutions could help proactively resolve these disputes. Mayor Steve Adler noted that the Office of Historic Preservation, which is currently not equipped to conduct its own engineering reports, may require additional resourceswhile council member Kathie Tovo added that the city could invest more effectively in historic stewardship.

“I think one of the things we need to look at is providing our staff with the resources to deal with this kind of situation,” Adler said. “In a case where the owner has an engineering report, if our staff takes the position that it’s wrong, we have to figure out how to have the resources to make that case. I don’t know if I could vote for anything other than the reports we have, and that’s a big disadvantage for our staff trying to protect something historic.

“We recently invested funds in doing a historical survey…if we want to identify historical assets, we need to find ways to support those assets when they come here to the Council,” Tovo said. “I don’t know exactly what the solutions are, but low-cost loans, other kinds of more proactive programs to maintain those structures in our community, those are things I think we should be working toward.”

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Thelma Boltin Center Update Scheduled for Upcoming Historic Preservation Board Meeting https://preservethenati.org/thelma-boltin-center-update-scheduled-for-upcoming-historic-preservation-board-meeting/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 20:37:02 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/thelma-boltin-center-update-scheduled-for-upcoming-historic-preservation-board-meeting/ City of Gainesville press release GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Neighbors are invited to the city’s upcoming Historic Preservation Board meeting where staff from Wannemacher Jensen Architects, Inc. (WJA) will present design concepts and a vision for the city’s Thelma Boltin Center. Anyone interested in learning more about the challenges of reopening this cultural monument is encouraged […]]]>

City of Gainesville press release

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Neighbors are invited to the city’s upcoming Historic Preservation Board meeting where staff from Wannemacher Jensen Architects, Inc. (WJA) will present design concepts and a vision for the city’s Thelma Boltin Center. Anyone interested in learning more about the challenges of reopening this cultural monument is encouraged to attend.

When: 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, September 6.

Where: City Hall Auditorium, 200 E. University Ave.

The Historic Preservation Board will not vote on any proposals at the meeting, but expects to hear from stakeholders. Council members are area residents who are appointed by the Gainesville City Commission, in addition to a liaison officer.

Built in the Northeast Residential Historic District in 1943, the facility originally known as the Gainesville Servicemen’s Center was a place of entertainment for American servicemen stationed at nearby military bases. The city of Gainesville purchased the facility in 1946 and later renamed it after its first director, Thelma Boltin.

The City is committed to protecting the future of the community by investing in municipal facilities and infrastructure. The meeting will be broadcast live on the airwaves of the City website then archived online.

Recent timeline:

  • 2000 – The Thelma Boltin Center is renovated for the last time.
  • August 2019 – The Gainesville City Commission approves a complete renovation of the center.
  • March 2020 – Closure of the center due to the pandemic.
  • December 2020 – City staff discover that part of the roof above the center auditorium appears to have collapsed and hire a structural engineering firm to assess the damage and secure the roof.
  • Nov. 2021 – The firm finds structural damage to the center and recommends either the demolition and replacement of the auditorium or the demolition of the entire building.
  • April 2022 – The City of Gainesville Commission asks staff to work with the WJA and the Historic Preservation Board on a plan for the property.
  • Spring-Summer 2022 – City staff collect stakeholder feedback and provide updates at monthly Historic Preservation Board meetings on May 3, July 5 and August 8.


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First in a series of “Lunch & Learn” historic preservation events scheduled for September 7 https://preservethenati.org/first-in-a-series-of-lunch-learn-historic-preservation-events-scheduled-for-september-7/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 18:00:14 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/first-in-a-series-of-lunch-learn-historic-preservation-events-scheduled-for-september-7/ The Alexander County Historic Preservation Committee invites you to bring your lunch and learn more about historic preservation in North Carolina. Lunch & Learn events are scheduled every Wednesday at 12:00 p.m. during the month of September at the Alexander County Service Center Conference Room, located at 151 West Main Avenue in Taylorsville. The first […]]]>

The Alexander County Historic Preservation Committee invites you to bring your lunch and learn more about historic preservation in North Carolina. Lunch & Learn events are scheduled every Wednesday at 12:00 p.m. during the month of September at the Alexander County Service Center Conference Room, located at 151 West Main Avenue in Taylorsville. The first presentation of the series is scheduled for Wednesday, September 7. Presentations will be made by members of the State Historic Preservation Office, a division of the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources.

On September 7, Sarah Woodard David will review a brief history of the historic preservation legislation that underpins the National Register of Historic Places and an overview of the structure and branches of the North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. The main theme of the presentation, however, is the national registry itself. The webinar defines the two elements required for listing on the National Register, which are architectural integrity and historical significance. The presentation outlines the National Registry registration process in the State of North Carolina.

The public is invited to bring a lunch and enjoy this free presentation. If you would like to attend, please RSVP to ckincaid@alexandercountync.gov or call 828-352-7757.

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Sullivan’s Island City Council to Consider Historic Preservation Study – The Island Eye News https://preservethenati.org/sullivans-island-city-council-to-consider-historic-preservation-study-the-island-eye-news/ Tue, 23 Aug 2022 14:56:13 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/sullivans-island-city-council-to-consider-historic-preservation-study-the-island-eye-news/ By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye News Sullivan’s Island City Council has accepted a report from the Town’s Historic Preservation and Design Study Group and will discuss it in more detail at an upcoming council workshop. At its August 16 meeting, the Board decided that the report of the HPDSG, a subcommittee of the […]]]>

By Brian Sherman for The Island Eye News

Sullivan’s Island City Council has accepted a report from the Town’s Historic Preservation and Design Study Group and will discuss it in more detail at an upcoming council workshop. At its August 16 meeting, the Board decided that the report of the HPDSG, a subcommittee of the Board’s Land Use and Natural Resources Committee, will require further review before recommendations requiring changes to the The zoning ordinance is forwarded to the Planning Commission and that policy changes are implemented by the municipal administration, under the direction of the Council.

Chaired by John Winchester, the HPDSG completed its work after holding nine public meetings from March 3 to July 7. Among his recommendations is that of encouraging owners to restore free-standing historic structures rather than attaching them to new constructions. Council member Bachman Smith stressed that he was unsure what he and his colleagues were supposed to do with the report, which had already received the blessing of the LUNR committee and its chairman, Councilman Gary Visser. “I don’t know where we are going. I read it all, and I loved everything I read. But right now I’m much more confused than when we started. What are we voting on and what is the scope of the vote we take? Visser asked.

“What is the consequence of the vote we take? What are we doing here?” Visser replied that he hoped the Board would accept the report and act “at subsequent Board meetings.” Smith said he would rather tackle a few recommendations at a time, rather than to approve the whole package.” I’m not comfortable with something so comprehensive voting on it as a document as a whole,” Smith commented. “I think it might be a bit risky to review 16 recommendations and vote at the same time to send them somewhere.” A motion to accept the work of the subcommittee, “for informational purposes only”, and study the report at an upcoming workshop of the Board was passed unanimously.At their August 16 meeting, Board members also heard from Alissa Lietzow, Executive Director of Charleston Pro Bono Legal Services, who provided information on the upcoming Art on the Beach program. self-guided tour of Sulliv’s Island homes an has been held on the second Sunday in November for 23 years. In addition to the chance to view artwork – including some made by Sullivan’s Island residents – attendees will be able to sample food prepared by chefs throughout the tour.

The annual event raises funds for Charleston Pro Bono Legal Services, which provides legal aid to low-income community members. Council also heard from Avery McMurtry, who provided an update on his experience design and landscape architecture project at Battery Gadsden. “Migration”, which aims to boost the population of monarch butterflies, will continue until September 3. Also at the August 16 meeting, O’Neil reported on a letter the city received from Maj. Gen. James E. Livingston regarding a historic plaque that was unveiled at a recent ceremony. “I have participated in many patriotic events over the years, but none have moved me more than the wonderful tribute you organized for the marker honoring the heroism of Lt. Col. Jimmy Dyess in our own community,” indicates the letter. “The marker will be a permanent reminder to all who see it that indeed ‘freedom is not free’. Hopefully the tablet will inspire all who encounter it, young and old, to follow Lt. -Colonel Dyess and to become better citizens of our great country. In 1928, Eagle Scout and Clemson Cadet Dyess saved two women from drowning in the waters off Sullivan’s Island. Dyess, like Livingston, recipient of the Medal of Honor, was killed in action in the Marshall Islands during World War 2. The mayor and council also received a letter from Myra Jones and Lee Rowland, co-directors of the Charleston Beach Foundation, requesting that people who do not live on Sullivan’s Island have the same rights and privileges to park on state highways as Island residents.

“Our survey shows that there are at least 15 blocks or areas on state highways that have designated golf cart parking spots. While we agree that there are a few areas that are too small for other vehicles to park, the majority of areas are not. Additionally, some of the areas have landowner encroachments that are illegal and infringe upon state property and the rights of others to use the space to park a vehicle,” the letter states.

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State’s Office of Historic Preservation Seeks Nominations for Preservation Awards https://preservethenati.org/states-office-of-historic-preservation-seeks-nominations-for-preservation-awards/ Mon, 22 Aug 2022 18:04:48 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/states-office-of-historic-preservation-seeks-nominations-for-preservation-awards/ West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture, and History Photo Credit: wvculture.org Charleston, WV (WOAY) – The West Virginia State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) is inviting nominations for Our Legacy, Our Future Preservation Awards. The office will accept applications through September 15, and all individuals, organizations, resources, and historic districts are eligible. […]]]>



West Virginia Department of Arts, Culture, and History Photo Credit: wvculture.org

Charleston, WV (WOAY) – The West Virginia State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) is inviting nominations for Our Legacy, Our Future Preservation Awards. The office will accept applications through September 15, and all individuals, organizations, resources, and historic districts are eligible. The organization will host a reception at West Virginia Independence Hall in Wheeling on Sunday, October 9 at 2:00 p.m. to present the awards.

The awards program honors the exemplary work of dedicated individuals who advance the state by preserving and protecting historic resources. The organization will award five awards in three categories: the Betty Woods “Snookie” Nutting Award, the Individual Historic Resource Awards, and the Historic District Awards. Anyone interested in submitting a nomination will offer a one-page summary of the reasons for nominations and five supporting documents.

For more information about the Preservation Awards and to complete a nomination form, visit www.wvculture.org or contact SHPO Education and Planning Coordinator John Adamik at (304) 558-0240 or by e- mail to john.d.adamik@wv.gov.

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