Historic preservation – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ Wed, 18 May 2022 01:02:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://preservethenati.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/nati.png Historic preservation – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ 32 32 New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation Announces Availability of Historic Barn Rehabilitation Tax Credit Program | Local announcements https://preservethenati.org/new-york-state-office-of-parks-recreation-and-historic-preservation-announces-availability-of-historic-barn-rehabilitation-tax-credit-program-local-announcements/ Tue, 17 May 2022 15:39:03 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/new-york-state-office-of-parks-recreation-and-historic-preservation-announces-availability-of-historic-barn-rehabilitation-tax-credit-program-local-announcements/ ALBANY – The New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation has announced the launch of the revitalized Historic Barn Rehabilitation Tax Credit program. The new program allows state taxpayers who rehabilitate their historic barns to get a credit on state income tax owed. “New York’s rural landscapes are characterized by historic barns, […]]]>

ALBANY – The New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation has announced the launch of the revitalized Historic Barn Rehabilitation Tax Credit program. The new program allows state taxpayers who rehabilitate their historic barns to get a credit on state income tax owed.

“New York’s rural landscapes are characterized by historic barns, forming the identity of many communities,” said Erik Kulleseid, Commissioner of the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. “Conserving these historic structures, which are among the state’s most endangered historic resources, contributes to heritage tourism and expands opportunities for the state’s agricultural economy.” State Parks is pleased to add this program to its existing historic tax credit programs.

The amount of the tax credit is equal to 25% of the expenses incurred to rehabilitate a historic barn. To qualify, a barn must have been built before 1946 and the work must be approved by the Historic Preservation Division. Taxpayers can begin claiming the credit on their 2022 New York State taxes.

Governor Kathy Hochul signed legislation restoring and improving the Barn Tax Credit program, the availability of which was limited due to changes to the federal tax code in 2018. The legislation was sponsored by State Senator Michelle Hinchey of the 46th District and Assemblyman Didi Barrett of the 106th District.

“New York’s historic barns are emblematic of our agricultural heritage and a testament to the upstate’s economic leadership as America’s original breadbasket,” said Senator Michelle Hinchey. “Through our bill to revive the Historic Barn Rehabilitation Tax Credit Program, we are making it more affordable for New Yorkers to give these beloved buildings a new chance to live. Historic preservation is an important driver of rural revitalization, and I’m so proud to have sponsored legislation that will help save thousands of historic barns from disrepair, boosting local economies and local pride in the process.

“I was proud to sponsor legislation to resurrect the New York State Historic Barn Rehabilitation Tax Credit, and I am thrilled that the statewide application process is now open,” Assembly Member Didi Barrett said. “In the Hudson Valley – once the breadbasket of our fledgling nation – historic barns are an iconic testament to our region’s deep agricultural roots. This tax credit will inspire the next generation of farmers and small business owners to grow their businesses here in New York State, while preserving some of our most scenic and historic structures! »

“The Preservation League of NYS is grateful to Governor Hochul for signing into law the Historic Barn Rehabilitation Tax Credit, and to Senator Hinchey and Assemblyman Barrett for their leadership on this important issue of preservation,” said Preservation League President Jay DiLorenzo. “This credit is a much-needed resource for barn owners across the state who, through this program, will be able to make life-saving repairs and bring countless barns back to life, either by reinvigorating their agricultural function or reusing them. adaptively for new innovative purposes. .”

Applications may be mailed to 1 Delaware Avenue North, Cohoes, 12047 (for express mail service) or PO Box 189, Waterford, NY 12188 (for USPS mail service).

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PDN columnist Dave Lotz shares the importance of historic preservation | Opinion https://preservethenati.org/pdn-columnist-dave-lotz-shares-the-importance-of-historic-preservation-opinion/ Sun, 15 May 2022 03:30:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/pdn-columnist-dave-lotz-shares-the-importance-of-historic-preservation-opinion/ From Tuesday, May 24 through Thursday, May 26, at 8 a.m. at the Guam Museum, the Guam Preservation Trust’s second Pacific Preservation Summit is being held. The keynote address by Pale Eric Forbes, OFM Cap, is followed by many helpful historic preservation sessions on various topics at Hagåtña’s historic sites, including the Guam Public Library, […]]]>

From Tuesday, May 24 through Thursday, May 26, at 8 a.m. at the Guam Museum, the Guam Preservation Trust’s second Pacific Preservation Summit is being held. The keynote address by Pale Eric Forbes, OFM Cap, is followed by many helpful historic preservation sessions on various topics at Hagåtña’s historic sites, including the Guam Public Library, Guam Congress Building, and Lujan House as well than the Guam Museum. .

On the program for the following days, an excursion to the Latte Valley, along the Talo’fo’fo River, and to the Paseo de Susanna in Hagåtña for traditional sailors.

The Pacific Preservation Summit is an opportunity to learn and join efforts to preserve the indigenous cultures of the Pacific, sponsored by our island’s leading heritage preservation entity, the Guam Preservation Trust. For more information, visit www.pacificpreservation.org/2022. Prior registration is required.

With over thirty years of extensive historic preservation achievements, the Guam Preservation Trust has an outstanding record that includes restoring historic homes in Inalåhan and Hagåtña, restoring the Guam Congress Building, and supporting numerous publications, including the recent Latte in the Marianas by Kelly Marsh Taitano and Jolie Liston.

The Guam Preservation Trust also produced educational programs like Ekungok I Estoria-ta (Listen to Our Stories of the Historic Sites Education Series), offered technical training opportunities in the archaeological field, which included cultural resource management programs , including Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, Traditional Cultural Properties, and the Essential Involvement of the Youth of Guam and the Surrounding Islands in Heritage Preservation.

Guam Preservation Trust is primarily funded by building permit fees charged for clearance and construction permits that alter the environment of our island. The link is that funds received from changes in our environment will help preserve what is important to our island’s heritage. For a wealth of information on the Guam Preservation Trust, visit guamppreservationtrust.org.

The future of the Guam Preservation Trust is continued public involvement in the Trust’s next strategic plan to 2027, the master plan for Atantano in Piti of a natural environment rich in ancient resources of CHamoru, the restoration of the FQ Sanchez School in Humåtak, restoration of the historic Guam Courthouse in Humåtak (the post-war courthouse along Route 4), preservation of CHamoru archaeological sites in various locations on the island and in October , a public forum for archaeology.

The Trust is governed by a Board of Trustees made up of professionals in the fields of architecture, archaeology, Chamoru culture, history and planning with staff headed by Joe Quinata, the Director of the program.

I am fortunate to hold the primary position on the Board of Trustees for planning and my opinions expressed here are my own and do not necessarily reflect those of the Board of Trustees or Guam Preservation Trust.

Dave Lotz is a strong advocate for protecting Guam’s unique heritage; a savvy, lifelong hiking enthusiast and conservationist; and criticism of incompetent governments. He has resided in Guam since 1970 and retired from the Guam Department of Parks and Recreation, Andersen AFB Environmental Flight, and the National Park Service.

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Clermont to Receive Historic Preservation Commission Award | Winchester Star https://preservethenati.org/clermont-to-receive-historic-preservation-commission-award-winchester-star/ Sat, 14 May 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/clermont-to-receive-historic-preservation-commission-award-winchester-star/ BERRYVILLE — The Clermont Foundation will receive an award for its restoration of a structure in which enslaved laborers lived for four decades before emancipation. The restoration of the “Slave Quarter”, as the building is officially known, was intended to ensure its survival as an educational facility well into the future. The historic 360-acre farm […]]]>

BERRYVILLE — The Clermont Foundation will receive an award for its restoration of a structure in which enslaved laborers lived for four decades before emancipation.

The restoration of the “Slave Quarter”, as the building is officially known, was intended to ensure its survival as an educational facility well into the future. The historic 360-acre farm structure in Clermont, east of Berryville, was in danger of collapsing.

The Clarke County Historic Preservation Commission (HPC) will next week present a Certificate of Merit to the foundation, along with four people involved in other restoration projects. The certificates, awarded annually, honor those who have successfully renovated historic structures and other places deemed essential to preserving the county’s cultural identity.

Clermont was established on property originally owned by Lord Fairfax and surveyed in 1750 by George Washington, who was 18 at the time. The farm has had several owners over the years. The family of Clarke County attorney and judge Elizabeth Rust Williams owned the farm for 185 years. Upon his death in 2004, Williams bequeathed it to the Virginia Department of Historic Resources (DHR).

The private foundation, created by Williams, manages the farm in partnership with DHR. No state funds are allocated to the operations of the farm, which is now a center for research and training in agriculture, history and historic preservation.

Built in 1823 by Dawson McCormick, the slave quarters are the only remaining of three such buildings in Clermont. Historic curators say it is one of the few surviving log duplex slave quarters.

“We had a little row (of buildings) here,” said the foundation’s executive director, Bob Stieg. Archaeologists discovered the foundation of yet another on one side of the remaining structure and artifacts of yet another on the other side, he said.

A $236,000 grant from the National Park Service was secured for the rehabilitation of the remaining structure, which was completed in 2015.

HistoriCorps, a nonprofit that repairs historic buildings and promotes preservation work, oversaw the project. Forty-five volunteers from across the country participated.

The duplex’s stone foundation, log walls and roof structure have undergone repairs. A new coating was installed to protect the logs from the sun and humidity. Much of the original upholstery was lost in bad weather, especially Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

In addition, a new roof covering made of recycled black cypress shingles was installed.

The building’s attic, accessed by a wooden ladder, is now used to show people how a historic building can be preserved, Stieg said. The floorboards were “pressed” to fit their tongues into the grooves, he said. And, the original post rafter logs – still covered in bark – are visible.

“These poor old things have been doing their job (helping support the roof) for over 100 years,” Stieg said, noting how strong the rafters remain.

Anyone entering the attic should be careful: the square nails used in the original roof construction protrude all over the place.

The attic is believed to have once been used to store hay and other farm supplies, Stieg said.

Originally, the building had two large rooms where bonded laborers lived. The rooms were divided into four in 1861.

Some of the logs in the original walls below are visible. The same goes for some of the thin wooden panels on the logs, as well as plaster wall panels, installed around the turn of the 20th century as times began to modernize.

However, the building is largely composed of planked floors and walls. A porch, a small kitchen and a bathroom with plumbing were added over time. Mold stains cover the kitchen and bathroom ceiling, which is no longer usable – small boards cover the toilet sink.

Inside the kitchen are simple wooden cabinets. Other relics that now occupy the building include a salt smokehouse, an old plow and an antique school desk, the writing surface of which is raised to enter the storage compartment for pencils and paper.

History revealed that 10 enslaved people under the age of 12 occupied the structure before emancipation, Stieg said. These children, along with the women, took care of household chores while the men worked in the nearby fields, he said.

In the years following emancipation, the building housed unmarried male farm workers. It was last occupied in the late 1950s and early 1960s by a family who rented it from the Williams family, according to Stieg.

Given its simple construction that has stood for several centuries, “it really is an amazing building,” he said.

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Noem Proclaims May as Archeology and Historic Preservation Month | Community https://preservethenati.org/noem-proclaims-may-as-archeology-and-historic-preservation-month-community/ Fri, 13 May 2022 02:54:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/noem-proclaims-may-as-archeology-and-historic-preservation-month-community/ PIERRE – Governor Kristi Noem has proclaimed May Archeology and Historic Preservation Month in South Dakota. The month “introduces the public to the disciplines of archeology and historic preservation and strengthens the enduring bond between past and present,” Governor Noem said in the proclamation. Historic Preservation Month has been celebrated in South Dakota since its […]]]>

PIERRE – Governor Kristi Noem has proclaimed May Archeology and Historic Preservation Month in South Dakota.

The month “introduces the public to the disciplines of archeology and historic preservation and strengthens the enduring bond between past and present,” Governor Noem said in the proclamation.

Historic Preservation Month has been celebrated in South Dakota since its nationwide inception in 1973. The state added archeology in 2005 to recognize it as a partner in historic preservation.

“South Dakota’s cultural heritage is rich and diverse, represented by thousands of archaeological and historical sites, historic buildings and landscapes that have been identified and recorded throughout the state,” said Ted M. Spencer, of the South Dakota State Historic Preservation. “Public appreciation and understanding is the foundation of preserving South Dakota’s past for future generations.”

The 2022 theme for the month is “Looking Local – History Where You Are”. The South Dakota Office of Historic Preservation wants to encourage South Dakotans to research and learn more about their area’s history.

The State Historical Society would like to know your favorite historic site in South Dakota, which will be shared on the society’s Historic Preservation Facebook page. Email shpo@state.sd.us or tag your own Facebook post using @southdakotashpo.

Once again, the State Historical Society sponsored a statewide essay contest for all fourth graders, the year South Dakota history is often taught. The goal was to allow students to better appreciate their historical resources, the stories they tell and why they should be cared for.

Students were asked to write a 100-400 word essay based on the prompt “This Place Matters”. They were asked to write about any place in South Dakota that is at least 50 years old, why it is a favorite place for them, and why it should be saved. It didn’t have to be an existing historic site. Entries were judged on quality of writing, content and theme, and originality of thought.

There were 118 entries, from 12 different cities and 11 different schools across the state.

The first place winner was Jack Hern of Rapid Valley Elementary in Rapid City. Jack’s essay was titled “The Spokane Mine and the Ghost Town” and was about the Spokane Gold Mine near Custer State Park. He won a cash prize of $100 and a one-year family membership in the South Dakota State Historical Society worth $55.

Liv Knopp, also of Rapid Valley Elementary in Rapid City, took second place. Its title was “The Learning Library” and was written about the Rapid City Public Library. She won a $75 cash prize and a one-year family membership in the State Historical Society.

Faith Roehrich of Clark County Elementary in Clark won third place with a story called “A mistake that matters to me” about Bowdle’s water tower. She won a $50 cash prize and a one-year family membership in the State Historical Society.

For more information about this annual celebration or other historic preservation programs, contact the State Historic Preservation Office at the Cultural Heritage Center, 900 Governors Drive, Stone, SD 57501-2217; phone 605-773-3458, email shpo@state.sd.us or website history.sd.gov/preservation. For more information on membership in the State Historical Society, visit history.sd.gov/membership or call 605-773-6000.

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WY Governor to Mark May as Historic Preservation Month / Public News Service https://preservethenati.org/wy-governor-to-mark-may-as-historic-preservation-month-public-news-service/ Mon, 09 May 2022 03:02:38 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/wy-governor-to-mark-may-as-historic-preservation-month-public-news-service/ On Thursday, Wyoming Gov. Mark Gordon is expected to sign a proclamation declaring May 2022 Historic Preservation Month, part of a national observance dating back to 1973. Carrie Edinger, historical program manager for the Sheridan Community Land Trust, said Wyoming is full of buildings and sites where historical events can be remembered. She encouraged residents […]]]>

On Thursday, Wyoming Gov. Mark Gordon is expected to sign a proclamation declaring May 2022 Historic Preservation Month, part of a national observance dating back to 1973.

Carrie Edinger, historical program manager for the Sheridan Community Land Trust, said Wyoming is full of buildings and sites where historical events can be remembered. She encouraged residents of all ages to get out and explore their local and regional history.

“If we talk about it and share our memories and those stories, or what elements need help to be preserved,” Edinger said, “it not only helps to save it and preserve it, but also to keep it alive. .”

Each May, historic societies, preservation groups, and business and civic organizations across the United States celebrate Historic Preservation Month through events that promote historic places and heritage tourism, and demonstrate the economic and social benefits of preservation.

This May marks the fourth annual celebration hosted by the Alliance for Historic Wyoming. A full list of events is available at historicwyoming.org.

Edinger’s group has planned a bus tour of the black diamond trail Tuesday, exploring the region’s history of mining millions of tons of coal from seams up to 40 feet thick for trains and power plants.

Edinger also encouraged people to sign up for a hands-on preservation experience scheduled for Saturday at the historic Monarch Lutheran Cemetery just off Interstate 90 north of Sheridan.

“Everything from eating weeds to cleaning or maintaining gravestones,” Edinger said. “And we’re also going to do documentation on the cemetery. We’re going to create a map of the cemetery layout.”

Volunteers will check the names on the headstones against a list created by the Wyoming Hall of the Sheridan County Library.

For anyone interested in learning more about historical preservation, Edinger suggested contacting nearby museums and historical groups. She said preservation groups such as the Trust are always on the lookout for curious volunteers.

“Volunteers help out at events, they sometimes help with research, and they’re also presenters on the Explore History program,” Edinger said. “So there are many ways to volunteer, depending on skill level and interest, there is always something to do.”

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Historic Preservation Month: Specters of Benton County After Part II https://preservethenati.org/historic-preservation-month-specters-of-benton-county-after-part-ii/ Sat, 07 May 2022 11:04:25 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/historic-preservation-month-specters-of-benton-county-after-part-ii/ The theme for Historic Preservation Month 2022 in Benton County is “This Place Matters More Than Ever”. Specters of Benton County’s Past, Part II This year the Benton County Historic Resources Commission team up again with enigma house bring the past to life through a mystery adventure game,”Specters of Benton County’s Past, Part II.” Enjoy […]]]>

The theme for Historic Preservation Month 2022 in Benton County is “This Place Matters More Than Ever”.

Specters of Benton County’s Past, Part II

This year the Benton County Historic Resources Commission team up again with enigma house bring the past to life through a mystery adventure game,”Specters of Benton County’s Past, Part II.”

Enjoy the first part of spectra of Benton County Past, which was created through the fantastic imagination and technological wizardry of Adrienne Fritze and Mark van der Pol of Conundrum House, a local Corvallis business dedicated to the art of having fun through Games. spectra is historically factual with a touch of fiction. Replay the first season of spectra – or discover it for the first time! – during the month of April to Specters.ConundrumHouse.com. The second season of spectra begins on May 7 and a new episode will be released on the 14th and 21st, with a climactic grand finale at the Corvallis Museum on the 28th.

This game is free and open to all ages. The game is a family event, and because it can be played entirely online, you can share this fun and exciting event with your family and friends from other communities and states. Register for the game here.

Grand finale

The Grand Final of the game will take place at the Corvallis Museum (411 SW 2nd St Corvallis, OR, 97333) at 5:30 p.m.

For more information on Historic Preservation Month, visit Benton County webpageand our blog post.

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Carbondale to Receive Grant for Historic Preservation Projects https://preservethenati.org/carbondale-to-receive-grant-for-historic-preservation-projects/ Fri, 06 May 2022 16:08:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/carbondale-to-receive-grant-for-historic-preservation-projects/ CARBONDALE, Ill. (KFVS) – A southern Illinois community is one of five to receive grants for historic preservation projects. The town of Carbondale received $21,000 in federal historic preservation funds, with the town providing $9,000 in matching funds. They will use the money for a historical study of residential neighborhoods in the northeast quadrant of […]]]>

CARBONDALE, Ill. (KFVS) – A southern Illinois community is one of five to receive grants for historic preservation projects.

The town of Carbondale received $21,000 in federal historic preservation funds, with the town providing $9,000 in matching funds.

They will use the money for a historical study of residential neighborhoods in the northeast quadrant of the city limits to be incorporated into the city’s preservation plan. The previous historical survey had not been updated since 2002.

On Friday, May 6, the Illinois Department of Natural Resources announced the approval of federal funding of $117,250 for the five projects through the National Park Services Historic Preservation Fund.

According to an IDNR release, the program is open to 84 certified local governments in Illinois with money available to reimburse participating CLG communities for projects focused on investigation, public education, planning and nominations to the National Register of Historic Places.

Other projects include:

  • Village of Frankfurt – The project is an intensive historical study of the city center. The village received $24,500 in federal historic preservation funds, with the village providing $10,500 in matching funds
  • Kendall County – The project is an intensive historical study of Kendall and Bristol townships. Kendall County received $29,750 in federal historic preservation funds, with the county providing $12,750 in matching funds
  • City of Collinsville – The project is to create historic preservation design guidelines for the city’s historic landmarks and potential preservation district to establish a clear set of professionally developed guidelines. The town of Collinsville received $7,000 in federal historic preservation funds, with the town providing $3,220 in matching funds
  • McHenry County – The project is an intensive rural historical survey of Burgon, Coral, Dorr, Greenwood and Richmond townships, last updated in 2002. McHenry County received $35,000 in federal funds historic preservation, with the county providing $15,000 in matching funds

According to the IDNR, the State Historic Preservation Office is planning another round of CLG Grants in the fall of 2022.

Copyright 2022 KFVS. All rights reserved.

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Historical preservation and renovation workshops for old houses May 21 | Advertisement https://preservethenati.org/historical-preservation-and-renovation-workshops-for-old-houses-may-21-advertisement/ Fri, 06 May 2022 15:30:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/historical-preservation-and-renovation-workshops-for-old-houses-may-21-advertisement/ SANBORNTON – The Sanbornton Historic District Commission will host a day of seminars on Saturday, May 21 at Meeting House Hill Road Town Hall beginning at 9:30 a.m. These workshops will be led by experts from the Historic New England organization. The morning program begins from 9:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. and features an overview […]]]>

SANBORNTON – The Sanbornton Historic District Commission will host a day of seminars on Saturday, May 21 at Meeting House Hill Road Town Hall beginning at 9:30 a.m. These workshops will be led by experts from the Historic New England organization.

The morning program begins from 9:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. and features an overview of historic New England’s preservation philosophy and the Secretary of the Interior’s standards for the treatment of historic properties, including preservation, rehabilitation, restoration and reconstruction. Alongside this review of preservation principles, this session will look at typical architectural styles of buildings in and around Sanbornton and provide a framework for identifying the character-defining elements of their properties.

After a lunch break from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m., the afternoon program will start at 1 p.m. and end at 3:30 p.m. In this afternoon session, participants will learn to apply the information from the morning program learned, as they undertake the routine. maintenance and consider larger projects on their properties. Participants will learn how to perform an annual assessment of their home’s conditions and tackle smaller maintenance projects to avoid larger, more expensive and invasive repairs. This session will also provide information on what to consider when making changes or planning larger projects and best practices for increasing energy efficiency in older or historic homes without compromising the character of the building.

This event is made possible in part by a grant from the National Park Service, Department of the Interior, through the New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources. As such, they are all open to the public in addition to residents of historic Sanbornton. The historic district was created by city vote in 1984.

Save the date for a Sanbornton Historic District Virtual Walking Program with Historic Preservation Consultant Mae Williams on June 23 at 7 p.m. at the Sanbornton Historical Society’s Tavern Lane. This is another program funded by the NH Division of Historic Preservation.

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Town Celebrates Historic Preservation Month – The Waynedale News https://preservethenati.org/town-celebrates-historic-preservation-month-the-waynedale-news/ Fri, 06 May 2022 04:01:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/town-celebrates-historic-preservation-month-the-waynedale-news/ The City of Fort Wayne celebrates National Historic Preservation Month by showcasing the city’s historic neighborhoods, buildings and landscapes throughout the month of May. To promote and commemorate the month, the city’s Community Development Division will be sharing facts and photos about unique historic neighborhoods across the city via social media posts on the Fort […]]]>

The City of Fort Wayne celebrates National Historic Preservation Month by showcasing the city’s historic neighborhoods, buildings and landscapes throughout the month of May.

To promote and commemorate the month, the city’s Community Development Division will be sharing facts and photos about unique historic neighborhoods across the city via social media posts on the Fort Wayne Neighborhoods Facebook page and on Twitter, @ FW Neighborhoods. The division is also encouraging residents to join in the celebration by sharing photos that depict Fort Wayne’s rich history on social media with the hashtag #PreserveFW22.

Historic Preservation Month partners include ARCH, Inc. and Visit Fort Wayne. ARCH will host Karen Richards on May 21 at 11 a.m. at the History Center for a “fun and free” talk. The subject will be “Urban Farms”. Richards will explore the history and architecture of homes that housed farming families or were country estates before neighborhoods grew and the city developed around them. Many of these homes are Fort Wayne single-site local historic neighborhoods.

Historic Preservation staff have produced a number of walking tour brochures of historic areas of the city, including brochures for The Landing and for historic buildings in the downtown area. These brochures are available from Visit Fort Wayne, the Community Development Office, and can be downloaded from the city’s historic preservation website: www.fwcommunitydevelopment.org

“Historic preservation is good business for Fort Wayne and the surrounding area,” said Creager Smith, Historic Preservation Planner for the City of Fort Wayne. “Electric Works has put Fort Wayne in the national spotlight for major preservation projects. The National Trust Community Investment Corporation, a subsidiary of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, made the largest historic tax credit investment in the company’s history; a total of $48.2 million for Electric Works.

For more information on electrical work: www.ntcic.com

The city’s Historic Preservation staff and the Historic Preservation Commission strive to strengthen the city’s historic resources through heritage preservation and development. The Historic Preservation Program offers a range of assistance to help landowners and neighborhoods recognize historic properties by listing them as local historic districts or on the National Register of Historic Places. Technical assistance is also available to help owners maintain or restore the historic character of their properties.

The Waynedale Press Team
Latest posts from the Waynedale News team (see everything)

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Building on 25 Productive Years: Historic Preservation Remains Vibrant at Waverly | Waverly Logs https://preservethenati.org/building-on-25-productive-years-historic-preservation-remains-vibrant-at-waverly-waverly-logs/ Thu, 05 May 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/building-on-25-productive-years-historic-preservation-remains-vibrant-at-waverly-waverly-logs/ May is National Preservation Month, the perfect time to celebrate the purpose and activities of the Waverly Historic Preservation Commission (WHPC). The Commission recently celebrated its silver anniversary in December 2021, marking 25 years of service to the Waverly community. Their mission, as stated on the WHPC website, “is to recognize, preserve, promote and safeguard […]]]>

May is National Preservation Month, the perfect time to celebrate the purpose and activities of the Waverly Historic Preservation Commission (WHPC). The Commission recently celebrated its silver anniversary in December 2021, marking 25 years of service to the Waverly community. Their mission, as stated on the WHPC website, “is to recognize, preserve, promote and safeguard sites and neighborhoods of historical and cultural significance in order to educate citizens and visitors and foster pride in the city. of Waverly, Iowa”.

On March 26, 1996, resident Patty Tucker spoke to Mayor Les Zelle and the city council about the desire to create a local Historic Preservation Commission with the goal of identifying, evaluating, and protecting historic properties in Waverly. It was noted that historic preservation of this type could boost community pride as well as economic growth.

Waverly City Council unanimously passed Ordinance 685, creating the Historic Preservation Commission to provide for the “recognition and promotion of historic sites”. On May 6, 1996, five members were immediately appointed to the commission: Kate Payne, Inez Christensen, Don Huston, Barbara Hess and John Meyer. Anna Shultz and Sally Vogel joined the Commission soon after, bringing the number of commissioners appointed to seven.

The Iowa State Office of Historic Preservation officially designated the WHPC as a Certified Local Government (CLG) program on December 4, 1996, allowing the commission and the city to use historic preservation as a tool for economic development and making them eligible for national and state grants and other financial aid opportunities.

First steps towards national recognition:

According to the stated goals of the new Commission, one of the main tasks was to compile an inventory of “historic properties in the city that…deserve further study for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places.” Under the banner of the National Park Service, this register includes the nation’s historic places worthy of preservation. Prior to the existence of the Commission, the Bremer County Historical Society Museum was the first site accepted to be placed on this register (1976), followed by the Old Main at Wartburg College (1978). The Commission has since contributed to the nomination of other properties, including the Bremer County Courthouse (2003), the Waverly Municipal Hydroelectric Generating Station (2013), and the Third Street SE “Green” Bridge (2018).

Additionally, three neighborhoods and downtown Waverly have been designated Historic Districts with the assistance of the Commission: Old Fourth Ward SE (2013), East Bremer Avenue Commercial (2014), Harmon & LeValley NW (2014), and Sturdevant SW (2016). Plans are currently underway to determine if the NE district near downtown is also eligible for nomination as an additional historic district.

Additionally, local rewards have been introduced. The Commission launched the Historic Preservation Award program (renamed the Waverly Historic Preservation Award) in 2003, which will be awarded to residential and commercial owners who “demonstrate an effort to preserve original architectural integrity in recent exterior improvements”. The first recipients of this award were Brian and Mariah Birgen, and Jim and Candy Hundley. Since then, 21 additional residential properties have received this award, plus one commercial property. The Commission continues to seek nominations for this award and others each year.

In 2007, the Commission inaugurated the Waverly Historic Registry (renamed the Waverly Historic Registry) to “recognize properties or sites in the community that are of historic or architectural significance”, but which may or may not qualify for federal registry. historical places. Again, Wartburg’s “Old Main”, Bremer County Historical Society Museum and Bremer County Courthouse were the first to be placed on the local register. Since then well-known sites have been added including the Waverly Rail Trail Bridge, Ira Sturdevant House, Kuethe House, Farmers Exchange, St. Paul and First Baptist Churches, the original Waverly High School (now Crosspoint Church ) and Rock Island. Depot (now 4 Queens).

Finally, in 2008, an additional award honoring Waverly’s departed monuments was under development. An honorific has been completed: the Dairy Spot of Iowa plaque, placed on a rock in Kollmann Park near the Cedar River Bridge. That year’s flood then filed new rewards plans for nearly 15 years, but the subject is finally under consideration again to honor sites such as the original Waverly Hospital, Racecourse, the long gone hotels and churches and the opera house.

Winners are listed on the Commission’s website (http://www.waverlyia.com/whpc), with links to nomination forms, photographs and additional information. Signs have been purchased to mark all historic neighborhoods and the street corners within them.

Current honors and initiatives:

In 2018, the WHPC was one of three national winners at a conference organized by the National Alliance for Preservation Commissions. The Excellence Award recognized Waverly’s outstanding achievements in developing historic neighborhoods after the 2008 flood. The Summer 2019 issue of Alliance Review, a national preservation journal, published “Seizing the Positive: How Waverly, Iowa, turn Disaster into Opportunity”.

At the request of City Council, WHPC is currently collaborating with the Community Foundation of NE Iowa in a fundraising campaign to honor the SE 3rd Street “Green” Bridge with signs, a plaque and public art. . These efforts include the dedication of “The Visionary Sightseeing Binoculars” art installation on May 14, 2022. Visit https://www.cfneia.org/giving/find-a-fund/696-ac for more information.

The Commission continues to promote awareness and foster pride in Waverly’s past accomplishments by providing recommendations to City Council, maintaining an informative website, hosting public forums with educational content, creating tour brochures at foot for historic districts, sponsoring activities in May Preservation Month, providing a birds-eye-view poster map of 1868 Waverly (available to the public for a donation), and commemorating landmarks with bronze plaques and panels related to history.

The current commissioners are Karen Lehmann, President; Kris Brunkhorst, Vice President; Glenn Fenneman, Don Meyer, Mary Meyer, Darius Robinson and Justin Jeffcoat Schedtler. They are nominated by the mayor, with the approval of the city council, and anyone interested in being a part of them can visit the application page on the City of Waverly website for more information. Original commissioner Kate Payne, who still resides in Waverly, noted that she applied for the newly formed WHPC in 1996 while looking for a way to engage more civically. Payne said, “I can’t think of a better way to help Waverly build awareness and recognize the many historic resources available in this community than to support historic preservation efforts.”

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