Preservation committee – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ Tue, 10 May 2022 17:11:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://preservethenati.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/nati.png Preservation committee – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ 32 32 Preservation Committee Announces Grant Opportunity for Homeowners https://preservethenati.org/preservation-committee-announces-grant-opportunity-for-homeowners/ Mon, 09 May 2022 10:02:34 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/preservation-committee-announces-grant-opportunity-for-homeowners/ SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (WWLP) – The Springfield Community Preservation Committee announces the 2022 Historic Homes Restoration Program and homeowner grant opportunity. Price hike expected for summer holidays 2022, with a peak at the end of June The program is open to owner-occupied homes in local historic neighborhoods to be eligible. Homes must be built before 1940 […]]]>

SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (WWLP) – The Springfield Community Preservation Committee announces the 2022 Historic Homes Restoration Program and homeowner grant opportunity.

The program is open to owner-occupied homes in local historic neighborhoods to be eligible. Homes must be built before 1940 and owned and occupied by the applicant for one year prior to application. The maximum grant is $30,000 per household.

According to a press release from the Springfield Community Preservation Committee, this year a sliding income scale will be used for eligibility, if there are a large number of applicants and there are not enough. funding, a lottery will be organized for applications.

“Well, you know Springfield is known as the city of homes. And the city has designated a variety of neighborhoods as local historic districts, which imposes a different kind of maintenance requirement. It’s really vital to keep those historic areas in good condition,” said Robert McCarroll of the Springfield Community Preservation Committee.

The program is for outdoor projects only, such as restoring windows, doors and porches.

The deadline to apply is June 30.

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Public Participation Opens Comment Process for Historic Preservation Committee | News https://preservethenati.org/public-participation-opens-comment-process-for-historic-preservation-committee-news/ Mon, 09 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/public-participation-opens-comment-process-for-historic-preservation-committee-news/ The Oregon Department of Parks and Recreation (OPRD) is accepting public comment on proposed changes to the comment process at meetings of the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation (SACHP), which reviews nominations to the Registry National Historic Places. The deadline for comments is May 31 at 5 p.m. The OPRD is proposing updates to […]]]>

The Oregon Department of Parks and Recreation (OPRD) is accepting public comment on proposed changes to the comment process at meetings of the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation (SACHP), which reviews nominations to the Registry National Historic Places. The deadline for comments is May 31 at 5 p.m.

The OPRD is proposing updates to Oregon’s administrative rules that govern how individuals submit comments at public SACHP meetings. Under the proposed rule, comments would be submitted to OPRD staff who would share them with committee members during the meeting. Any comments not relevant to the application will not be shared.

The proposed rule is similar to a temporary rule put in place in November 2021 after a virtual committee meeting was disrupted when an attendee began typing racial and homophobic slurs directed at committee members. Without action, the rules language would revert to its previous form. For the wording of the temporary rule to become permanent, the agency must open the proposed amendment to public comment and follow the rule adoption process.

“Under the proposed rule, the committee will continue to hear all comments relevant to the listing criteria,” said Ian Johnson, Deputy Assistant State Historic Preservation Officer. “The aim is not to censor comments, but to prevent hate speech from interrupting a meeting.”

Comments can also be submitted through the following channels:

• In writing: Oregon Department of Parks and Recreation, Attention. Katie Gauthier, 725 Summer St NE, Suite C, Salem OR 97301

After considering public comments, OPRD staff plans to submit a recommended final rule for consideration by the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission.

The SACHP is a group of nine Governor-appointed members with an interest or expertise in history, archaeology, architecture, and other disciplines. Members review all proposed appointments to the National Register in Oregon. Information is available at https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/OH/Pages/Commissions.aspx.

The National Register of Historic Places is the official United States listing of buildings, districts, structures, sites, and objects significant to local, state, or national history. The program is managed by the National Park Service and administered locally by the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office. More information at https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/OH/Pages/National-Register.aspx.

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West Side Rag » CB7 Preservation Committee votes to deny West Park’s request to remove the landmark from the church https://preservethenati.org/west-side-rag-cb7-preservation-committee-votes-to-deny-west-parks-request-to-remove-the-landmark-from-the-church/ Sat, 07 May 2022 02:31:08 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/west-side-rag-cb7-preservation-committee-votes-to-deny-west-parks-request-to-remove-the-landmark-from-the-church/ Posted May 6, 2022 7:07 AM by West Side Rag By Carol Tannenhauser Community Board 7’s Preservation Committee voted Thursday night to reject West Park Presbyterian Church’s request to remove the historic designation of the 12-year-old church: Eight members voted to reject the request; only one member supported it, while another abstained. The committee’s recommendation […]]]>

Posted May 6, 2022 7:07 AM by West Side Rag

By Carol Tannenhauser

Community Board 7’s Preservation Committee voted Thursday night to reject West Park Presbyterian Church’s request to remove the historic designation of the 12-year-old church: Eight members voted to reject the request; only one member supported it, while another abstained.

The committee’s recommendation is then presented to the full community council on June 7 and then to the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission, which is expected to decide the fate of the church this summer.

The church has requested the removal of the historic designation, which would free it to sell the property to a developer who plans to demolish the building and replace it with a 19-story condominium.

What the intersection of Amsterdam and 86th Street might look like. Rendered via alchemy properties.

About 200 people joined the Zoom meeting at 6:30 p.m. Thursday night, which lasted more than four hours. They first heard the presentation of the church and its team of experts, detailing the disastrous state of the building and the expected costs to restore it, followed by comments and questions from the committee and the community.

The presentation of the church is here.

During the hours of discussion, with comments from more than 40 participants, only a few supported the church’s request. Many who spoke described the church as irresponsible or negligent in the management of the building.

“It hasn’t been a historic landmark for very long and I really struggle to understand how it could have been so badly run in such a short time,” said Avery Ryan, who lives next to the church, calling the difficulties she claimed “self-inflicted”.

Ryan was one of several speakers to blast the local rectory – the church’s governing body – and the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) itself, “for allowing a landlord to mismanage [the church] out of its landmark status. It could not have happened, she said, “without complete abdication and complacency.”

Several speakers suggested that if the building was eventually torn down and replaced with a condominium, none of the proceeds should go to the Presbytery. “I really hate that there’s financial gain and historic status thrown away so quickly,” Ryan concluded.

“Rewarding a homeowner who participates in a negligent demolition will set a precedent,” said Sean Khorsandi, executive director of the conservative non-profit group Landmark West.

“I just feel extremely sad and discouraged about the current situation,” said Melissa Elstein of the West 80s Neighborhood Association, capturing the sentiments of many witnesses. “It’s such a tragedy. I just hope we can preserve it.

Photograph via West Park Presbyterian Church.

City Council member Gale Brewer, who was in attendance, insisted preservation is possible, saying one of the obstacles to raising the millions of dollars needed to restore the building is that people don’t want to. give to a church. “It should belong to a non-profit organization,” she said. “That’s what the presbytery should be doing, because once a nonprofit owns it, I can allocate the city’s money. I cannot allocate money to a church.

Brewer said she thinks Upper West Side foundations and residents would “easily allocate money to a culturally-focused nonprofit. If the Presbytery sold it to a nonprofit, we would end up with millions of dollars to renovate it,” she insisted. “The idea that someone is going to tear this down and replace it with condos is beyond reprehensible, and I will do everything I can to preserve this building.”

Thursday’s vote and resolution was the first step in a process to decide the fate of the building.

After hearing the church’s presentation and public comments, CB7 Preservation Co-Chair Michelle Parker said, “Plaintiff has failed to meet the extremely heavy burden of proof required.”

“Tonight’s discussion revealed options and opportunities that have not been explored and would be forever ruled out if demolition were permitted,” added CB7 member Mark Diller.

Several committee members called it the toughest decision of their careers, but in the end, members of the CB7 Preservation Committee voted overwhelmingly to deny West Park Presbyterian Church the “exemption.” for difficulties” they claimed. The committee’s resolution, which will be drafted after the meeting, will include the words: “CB7 requests the Landmarks Preservation Commission to disapprove the application, as presented.”

The full board will consider the resolution at its next meeting on June 7. Its recommendation will then go to the Monuments Commission, which will hear more public comment before taking a final vote.

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Springfield Community Preservation Committee undergoing CPA process https://preservethenati.org/springfield-community-preservation-committee-undergoing-cpa-process/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 19:18:54 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/springfield-community-preservation-committee-undergoing-cpa-process/ SPRINGFIELD – The Community Preservation Committee (CPC) is reviewing 25 applicants for Community Preservation Act (CPA) funding. The CPC approves funding for the CPA on an annual basis, with the creation of the act assisting projects that help preserve the character of the community. This year, the Committee received 25 requests totaling $4,678,952. The amount […]]]>

SPRINGFIELD – The Community Preservation Committee (CPC) is reviewing 25 applicants for Community Preservation Act (CPA) funding.

The CPC approves funding for the CPA on an annual basis, with the creation of the act assisting projects that help preserve the character of the community. This year, the Committee received 25 requests totaling $4,678,952. The amount awarded is commensurate with the funding and is expected to be about half of the amount requested, according to CPC Administrative Advisor Karen Lee.

The Springfield CPA is overseen by volunteer members who represent the City Preservation Commission, Historic Commission, Planning Board, Parks Commission, Springfield Housing Authority, Springfield Preservation Trust Inc. and three individuals appointed by City Council President Marcus Williams.

According to CPC President Robert McCarroll, the CPC has distributed more than $6 million in CPC funding to community projects over the past four years.

At the April 5 committee meeting, the group saw presentations of several different projects, including improvements to Marshall Roy Park, Venture Pond, restoration of the Godfrey Triangle, Myrtle Street Park, Merrick Park and at Hennessy Park. Each contestant gave a five-minute presentation about their project and their role in improving the community.

Among the notable projects, Kathy Brown of the East Springfield Neighborhood Council discussed Marshall Roy Park’s request for $68,516. After receiving funding from APC in 2021, Brown said the park’s proposed walking trail needs more financial support.

“Between the [coronavirus] pandemic and some additional design requirements, we find ourselves coming back asking you to see our excitement and know the neighborhood is extremely excited about this half mile path around Marshall Roy Field that will be a walking gem for locals of our neighborhood and beyond,” Brown said.

The East Springfield Neighborhood Council member also discussed a request for $120,000 to improve infrastructure at Marshall Roy Park.

Armory Quadrangle Civic Association President Betsy Johnson highlighted Merrick Park’s $250,000 proposal. Located near the Springfield Public Library and several housing redevelopment projects, Johnson said the land is currently unusable. She noted that the area lacks benches, American Disability Act requirements and other recreational facilities.

“We’re looking for something that will encourage library users to want to stop and read. [We also want] the library to have a space where they could even do some programming outside,” Johnson said.

Springfield Parks and Recreation Department members Christopher Seabrooks and Laura Walsh submitted the other CPA requests on behalf of the department.

The other CPA candidates will be presented at the CPC meetings on April 26 and May 3. Thereafter, the CPC will begin deliberations in June and submit its final recommendations to City Council in September.

Readers can view the full application process at https://www.facebook.com/SpringfieldCommunityPreservationCommittee.

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The community preservation committee just authorized 11 projects to spend $670,000. Here’s what you need to know | Berkshires Center https://preservethenati.org/the-community-preservation-committee-just-authorized-11-projects-to-spend-670000-heres-what-you-need-to-know-berkshires-center/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 02:30:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/the-community-preservation-committee-just-authorized-11-projects-to-spend-670000-heres-what-you-need-to-know-berkshires-center/ PITTSFIELD — In a year full of funds, the Community Preservation Committee voted unanimously Monday to recommend full funding for 10 of 11 projects before the body, including two community housing proposals and a relocation plan of a Vietnam commemorative fresco. The odd project — the restoration of the Tiffany stained glass windows in St. […]]]>

PITTSFIELD — In a year full of funds, the Community Preservation Committee voted unanimously Monday to recommend full funding for 10 of 11 projects before the body, including two community housing proposals and a relocation plan of a Vietnam commemorative fresco.

The odd project — the restoration of the Tiffany stained glass windows in St. Stephen’s Church — received a recommendation that would cover more than 80% of its initial funding request.

The committee started the year with nearly $880,000 to use for community projects this year. An off-cycle request to cover the cost of repairs to the roof of the old Morningside fire station and restoration of the Arrowhead barn brought that original amount down to around $774,000. Monday night’s vote by the committee recommends using $670,317 of the money available this year for the 11 projects.

Pittsfield committee backs $100,000 raise to convert Morningside Firehouse to apartments

Here are the three takeaways from the meeting and what you need to know about what’s next.

Housing was a top priority

Throughout the application process, committee members score each project based on the project’s expected impact, alignment with city priorities, feasibility, and level of external support.

This year, only two of the 11 projects deemed eligible for funding were community housing proposals. The projects, both submitted by Central Berkshire Habitat for Humanity, requested $150,000 to build two affordable housing units on Robbins Avenue and $140,000 to build two affordable housing units on Onota Street.

There is nearly $880,000 to spend on community preservation projects in Pittsfield this year. Here are the 11 projects hoping for some of that money

The projects were ranked first and third respectively by committee members who said the benefit of funding the projects was more than evident.

“These are projects that may or may not happen without this level of funding,” said committee member Tony DeMartino. “We have the funds to do it and [Central Berkshire Habitat for Humanity] has a proven track record.

President John Dickson agreed, stating that “given the housing emergency in the city, I think that would be a good use of this funding”.

If in doubt, financeIn most cases, the committee came to the meeting prepared to respond to funding requests from all applicants. The two projects that produced genuine disagreement all ended up being funded.

Members debated whether a plan to build a pocket park at the Francis Avenue lookout and a staircase connecting West Side residents to nearby grocery stores and the Salvation Army fit the definition of open spaces or recreation projects of the Community Preservation Act.

Similar questions about the letter of the deed sparked discussions about whether a proposal to move the Vietnam Memorial Mural to West Housatonic Street really counted as “historic preservation” if most – if not all – painting had to be recreated.

“It shows that we’re not just a group of people sitting around saying I like this project or not, I don’t like it,” said committee member Libby Herland. “We are really trying to comply with the law and the purpose of the funding.”

After members consulted the law, the committee agreed that both projects were within limits and each proposal received a recommendation for funding.

What happens afterwards?

The committee’s recommendation will be presented to City Council for consideration at the May 10 council meeting. The board will decide whether to accept, modify or reject the committee’s recommendation.

Planner CJ Hoss told the committee he thinks council should vote on the plans by the end of May or early June.

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Greenville Preservation Committee Lays Markers | https://preservethenati.org/greenville-preservation-committee-lays-markers/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 19:28:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/greenville-preservation-committee-lays-markers/ The Greenville Historic Preservation Committee, standing in front of the Greenville Elementary School Historic Marker, identified, preserved and installed markers around Greenville to identify significant landmarks. Members of the Greenville Historic Preservation Committee, left to right, are: Matt Uhl, Mark Keeley, Kenny Wells, Amy Wells, with Highland Hills Director Wendy Ivy and members Brittnie Courtney […]]]>

The Greenville Historic Preservation Committee, standing in front of the Greenville Elementary School Historic Marker, identified, preserved and installed markers around Greenville to identify significant landmarks. Members of the Greenville Historic Preservation Committee, left to right, are: Matt Uhl, Mark Keeley, Kenny Wells, Amy Wells, with Highland Hills Director Wendy Ivy and members Brittnie Courtney and Andy Lemon. Not pictured is HPC member Kim Hardin. The Greenville Historic Preservation Committee is planning a Craft Fair and Farmer’s Market, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, May 14, at Greenville Park on Buttontown Road and Highway 150 in Greenville. To promote “Shop Local” and the “City of Greenville”, more than 35 vendors will be set up in the park, which offers a walking path, shelter and play areas for children. Proceeds from the “Shop Local” event will be used by the HPC Committee for the benefit of promoting Greenville’s historical significance. Donations of time, vendor coordination, signs, banner, were donated by Dreamy Jeanie Creations LLC. Sweetland Waste Disposal donated trash cans. Hurley Services to Elizabeth donated Porta Potties. The Georgetown Lions Club donated services for the publicity of the event. Cub Scouts and Girl Scouts as well as volunteers will be working on the day of the event to support the needs of the park and vendors. HPC members are sponsoring this event at Greenville Park and hope it will be the first of many.

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Geneva Historic Preservation Committee Recommends Change of Historic Status for Mill Race Property – Shaw Local https://preservethenati.org/geneva-historic-preservation-committee-recommends-change-of-historic-status-for-mill-race-property-shaw-local/ Sat, 23 Apr 2022 10:30:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/geneva-historic-preservation-committee-recommends-change-of-historic-status-for-mill-race-property-shaw-local/ GENEVA – The Geneva Historic Preservation Commission has recommended approval of a plan to remove the historic boundary from the entire Mill Race Inn property in the city’s downtown area and apply it only to the 1846 limestone blacksmith shop and a smaller portion of the land surrounding it. The plan gives the owner, the […]]]>

GENEVA – The Geneva Historic Preservation Commission has recommended approval of a plan to remove the historic boundary from the entire Mill Race Inn property in the city’s downtown area and apply it only to the 1846 limestone blacksmith shop and a smaller portion of the land surrounding it.

The plan gives the owner, the Shodeen Family Foundation, more leeway to develop it, officials said. The unopposed commission voted in favor of the plan on April 19 after a public hearing.

David Patzelt, representing the Shodeen Family Foundation, had requested the amendment in March, seeking the historic designation to be the old blacksmith shop and a footing around it, rather than the entire 1.4-acre plot.

The former Mill Race Inn restaurant, which was located on the site at 4 E. State St., was demolished in 2011 after being damaged by flooding from the Fox River.

The Shodeen Family Foundation, which purchased the property, had previously recommended razing the forge, but historic landmark status prevented its demolition.

In the current situation, preservation staff did not fully agree with the one foot limit sought by the Shodeen.

Instead, staff recommended that the southern boundary be 20 feet and the eastern boundary 21 feet east of the limestone structure. Staff recommended that the northern boundary be set at the property line abutting State Street and the western boundary be set at the western property line abutting the Geneva Park District’s Island Park, essentially granting the request for a foot for these two sides.

Establishing the eastern boundary 21 feet from the building acknowledges the historic sight of the Alexander brothers’ blacksmith shop, circa 1844-1853; as well as the site of the Rystrom Carriage Shop, from around 1854 to 1878; CE Mann Wagon Manufacturing & Blacksmithing shops, circa 1882-1884; and the CE Mann Cooperage, circa 1882-1891, as recommended by staff.

Establishing the southern boundary 20 feet from the building acknowledges the historic view of the southern wall of the Alexander Brothers Blacksmith Shop, circa 1844-1853, and other institutions throughout the period of significance, circa 1846-1945, per staff recommendation.

Patzelt said he had a “friendly objection” to those 20ft and 21ft limits.

“We believe the Historic Preservation Commission now considers the land around the structure to be historically significant,” Patzelt said. “And this land has been greatly or largely disturbed. … We oppose that.

Patzelt called the recommended 20-foot dimension as having “little or no meaningful basis.”

“Although we have some objections to the staff report, we accept this staff report,” Patzelt said.

In her testimony, resident Patricia McLaughlin said preserving the historic limestone structure is the right choice for the Shodeens and the community.

“Historic structures like this – long term – add value to the entire surrounding property and community and are a charm factor,” McLaughlin said. “However you want to define it, it’s a quality of life good and it’s an economic good.”

Al Watts, director of community engagement for Preservation Partners of the Fox Valley, said the amended landmark boundary should be all that’s needed to ensure the property’s viability.

“There is no doubt that this is historically significant and meets the requirements of a landmark,” Watts said.

“The forge is the oldest industrial building on the east bank of the Fox River in Geneva,” Watts said. “It demonstrates both the importance of the river industry which fueled the colonization of Geneva and with a variety of businesses operating there (and) a timeline of Geneva’s growth.”

Resident Lena Serpico said that as a resident of Bennett Street near the old Mill Race Inn, they lived closer to the property than anyone.

“My neighbors and I are tired of watching it,” Serpico said. “It’s a cesspool. … I saw Shodeen do great things in Geneva. We are tired of looking at an ugly facade every day. We would like something else to be built there.

City Council will make a final decision on the recommendation – either to approve it, further modify it, or reject it.

Patzelt said he would reiterate his objection to the council.

“It’s the first time in Geneva’s history that we’re now starting to declare land that once had something different to be historic – even though there’s no evidence of it left,” Patzelt said. “That’s basically my problem with it. One foot, two feet – why is it 20? »

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BV Preservation Committee Plans Month-Long Celebration | Free content https://preservethenati.org/bv-preservation-committee-plans-month-long-celebration-free-content/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 18:13:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/bv-preservation-committee-plans-month-long-celebration-free-content/ The Buena Vista Historic Preservation Commission will host a Historic Preservation Month in May. This will be the first time the group has organized this national event which will focus on celebrating historic places, heritage and the benefits of restoring historic buildings. “Historic buildings in a city like ours are fragile,” said BVHPC member John […]]]>

The Buena Vista Historic Preservation Commission will host a Historic Preservation Month in May. This will be the first time the group has organized this national event which will focus on celebrating historic places, heritage and the benefits of restoring historic buildings.

“Historic buildings in a city like ours are fragile,” said BVHPC member John O’Brien.

Activities and contests are planned throughout May, starting with a month-long art contest ending Saturday, April 28.

The competition will be aimed at young budding artists who will receive a coloring sheet from the city museum to decorate with the medium of their choice. These pages can then be returned to the Buena Vista Public Library where they will be divided into age groups and displayed. The general public will then be allowed to vote on the play they like, with the most voted play in each age bracket winning the contest.

Contest winners will receive a gift card from a local Buena Vista business and their entry will be framed.

Mary Therese Anstey, member of the BVHCP, expressed the hope that this competition will encourage younger audiences to take an interest in the city’s history, the museum and historic architecture.

“I think it’s great to involve the kids. Everything we do downtown, our efforts to preserve the look of our city, is not for our benefit, it is for future generations,” O’Brien said.

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Pittsfield Community Preservation Committee Begins Review of FY22 Applications / iBerkshires.com https://preservethenati.org/pittsfield-community-preservation-committee-begins-review-of-fy22-applications-iberkshires-com/ Thu, 07 Apr 2022 18:40:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/pittsfield-community-preservation-committee-begins-review-of-fy22-applications-iberkshires-com/ PITTSFIELD, Mass. — The Community Preservation Committee Monday took a closer look at six of 11 Community Preservation Act requests for fiscal year 2022 ranging from $7,500 to $150,000. The panel received presentations on the planning for the Morningside Community School playground, the restoration of the stained glass windows at St. Stephen’s Church and […]]]>

PITTSFIELD, Mass. — The Community Preservation Committee Monday took a closer look at six of 11 Community Preservation Act requests for fiscal year 2022 ranging from $7,500 to $150,000.

The panel received presentations on the planning for the Morningside Community School playground, the restoration of the stained glass windows at St. Stephen’s Church and four nominations from the City of Pittsfield.

These included the relocation and restoration of a Vietnam War memorial mural on East Housatonic Street, repairs to the Clapp Park Little League buildings, phase two of the West End Cemetery restorations and improvements to the Kirvin Park disc golf course.

The rating of the projects by the committee members will be compiled later this month and the city council will address the proposals for a final vote in June.

Morningside Community School is asking for $24,000 to build a playground.

Principal Monica Zanin explained that the school would like to develop a recreation area in the open space behind the school that is accessible to everyone and also gives back to the community.

Ideas for the plan are generated through collaborative work within the school and with the neighboring neighborhood.

In late 2020, the school raised approximately $5,000 to benefit students through a virtual jazz party hosted by five-time Grammy Award-winning musician Questlove, who is the frontman of in-house band “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon’s “The Roots” and just also won an Oscar.

The event titled “Rent Party Jazz” was inspired by author William Miller’s children’s book of the same name about New Orleans in the 1930s. “Rent Party Jazz” is required reading on the Morningside schedule , as it deals with issues such as poverty, racial inequality and evictions.

When the children were asked how they would like to use the money to give back to the community, most ideas came back to improving the school grounds with better recreational facilities and a large open space for fun. of all.

“We wanted to come back here just to talk to you a bit about the proposal to do the amount of work that would be needed to really bring a community together and have lasting effects based on that experience,” Zanin said.

“And righting the wrongs and what the children have learned and how we can, as them living in the community and having family members in the community, how they can come back and continue to use this space forever. “

The school is looking to launch general planning – including student, community and teacher surveys – in September with a plan established by January 2023. Soon after, they would like to apply for building funds.

“We are looking to undertake all public input and some kind of design development of concept designs in the fall, but also in the fall, I know the next opportunity for CPA applications is in the fall of 2022” , Park, Open Space and Natural Resources Program Director James McGrath explained.

“I think the idea was for Morningside School to submit an application with a certain amount of construction funding, almost like a placeholder so that when the project gets to that point it will be fleshed out nicely and Berkshire Design Group will have developed a final construction plan or cost estimate for these upgrades, so I think the school was looking to use the November 2022 bid process for this project, moving it forward a bit faster than the next round.”

Zanin also mentioned that she would like to work with the Berkshire County Sheriff’s Department to remove barbed wire fencing and window bars from the former Second Street Jail that adjoins the school.

One of the CPA’s largest requests, St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church is asking for $150,000 to preserve its stained glass windows.

Property manager and member of the vestry, John Garinther, explained that the church would like to install protective glazing on 14 of its stained glass windows: one balcony window, 11 nave windows and two chapel windows.

The balcony window and nave windows were made by Louis Comfort Tiffany, Mary Elizabeth Tillinghast and an unknown English artist.

The chapel windows were designed and installed by J. Wipell & Co. of Exeter, England in the 1930s.

To protect the windows, the church wants to install frames that best reproduce the lines of the stained glass window. Some repairs to deteriorating window frames are also required.

Garinther said the project would cost around $165,000. If the church receives the CPA money, its endowment fund will cover the difference.

He also described the ways St. Stephen’s benefits the community. The church currently has three tenants: the Cathedral of the Beloved, the Berkshire Immigration Center and the Jewish Family Service, which support Afghan refugees.

The church has a full kitchen that serves 150 meals a week and also lends its space for community groups and performances.

“We have a lot of activity going on and our space needs regular maintenance for that reason,” Garinther explained.

“And as you can imagine, in such a large space, it’s costing us a lot of money, a lot of our budget, and whatever we can get from this grant would allow us to spend more on the other areas that must be maintained.”

There were questions about the eligibility of this project due to an anti-state aid amendment that prohibits the use of public funds to private entities for private gain. Planner CJ Hoss has agreed to consult with City Solicitor Stephen Pagnotta on the matter.

There’s no final decision yet, but Hoss said he doesn’t see a problem with the application due to the historic nature of the structure. He will soon consult Pagnotta.

The city is seeking $9,000 in funding to replace the roof of the Clapp Park Little League building which was built in 1985. The building maintenance department will replace the roof in the fall after baseball season and before Winter.

“It serves a number of Little League uses, it houses restrooms, there’s a concession window where sodas, chips and water are sold which helps support the league, there’s a small area where the league can store tools and equipment to maintain the fields,” McGrath explained.

“The second floor of the building is mostly an enclosed space where they can open a kind of big window and they can see the pitch and that’s where the game scores and the announcers are housed with a view of the fields and then, well sure there is a roof deck for viewing and that is visible on the south side of the building from this view.”

He added that the roof has not been repaired for several years and is compromised by leaks and gaps for animals to get inside.

The funding would be used entirely to purchase supplies such as roofing shingles, new plywood and drywall for the ceiling.

“There’s just, I think, a strong philosophy that young boys and girls in our community deserve to be part of programs that promote teamwork and athletics and all of those things that we hope kids will achieve. on the ground and it really all comes down to the moms and dads and others who help run these programs and they do it all as volunteers,” McGrath said after a board member issued the assumption that the city had excellent baseball teams.

“And major kudos should be given to them because there’s very little involvement from the city and the parks department and little league programs, of course we’re huge supporters and we always answer the phone when they call and help where we can but this is an all-volunteer program that has operated not just in Pittsfield but across the country for many, many years,”

“It’s super successful, and I think that’s part and parcel of being a Pittsfielder.”

The panel also received an update on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Project “Lest We Forget” from
Director of Cultural Development Jennifer Glockner. The city is looking to move it from the corner of West Housatonic and South Street to a new location for better visibility and has requested $15,000 in CPA funds.

Glockner revealed Monday that the mural will be recreated using as much restoration as possible and that the city is considering a place for its relocation.

“We use the word ‘restore’ because we really want the same artistic integrity, but ultimately we’re going to redo whatever mural we think about,” she explained.

“There’s a signage company and an artist involved and so it’s going to be recreated using as much restoration as possible.”

The hope is to move it to 50 Pearl St. near the James E. Callahan Chapter 65 Vietnam Veterans building. The building’s owners have not yet committed to displaying the mural, but Glockner said they are in touch with the city and are an integral part of the project.

“It’s the cart and the horse right now, we’re trying to get all the financing in place to make this happen before owner approval,” she said.

“So we feel very good about that, very optimistic with all the veterans organizations involved and that, again, would take us a bit over the edge.”

The CPA applications reviewed at this meeting are:

• City of Pittsfield Cultural Development/Lest We Forget Mural, $15,000
• Restoration of the Saint-Étienne church and stained glass window, $150,000
• Morningside School/Playground Planning, $24,000
• City of Pittsfield DCD/Clapp Park Little League Buildings, $9,000
• City of Pittsfield DCD/West Park Cemetery Restoration, $13,325
• City of Pittsfield DCD/Kirvin Park Disc Golf, $7,500

Full details of the project are available on the city’s website.

Keywords: PCA,

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Community Preservation Committee Public Hearing, April 13 – WaylandeNews https://preservethenati.org/community-preservation-committee-public-hearing-april-13-waylandenews/ Wed, 23 Mar 2022 18:51:41 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/community-preservation-committee-public-hearing-april-13-waylandenews/ March 23, 2022 Wayland’s Community Preservation Committee (CPC) invites all interested residents to a public hearing on April 13, 2022 at 6:00 p.m. in person at the town building and on Zoom, hosted by the town. The link will be available on the city’s calendar page: […]]]>






Wayland’s Community Preservation Committee (CPC) invites all interested residents to a public hearing on April 13, 2022 at 6:00 p.m. in person at the town building and on Zoom, hosted by the town. The link will be available on the city’s calendar page: https://www.wayland.ma.us/public-body-meeting-information-virtual-inperson-and-hybrid. The topics for discussion will be the five articles that the CPC has submitted for approval by the Annual Municipal Assembly. The CPC will review each article and answer questions from participants.

Wayland passed the Community Preservation Act twenty-one years ago with a 1.5% surtax on annual property tax. Thanks to this surcharge and contributions from the State Trust Fund dedicated to cities that have adopted the CPA, the city has accumulated more than $20 million. All funds must be spent on open space, historic preservation, community housing and recreation. The CPC reviews applications and recommends funding for specific projects for consideration by the municipal assembly.

This year, the Open Space project includes the purchase of 27 Sherman Bridge Road for conservation land. A Historic Preservation Project will fund the preservation and digitization of historic materials owned by the Wayland Free Public Library. Two community housing projects will be considered; one to replace the fire sprinkler system at 89 Oxbow Condominiums – community housing partially funded by CPA funds; and one the purchase of Launcher Way – 12 units for affordable housing.

The meeting/hearing will not last more than one hour.

Come and discover these exciting projects and express your interests and questions.






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