Preservation committee – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 22:35:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://preservethenati.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/nati.png Preservation committee – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ 32 32 Pamplin Media Group – Preservation committee meets again after racist hiatus https://preservethenati.org/pamplin-media-group-preservation-committee-meets-again-after-racist-hiatus/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/pamplin-media-group-preservation-committee-meets-again-after-racist-hiatus/ New temporary rules allow meeting administrator to approve comments during conference call or video sessions Members of the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation will once again attempt to discuss the nomination of several state buildings and sites to the National Register of Historic Places. The nine-member committee meets at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, November […]]]>

New temporary rules allow meeting administrator to approve comments during conference call or video sessions

Members of the State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation will once again attempt to discuss the nomination of several state buildings and sites to the National Register of Historic Places.

The nine-member committee meets at 9 a.m. on Tuesday, November 30 and again at 9 a.m. on Wednesday, December 1 during a conference call to complete work on the nominations that were interrupted in mid-October by someone who posted racist and homophobic comments on an online video conference. The October 21 incident derailed two days of meetings scheduled to discuss local historic sites and properties.

An Oregon State Police investigation into the incident has been closed after failing to find evidence of a crime.

As with any public meeting, everyone will be allowed to listen to or watch the proceedings on video. As a precaution, the State Parks and Recreation Commission on Nov. 17 approved a temporary change to state rules requiring people to submit their comments to the meeting administrator, who will either approve or reject them. . Comments should relate to the proposed nominations.

Instructions on how to participate will be posted on the committee’s web page prior to the meeting. Registration is required to speak at the meeting. To register, go to www.oregon.gov/oprd/OH/Pages/Commissions.aspx#SACHP.

Chris Havel, spokesperson for the Department of Parks and Recreation, said the temporary rules in place for 180 days were developed to “protect the health and safety of our committee members.”

“This will allow us to intercept a repeat of the October 21 incident without exposing anyone else to attack,” Havel said.

“Hateful insults”

The Oct.21 incident came as someone watching the session started writing racist slurs about an hour after the first day of a two-day virtual session. Committee members had begun a discussion about a possible nomination from several Portland-area sites associated with local African-American history, when the person, who has not been identified, began writing what the committee said. described as “racist and hateful insults”. The individual also posted the home addresses of committee members online.

Havel said it was the first time that virtual committee meetings had been interrupted by an intruder, and the first time the committee had to postpone or cancel a session due to outside interference. The person who wrote the posts used an online alias, Havel said.

During the November 30 and December 1 meetings, committee members will review three multiple ownership document proposals: Donald J. Stewart’s architecture in Washington and Oregon; the historic residential resources of Redmond, Oregon; and PWA and WPA Oregon New Deal Resources, 1933-1943.

Members will also discuss a possible nomination from several properties associated with African American history in Portland: Mt. Olivet Baptist Church, Dean’s Beauty Salon and Barber Shop and the Golden West Hotel.

A possible nomination of Portland’s South Park Blocks to the National Register is also on the agenda.

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“Blown Away” Historic Preservation Committee by Design for Vendors’ Plaza Kiosk https://preservethenati.org/blown-away-historic-preservation-committee-by-design-for-vendors-plaza-kiosk/ https://preservethenati.org/blown-away-historic-preservation-committee-by-design-for-vendors-plaza-kiosk/#respond Wed, 10 Nov 2021 03:38:59 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/blown-away-historic-preservation-committee-by-design-for-vendors-plaza-kiosk/ The design renderings for Vendors’ Plaza kiosks by Creations Global Retail incorporate aspects of the historic downtown architecture, such as eaves and arches, while providing more practical features, such as living spaces. storage. (Photo provided by the St. Thomas-St. John Historic Preservation Committee) Saint-Thomas-St. Members of the John Historic Preservation Committee on Tuesday gave the […]]]>
The design renderings for Vendors’ Plaza kiosks by Creations Global Retail incorporate aspects of the historic downtown architecture, such as eaves and arches, while providing more practical features, such as living spaces. storage. (Photo provided by the St. Thomas-St. John Historic Preservation Committee)

Saint-Thomas-St. Members of the John Historic Preservation Committee on Tuesday gave the green light to the design of new kiosks in Vendors’ Plaza, a space that was historically dotted with tents and tables for merchandise.

The application, submitted by the Department of Licensing and Consumer Affairs, includes renderings of Alexander Plastics Inc., doing business as Creations Global Retail, for stand-alone kiosks that incorporate aspects of the historic downtown architecture. town, such as eaves and arches, while also offering more practical features, such as storage spaces. The kiosks will be on casters so they can be easily moved and taken down, according to presenters.

While the final decision depended on the company revising the kiosk color scheme to match the committee approved palette, members said they were overall “blown away” by the attention paid to the kiosk. to the details of Creations Global, which has been incorporated through work with historian VI and culture carrier Felipe Ayala.

No timeline has been given for construction and installation, but in meetings with vendors over the past month, DLCA Commissioner Richard Evangelista said kiosks are expected to arrive within four to six. next months. Meanwhile, Vendor Square reopened on November 1 after being closed for more than a year due to the global COVID-19 pandemic, with a range of social and health distancing protocols in place, including the reduction in the number of vendors from 54 to 17 to leave more space.

With one authorized seller per square, the spots are in rotation, with mandatory masks and handwashing stations installed. A lottery will be held to determine where each vendor will be in the rotation, Evangelista said. The tents will remain until the kiosks are set up.

On Tuesday, Evangelista also addressed issues that weren’t necessary for the design app but were of concern to the community, such as subletting vendor locations. By law, sellers pay $ 200 for the spot and $ 65 for a license, but Evangelista said he received reports that they were re-let for more than $ 1,200 per month. The commissioner said he planned to assign someone from the DLCA to regularly monitor compliance. In addition, he said there had also been reports of vendor vans occupying parking spaces near the plaza for long periods of time.

All non-functional or abandoned vehicles have been removed and vendors will be advised to park elsewhere, such as the Fort Christian parking lot.

St. John’s Utility Landfill Project
Over the summer, work at Cruz Bay as part of a phased initiative to bury the Saint John power grid was halted after human bones have been observed in a trench that was dug at the western end of the historic district. Historic preservation gave the VI Water and Power Authority permission to begin work, including, according to committee members, the potential to find artifacts or remains, as the work would essentially divide a larger burial space and full. An archaeologist remained on site for the duration of the project, which was ultimately arrested while authorities determined the best course of action.

Speaking to the source on Tuesday, Kurt Marsh Jr., a member of the Historic Preservation Committee, explained that discussions with Public Works about a potential space at the site for the re-internment of the remains were progressing.

“What has been helpful during this process is the level of continuous communication between all entities,” Marsh said, adding that as the project progresses, it is expected that even more Historic artifacts are found along the waterfront, offering more potential for “sourcing” or time stamping materials.

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The historic house is razed before the preservation committee finishes its work https://preservethenati.org/the-historic-house-is-razed-before-the-preservation-committee-finishes-its-work/ https://preservethenati.org/the-historic-house-is-razed-before-the-preservation-committee-finishes-its-work/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 00:54:08 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/the-historic-house-is-razed-before-the-preservation-committee-finishes-its-work/ The historic house is razed before the preservation committee finishes its work Property Posted: Wednesday 03 November 2021 19:37 Joanne wallenstein Despite a discovery by a prominent architectural historian that a 1920s Tudor house designed by W. Stanwood Phillips was worth preserving under current Scarsdale code, the house was virtually demolished. A request to shave […]]]>

The historic house is razed before the preservation committee finishes its work

Despite a discovery by a prominent architectural historian that a 1920s Tudor house designed by W. Stanwood Phillips was worth preserving under current Scarsdale code, the house was virtually demolished.

A request to shave the house at 41 Hampton Road was considered at the June 29 and July 27, 2021 meetings of the Historic Preservation Committee. After the June meeting, the Committee for Historic Preservation sought the advice of architectural historian Andrew Dolkart, who concluded that the house deserved to be preserved.

In his opinion, he noted:

“The most talented architects working in revival styles, especially medieval inspired styles, have often provided details that make the house look centuries old and weathered over time. or that it was built with primitive technologies. He says, 41 Hampton Road shows this in “the irregular texture of the heavy slates of the roof, in the carefully grooved woodwork that Phillips specifically noted on his elevation drawings, in the turned and squared, medieval balusters, in the stylized detail of the spandrels, keystone and lintel of the entrance arch, in gable overhangs with drip pendants, etc.

He also observes that the house has retained its architectural integrity to a very high degree as “the windows, slate roof, woodwork, masonry and other elements of the building all appear to be original.”

His criteria for deciding that the house deserved to be preserved were as follows:

1. The house is the work of a master as designed by architect W. Stanwood Phillips, a renowned architect who was “closely involved in creating the character of the village.”

2. The house is the “quintessential home in Scarsdale” and is part of the “quintessential home”large diagram of the history of Scarsdale. “

3. The house embodies the “distinctive features of an English Tudor Revival style home “and uses the style” in an extremely creative way to create a fine example of the suburban middle class architecture that sets Scarsdale apart.

Due to two committee members not attending the July 27 meeting, Chairman Adam Lindenbaum postponed a decision until the full committee could be present the following month. The request was again adjourned to the next committee meeting on September 28. (There was no meeting at 41HamptonDemolitionThe BAR authorized the demolition of 50% of the house.August.)

However, the applicants did not wait for a decision from the Historic Preservation Committee before asking the Board of Architectural Review to demolish much of the house. On August 23, then-owner Stewart Hung obtained approval for what was called a “front addition” to the house. The documents show that the BAR approved the demolition of 50% of the structure and the removal of “stucco beams and bricks,” the distinguishing features listed in historian Dolkart’s note. The Board of Architectural Review has approved architect Miguel Sostre’s plans to build a 9,500 square foot house that bears no resemblance to the original historic structure.

This week, Brite Avenue Development, owned by Eilon Amidor, demolished much of the house, driveway, windows, masonry and more. Brite Avenue Development is now listed as the owner of the house.

It is not clear why the Board of Architectural Review (BAR) reviewed and approved the demolition while the preservation request was still pending before the Committee for Historic Preservation and likely to justify preservation. Curiously, the request for the demolition of the house to the Committee for Historic Preservation continues to appear on the monthly calendars and has been marked “Adjourned” on September 28 and October 26, 2021.

On November 4, the Committee for Historic Preservation released the agenda for its November 30, 2021 meeting and the applicant is now applying to “Demolish the remaining 59% of the house with garage built in 1930.

In granting the developer permission to demolish 50% of the historic house, did the Board of Architectural Review consider the preservation of the historic elements of the house, its facade, its grand entrance and the elements that Dolkart listed in its note? Has anyone from the Board of Architectural Review spoken to the members of the Committee for Historic Preservation committee?

41HamptonFront

Demolition

(Before and after: According to the CHP, they only destroyed 41% of the original house.)

From the property record, it appears the building department was well aware of the developer’s plans as they authorized the removal of 14 trees on September 8, 2021 and approved a ‘front addition, a new circular driveway. and a stormwater management system ”on October 16, 2021.

41HamptonNew elevationThe BAR approved the construction of a 9,500 square foot house. The shaded part on the right is the vestige of the existing structure.

It would be nice to better understand what happened. Can simultaneous candidatures be submitted to both committees? Does the village need to revise its procedures for submitting an application to the Historic Preservation Committee and the Architectural Review Board? What does it mean to preserve a historic house? Should we save the facade? And the architectural details?

We emailed our questions to Frank Diodati who heads the construction department, the chairman of the architectural review committee, the CHP members, the village director and the mayor and received no response.


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Cool to Plans for Cruz Bay Ferry Dock Historic Preservation Committee https://preservethenati.org/cool-to-plans-for-cruz-bay-ferry-dock-historic-preservation-committee/ https://preservethenati.org/cool-to-plans-for-cruz-bay-ferry-dock-historic-preservation-committee/#respond Sat, 16 Oct 2021 06:29:21 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/cool-to-plans-for-cruz-bay-ferry-dock-historic-preservation-committee/ The master plan for the ferry wharf structures was challenged at Thursday’s meeting. (Screenshot) For years, the Virgin Islands Port Authority has declared plans to upgrade the hurricane-damaged Loredon L. Boynes Sr. ferry dock at Cruz Bay, including the ticket office and waiting area structure. . But based on the response to the plans unveiled […]]]>
The master plan for the ferry wharf structures was challenged at Thursday’s meeting. (Screenshot)

For years, the Virgin Islands Port Authority has declared plans to upgrade the hurricane-damaged Loredon L. Boynes Sr. ferry dock at Cruz Bay, including the ticket office and waiting area structure. .

But based on the response to the plans unveiled at Thursday’s St. Thomas-St. John Historic Preservation Committee is back to the drawing board for designers working with the Virgin Islands Port Authority.

The ferry dock upgrade was one of six projects on St. John, with two on St. Thomas, being discussed during the three-and-a-half-hour public portion of the online meeting. It is also the project considered to have the greatest impact, as thousands of residents and visitors depend on the facility when traveling between St. Thomas and St. John.

The plan presented by the port authority includes a series of awnings to protect against the elements, as well as the addition of a unisex bathroom that meets U.S. disability law standards. While these amenities are considered desirable, committee members agreed that the design was poorly designed.

“This is the gateway to St. John,” committee member David Knight Sr. told Dale Gregory, deputy director of engineering for the Port Authority, adding: “It looks like you don’t ‘made no attempt to think about aesthetics or what we’ I’m trying to portray – nothing welcoming people to the house, nothing reflecting our heritage.

Members of the Historic Preservation Committee objected to many design features, including Bahama shutters instead of the more traditional louvered windows. Committee members also criticized the outlines of the canopies that were not incorporated into the design of the existing structure, and the shed-like structure for the bathroom “which looks like an outhouse,” according to Knight.

Asked by committee member Kurt Marsh, Gregory said the port authority was unaware that the Cruz Bay wharf was in a nationally registered historic district with design restrictions. Port Authority architects did not consult with the Virgin Islands State Historic Preservation Office or the Historic Preservation Committee.

The six members of the committee voted unanimously to continue the application pending a new architectural revision.

“We will take your comments for further consideration and address concerns if we can,” replied Gregory.

White brackets indicate the area where the St. Thomas Federal Credit Union kiosk was offered inside the customs lot near the utility pole. (Screenshot)

In other cases, the committee discussed plans presented by Keisha L. Richards, CEO of St. Thomas Federal Credit Union.

Richards said the credit union has already reached an agreement with the Virgin Islands Port Authority to place a kiosk containing an ATM at the entrance to the parking lot – known locally as the customs lot – in front of the office From post.

While committee members generally approved of the kiosk design, they did not approve of the location chosen.

“My concerns relate to the port authority. We already have an exacerbated parking situation in Cruz Bay, ”said Marsh, referring to an ongoing battle over the high fees imposed by the port authority on the largest gravel lot near the barge terminal. “We can’t bear to lose another parking spot. “

Committee members also expressed doubts about the safety of customers and possible damage to the kiosk due to traffic and congestion at the proposed site. They suggested several other sites, including the fenced area adjacent to the tourism office, in Frank Powell Park behind the bandstand towards Meada’s Plaza, and the neighboring port authority property where a customs caravan was located. and immigration during the construction of their new building. .

The committee voted unanimously to continue the application.

The east face of the old Fish Trap restaurant. (Screenshot)

The committee also heard requests from two restaurants in Cruz Bay seeking committee approval and reviewed photos submitted by Nael Ahmad, the new owner of the former Fish Trap restaurant in Raintree Terrace.

Ahmad submits plans to expand the restaurant’s parking lot. Ahmad said parts of the restaurant, including a patio, were built with “bad wood” – lumber sold throughout Saint John several years ago as pressure treated lumber, but has since degraded. .

Nael Ahmad, bottom right, joined the meeting to discuss the construction of the former Fish Trap restaurant. (Screenshot)

Ahmad said he wanted to enclose the east side of the building with glass or plexiglass and sought the advice of the committee before going any further.

Committee members agreed that because some structural materials were compromised, more detailed design drawings were needed. The committee voted unanimously to continue the request pending the submission of other architectural and technical drawings.

Ralph Salomon and Myrah Keating Smith II. (Screenshot)

The Committee agreed to hear from the owners of another restaurant in Cruz Bay, although their candidacy was not placed on the agenda.

Ralph Solomon and Myrah Keating Smith II, owners of the shopping and dining complex known as Meada’s Plaza, have asked the Historic Preservation Committee to approve the addition of a covered shelter outside the entrance to restaurant customers.

Keating Smith said when the tourist season picks up, diners often arrive a few minutes early, but there is little room left to stand while waiting to be seated. With COVID-19 social distancing requirements, an additional waiting zone is needed.

Committee members spent a lot of time discussing the regulations that apply to awnings in the historic district of Charlotte Amalie. The regulations also apply to the Historic District of Cruz Bay, as new guidelines for Cruz Bay have not yet been established.

The canopy shelter shown as a sketch at the meeting could not be authorized, committee members decided. When the owners were asked to come back with an amended plan at the next monthly historic preservation meeting, restaurant manager Ramon Namphy asked if other arrangements could be made to speed up the process. He said he is looking to avoid ongoing construction when the restaurant opens in a few weeks.

The committee voted (with one abstention) to allow the owners to redesign the shelter and meet with Sean Krigger, director of the State Historic Preservation Office. With Krigger’s approval, the owners could proceed with the construction. But, in any case, they would have to remove a rainbow awning that now extends over a sign on the second level.

Two other St. John issues were also discussed.

The first was the construction of a concrete bridge built along Cruz Bay Beach south of the ferry dock. The owner of the bridge has not followed plans approved by the Historic Preservation Committee, and “a legal and informal administrative process” is underway, according to JP Oriol, commissioner of the Planning and Natural Resources Department. If no resolution is found, “a formal hearing process to determine the non-compliance and corrective action will be taken,” said Oriol.

The committee also discussed a report outlining the scope of additional excavation work on the road near the Cruz Bay cemetery. Work on an underground power line installation project was halted last month when human remains were discovered.

The report, being prepared by an archaeologist working with FEMA’s office of environmental and historical preservation, is still pending, Oriol said.

Two project plans in the Historic District of St. Thomas were unanimously approved by the committee at Thursday’s meeting.

Jason Charles, owner of a vacant lot at 13 and 12-A Borger Gade, requested that the lot be leveled and paved to provide parking for apartments in two neighboring buildings. Charles said he was renovating buildings, hoping to attract middle-class tenants who would need parking to move into an area with limited street parking.

The committee also re-approved plans originally approved in 2016 to add a hipped roof to a chalet on a Prindsens Gade property.

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Lakewood Eye Preservation Committee | News, Sports, Jobs https://preservethenati.org/lakewood-eye-preservation-committee-news-sports-jobs/ https://preservethenati.org/lakewood-eye-preservation-committee-news-sports-jobs/#respond Wed, 29 Sep 2021 06:30:42 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/lakewood-eye-preservation-committee-news-sports-jobs/ Pictured are members of the Lakewood Village Board of Directors at a meeting this week. LAKEWOOD – The Lakewood Village Board of Directors voted this week to appoint Trustee Edward McCague as chairman of the Village Historic Preservation Steering Committee. The council tabled the measure that would create the committee until its next meeting on […]]]>

Pictured are members of the Lakewood Village Board of Directors at a meeting this week.

LAKEWOOD – The Lakewood Village Board of Directors voted this week to appoint Trustee Edward McCague as chairman of the Village Historic Preservation Steering Committee.

The council tabled the measure that would create the committee until its next meeting on Tuesday, October 12.

The Historic Preservation Steering Committee, once established, will investigate and report to the Mayor of Lakewood and the Board of Trustees on various areas including the Lakewood History Museum, Village Hall and Village Historic Preservation. This will also include a comprehensive assessment of the condition and location of the Lakewood History Museum, zoning areas that will reinforce the goals of the village’s historic preservation efforts, and investigative measures to help preserve the room. festivals.

McCague will be given the task of recruiting committee members to serve on the committee.

Mayor Randy Holcomb said the reason for the creation of the new steering committee is the fact that the historian of the Lakewood History Museum has retired and the village clerk has since shown around the historic center.

“The village hall, of course, is an older building and I think that has always been on people’s minds” said Holcomb.

Administrator Ellen Barnes said part of the committee’s creation was looking at the “Museum placement.”

“Where it can be, it is perhaps more of an access to the main street”, said Barnes. “This is a study just to see what can be done and what our options would be of having this museum and not necessarily in the basement here, but it may be a perfect place for it. But, I think it’s up to the steering committee to look at these things and the possibility of increasing and staffing, maybe hours. There is no sign around that even says the History Museum is open. There are things that can be done.

She brought up the possibility of someone writing “Historical texts” to entice people to visit the museum.

“I would say that the preservation of the village hall and the historic preservation of the village is a good idea, and the zoning is a very good idea because I think it helps the community to remain a community when you have the preservation of your history with another zoning which is in place and to come ”, said Barnes. “There are things that are happening that most of the people who will grow up in this community in 25 to 30 years will be happy to see it happen. “

After a membership discussion whether to limit it to three or five, the board decided to postpone the measure until the next meeting.

McCague said the village has a “a vast and rich history that should not be lost.”

The next board meeting will be on Tuesday October 12 at 6:30 p.m., a change from the previously scheduled meeting on Monday October 11. The change was made due to the Columbus Day holiday.

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Slatington History Preservation Committee to Sponsor Third Annual Cemetery – Times News Online https://preservethenati.org/slatington-history-preservation-committee-to-sponsor-third-annual-cemetery-times-news-online/ https://preservethenati.org/slatington-history-preservation-committee-to-sponsor-third-annual-cemetery-times-news-online/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 12:06:03 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/slatington-history-preservation-committee-to-sponsor-third-annual-cemetery-times-news-online/ Posted on September 22, 2021 8:03 AM They will be able to stroll in the sun and, along the way, visit the graves of several prominent families and individuals who have helped the village of Slatedale prosper. The Slatington History Preservation Committee will present “A Walk Among Slatedale Notables” at 2 pm Saturday at Slatedale […]]]>

Posted on September 22, 2021 8:03 AM

They will be able to stroll in the sun and, along the way, visit the graves of several prominent families and individuals who have helped the village of Slatedale prosper.

The Slatington History Preservation Committee will present “A Walk Among Slatedale Notables” at 2 pm Saturday at Slatedale Cemetery, 8648 Brown St., Slatedale.

Dick Smith, Chairman of the Slatedale Cemetery Board, will give a brief history of the cemetery, followed by presentations on the Wilson German family, the Joseph German family, the Reuben Kern family, the James P. Kern family, the Peter Kern family, Dr. Ralph Sowden family, and the Francis Shenton family. The rainy date is Sunday.

The donations will go towards the site of the future museum, according to Robert Stettner, treasurer of the group.

Stettner said the plan is to eventually have a museum in the area that would showcase the slate industry, agriculture and schools in the Northern Lehigh area.

Stettner said this will mark the cemetery’s third march to showcase each of the cemeteries in the Northern Lehigh area.

“We are presenting Slatedale this year,” Stettner said. “We’re going to highlight some of the families and individuals who have helped him grow and develop faster.”

Stettner noted that in 2019, “A March with Slatington Businessmen” was held at Union Cemetery. In 2018, “A Walk Among The Slate Barons” took place at Fairview Cemetery.

“In 2020 COVID took over, but now we’re back on track and in cemeteries,” he said. “They can attend and learn a bit of history.”

He said the group was also working on several other books, including Berksie Railroad and the 40th Anniversary of the 1982 Northern Lehigh High School State Basketball Team.

Stettner said the committee plans to organize walks to Friedens Cemetery in 2022, and possibly Heidelberg Township in 2023.

Judy Gellis-Snyder, President, explained the historical importance of cemeteries.

“We are very fortunate that the cemeteries are very well maintained,” Snyder said. “We are grateful to have these cemeteries.

For more information, contact Snyder at 610-767-5935, timjudy@yahoo.com, or visit them on Facebook.

The Slatington History Preservation Committee will present “A Walk Among Slatedale Notables” at 2 pm Saturday at Slatedale Cemetery. Pictured, left to right, Susan Kern, public relations; Robert Stettner, treasurer; Judy Gellis-Snyder, President; and Tim Snyder, first vice-president. TERRY AHNER / NEWS TIMES


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College Station Historic Preservation Committee 108th marker presented – WTAW https://preservethenati.org/college-station-historic-preservation-committee-108th-marker-presented-wtaw/ https://preservethenati.org/college-station-historic-preservation-committee-108th-marker-presented-wtaw/#respond Wed, 01 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/college-station-historic-preservation-committee-108th-marker-presented-wtaw/ Image of the city of College Station. A house that was originally located on the Texas A&M campus gets the 108th historic marker for the city of College Station. Historic Preservation Committee Chairman Gerald Burgner made the presentation at the last Anderson-Dresser House City Council meeting at 501 Fairview. The house was originally located at […]]]>
Image of the city of College Station.

A house that was originally located on the Texas A&M campus gets the 108th historic marker for the city of College Station.

Historic Preservation Committee Chairman Gerald Burgner made the presentation at the last Anderson-Dresser House City Council meeting at 501 Fairview. The house was originally located at 281 Ferguson Street, which no longer exists. The approximate location of the original site would be near Wellborn Road between Joe Routt and Old Main.

The structure was built in 1911 and was later the home of Col. Frank G. Anderson, a Texas A&M track coach who coached the 1956 Olympics. Anderson also served as the second mayor of College Station from 1940 to 42.

Among those attending the presentation was Anderson’s son Frank Jr.

The house was also occupied by City Councilor Linda Harvell, whose parents purchased the house in 1954, as well as State Chemist R. Treichler and College Station City Secretary NM McGinnis.

Click HERE to read and download the presentation from the College Station City Council meeting on August 26, 2021.

Click below to hear the presentation from the College Station City Council meeting on August 26, 2021. Speakers are Gerald Burgner and Linda Harvell.

Listen to “College Station’s 108th Historic Marker Featured” on Spreaker.


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Loon Preservation Committee takes care of two loon rescues | Nautical https://preservethenati.org/loon-preservation-committee-takes-care-of-two-loon-rescues-nautical/ https://preservethenati.org/loon-preservation-committee-takes-care-of-two-loon-rescues-nautical/#respond Fri, 27 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/loon-preservation-committee-takes-care-of-two-loon-rescues-nautical/ Last month, the Loon Center received a call regarding a loon in distress on Skatutakee Lake in Harrisville. After days of heavy rain, the lake level had risen, creating a current that carried the male plunge above the dam and into the Nubanusit stream below. The loon was washed away about a quarter of a […]]]>

Last month, the Loon Center received a call regarding a loon in distress on Skatutakee Lake in Harrisville. After days of heavy rain, the lake level had risen, creating a current that carried the male plunge above the dam and into the Nubanusit stream below. The loon was washed away about a quarter of a mile into Nubanusit Creek, and the appellant found it sitting in a quiet spot near a bridge on the East View Trail. Water levels in Nubanusit Creek were high, and the loon was out of reach and surrounded by strong currents.

As LPC biologists Elaina Badders and Mary Caffrey gathered the necessary equipment for a rescue, the center called Brett Amy Thelen, scientific director of the Harris Center for Conservation Education, to keep an eye on the loonie until it arrived.

By the time biologists arrived, the loon had been carried further downstream and out of sight, crossing stretches of raging rapids. The group, joined by Thelen’s husband Russ Cobb, searched for the loonie along the creek, following it for 800 meters through the woods. As their research progressed, the conditions became more dangerous. The creek was in flood and some sections had dangerous currents. When a thunderstorm erupted, the rescue team ended their search overnight.

The next morning, Thelen and Cobb returned to the area, determined to locate the loonie. They hiked a quarter mile on the East View trail before heading to the creek. After another quarter of a mile, they still hadn’t located the loonie. They were about to give up when they heard him call. Following the noise, they located the loon, which had managed to get out of the stream and onto the shore. They called the LPC and Caffrey returned to the area to help bring the loon back to the trailhead. After a half-mile hike carrying the loon, the loon was loaded into a box and transported to Maria Colby of Wings of the Dawn Wildlife Rehabilitation for examination and observation. Although his feet were a bit scratched, the loon did not have any major injuries or underlying issues, and he has shown he is able to swim, dive and catch fish. After a night of observation, the dive was banded and returned to its lake, where it reunited with its mate and two young chicks. This incredible rescue would not have been possible without a dedicated team of people looking for the loonie.

As the Skatutakee rescue unfolded, another New Hampshire loon was in need of help as well. That same week, an LPC team undertook what they believed to be a routine banding trip over Mascoma Lake to Enfield. Aside from heavy fog, the banding trip seemed relatively routine at first glance: it captured both of the pair and their chick, and all of the dives were acting normally. The next day, while doing our routine tests on blood taken from adult loons the night before, they discovered a problem: the pair’s male loon had blood lead levels of 25.8 micrograms per deciliter. This is a high lead level for a loonie, approaching but not quite at the fatal level. If the LPC could not recapture the loonie and remove the lead object from its gizzard, its condition would decline rapidly and it would die of lead poisoning.

The following night, LPC field biologists Caffrey, Phil Keefe and Jayden Jech returned to Mascoma Lake. Armed with a searchlight and a capture net, they searched for the loons family. Fortunately, the rescue attempt went well and within an hour, they had the loonie in hand. Just after midnight, the loon was transported to Wings of the Dawn Wildlife Rehabilitation. The next morning, an x-ray revealed a lead object in the loon’s gizzard. The loon was transported to the Tufts Wildlife Clinic at Cummings Veterinary Medical Center for gastric lavage – a process in which small volumes of fluid are used to flush items from the stomach and digestive tract.

Typically, loons don’t show signs of lead poisoning until it’s too late to save them. The LPC was fortunate that the banding work allowed them to catch this case of lead poisoning early on, before the loonie started showing symptoms. Although the future of this loonie is still uncertain, it has a chance of survival. The LPC hopes that once the lead object has been removed and after a few days of treatment, he may be able to bring it back to his lake with his partner and his chick. This story is a reminder to take the tackle unleaded and safe for loons. The smallest piece of lead fishing gear can cause deadly lead poisoning in a loon. LPC encourages all anglers to clean their tackle boxes and get rid of any lead material that persists.

LPC’s lead material buyback program is underway – anglers with lead material to get rid of can receive a $ 10 voucher by visiting loonsafe.org for a list of participating retailers. The person who donates the highest amount of material in each store will receive a prize of $ 100, and the person who donates the second highest amount of material will receive $ 50.


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Historic Preservation Committee redefines role and seeks public input https://preservethenati.org/historic-preservation-committee-redefines-role-and-seeks-public-input/ https://preservethenati.org/historic-preservation-committee-redefines-role-and-seeks-public-input/#respond Thu, 29 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/historic-preservation-committee-redefines-role-and-seeks-public-input/ TINA L. SCOTTEDITOR The Town of Merrill Historic Preservation Committee has met monthly since February and has spent several months reassessing its role. Previously, according to the city ordinance, they were responsible for proposing and / or approving nominations for historic districts, houses and / or sites in the city, as well as holding hearings […]]]>

TINA L. SCOTT
EDITOR

The Town of Merrill Historic Preservation Committee has met monthly since February and has spent several months reassessing its role. Previously, according to the city ordinance, they were responsible for proposing and / or approving nominations for historic districts, houses and / or sites in the city, as well as holding hearings before designating them as such. They also had broad powers related to setting standards for properties designated as historic and regulating the construction, reconstruction, alteration and / or demolition of those properties, all in some detail. .
The demise of the TB Scott Mansion earlier this year prompted the committee to start meeting regularly to hopefully prevent the demolition of historic properties without specific committee review and approval and greater public awareness, and to also begin to play a more active role in promoting the preservation of the historic properties of the community.
Initially, Committee members discovered that they might have different visions of the Committee’s purpose, and it took some time for them to come up with a common vision to move forward, but during the meeting of the Historic Preservation Committee on July 7, the group considered a huge change to their previous role (s) and recommended that the ordinance be amended accordingly.
Now, the public will have the opportunity to provide their views at a public hearing hosted by and prior to the Merrill Town Planning Commission on Tuesday, August 3 at 6:00 p.m. in the Council Chamber at Town Hall in Merrill. [To attend remotely, call 225.800.2151 and enter PIN # 456 483 877#.]
A New Look at Historic Preservation
“In light of the recent demolition of many historic structures in Merrill, the Merrill Historic Preservation Committee has been activated to be a watchdog for iconic Merrill structures,” said Steve Sabatke, City Councilor and Committee Member of historical preservation.
“The intention of this committee is not to interfere with building owners, but to showcase Merrill’s heritage, instill pride in ownership and promote the beauty of our city. Therefore, the Merrill Historic Preservation Ordinance has been amended to help, advise and motivate building owners rather than restricting them, ”he said of the amendment being discussed. the public hearing.
Proposed changes to the ordinance
The public hearing will focus on the proposed amendment to the Town of Merrill Historic Preservation Ordinance. 105-314 to 105-322, which will change the scope and powers of the Historic Preservation Committee.
If this amendment is adopted, the main role of the Historic Preservation Committee will be to:
• Assign historic structure designations to properties, IF owner consents to designation.
• Recognize historic structures, sites and neighborhoods with an appropriate plaque.
• Cancel designations of historic structures to properties at the request of the owner.
• Review requests for demolition of historic structures and reject or approve them and issue a “historic permit” permitting demolition if demolition is approved.
• Create non-binding historic preservation advisory standards for structures that have received a historic structure designation.
One of the other major differences between the old ordinance and the proposed revised ordinance will be a new emphasis on historic properties by maintaining a “street perspective” which is defined as having a “general resemblance to the outward appearance of d ‘origin of the building or structure from the street or sidewalk’, which is radically different from the detailed list of requirements for buildings designated as historic previously.
Other important changes:
• The revised Ordinance states: “No property may be designated without the express written consent of the owner.
• The membership structure of the Historic Preservation Committee would no longer require that the composition of the Committee include a registered architect, a historian and a licensed real estate broker, but simply two aldermen and three resident citizens.
The intention of the changes
Summary by City Manager Dave Johnson. “Basically, the Committee has expressed an interest in exercising an advisory function rather than an executive function,” he said.
“The goal is to preserve historic structures without making their preservation too onerous for the owner,” Johnson said. “Some cities have historic preservation ordinances that specify the type of materials that should be used when working on a historic home, which can dramatically increase the costs of restoration or preservation. “
“We’re more interested in preserving the ‘street view’ of historic homes, that is, we want them to look old and authentic while being seen from the street.”
“This means that homeowners could install new energy-efficient, maintenance-free windows that are made from materials other than wood but that look like wood. They could replace the old wood coating that will no longer hold the paint with a maintenance-free coating that looks like wood, ”he explained.
“Anyone with a listed historic house and wishing to demolish the structure should apply to the Historic Preservation Committee,” he added.
The ordinance does not address “historic business structures” at this time, but may do so in the future, Johnson said.
The Historic Preservation Committee has also shown renewed interest in recognizing designated historic buildings with a plaque, prepared and erected at the request and expense of the City, where it is readily visible to passing pedestrians.
Provide a contribution
Anyone with ideas or comments on proposed revisions to the order should plan to attend the public hearing, in person or remotely.


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Mahoney & Grove to lead Framingham Community Preservation Committee – Framingham SOURCE https://preservethenati.org/mahoney-grove-to-lead-framingham-community-preservation-committee-framingham-source/ https://preservethenati.org/mahoney-grove-to-lead-framingham-community-preservation-committee-framingham-source/#respond Wed, 28 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/mahoney-grove-to-lead-framingham-community-preservation-committee-framingham-source/ FRAMINGHAM – Former Planning Council Chairman Thomas Mahoney will lead the newly formed Community Preservation Committee. Mahoney was unanimously elected chair at the committee’s very first meeting tonight, July 28. Former District 8 Councilor Judy Grove was unanimously elected vice-chair of the committee. City Clerk Lisa Ferguson began the meeting by swearing in the 9 […]]]>

FRAMINGHAM – Former Planning Council Chairman Thomas Mahoney will lead the newly formed Community Preservation Committee. Mahoney was unanimously elected chair at the committee’s very first meeting tonight, July 28.

Former District 8 Councilor Judy Grove was unanimously elected vice-chair of the committee.

City Clerk Lisa Ferguson began the meeting by swearing in the 9 members.

The 9-member Committee was created by the City Council in 2021, after Framingham voters passed the Community Preservation Act via a November 2020 poll question – 19,078-11,414.

Framingham became the 178th Commonwealth community to pass the Community Preservation Act.

The adoption allowed the City to impose a 1% tax on landowners to pay for open space, historic preservation, recreation and community housing development projects.

The 9-member committee will be responsible for approving the projects.

Under the City Council Ordinance, the Community Preservation Committee “will study and maintain a list of the city’s needs, opportunities and resources relating to community preservation.” The committee consults with existing municipal commissions, including the conservation commission, the historical commission, the planning council, the park commissioners and the housing office, or persons acting in these capacities or exercising similar functions, in carrying out these studies.

The committee will also “review relevant master plans and studies prepared by city officials to better understand land use needs” and “develop a long and short term community preservation program and financial plan for Framingham. which identifies objectives and needs, establishes priorities and establishes evaluation criteria for proposed projects. The financial plan includes a multi-year forecast of revenue and expenditure, including the identification of other sources of public or private funding available. The program and financial plan should be reviewed and updated annually to reflect changes in community needs, priorities and resources.

The city council also determined the composition of the 9-member committee, which includes four appointments by the city council, which were made in June.

The City council named Grove, Mahoney, Eastleigh Farm owner Doug Stephan, and District 6 resident Liz Kaprielian, who has been active with the Rotary Club and Access Framingham.

Mayor Yvonne Spicer vetoed the composition of the committee, arguing that it is the mayor and not the legislative branch of the city, the council should proceed with the appointments of the citizens.

The mayor appoints boards and commissions composed of several members, and the other 5 members of the Community Preservation Committee come from these appointed councils, committees and commissions.

These 5 members are:

The The city council overturned the veto in a 10-1 vtakes away.

Of the 9 members, four live in District 1, two in District 8, one in District 5, and one in District 6.

Kaprielian was elected clerk and Stevens treasurer of the committee.

Kaprielian said she wanted everyone to have a “positive experience” with the Committee.

The committee should meet at least once a month and can meet twice a month as it has a deadline of February 1.

“We have a lot of work to do in a very short period of time,” said Mahoney.

No later than February 1, 2022, the Community Preservation Committee will present to Council the recommended projects for fund credits as follows:
a. acquisition, creation and preservation of open spaces;
b. acquisition, preservation, rehabilitation and restoration of historic assets / resources;
vs. acquisition, creation, preservation, rehabilitation and restoration of recreational land;
D. the acquisition, creation, preservation and support of affordable community housing; and,
e. the rehabilitation or restoration of open spaces and affordable community housing acquired or created with the Fund.

Project recommendations should include the implementation schedule, the expected cost of the project, the requested credits and all other sources of funding. With regard to affordable community housing, the Committee recommends, where possible, the redevelopment of existing buildings or the construction of new buildings on existing sites. Notwithstanding, the Committee may, following a two-thirds vote of the Committee,
submit additional recommendations to the Board for proposed appropriations in a given fiscal year. These recommendations require a two-thirds vote of the entire Board for approval.

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“The committee can set aside funds for future use when sufficient funds are not available at that time. Such a recommendation to the Council for deferred expenditure of money must be earmarked for specific purposes consistent with the preservation of the community. Alternatively, the committee may recommend measures to set aside funds for later general-purpose spending in accordance with the law, ”according to the city ordinance.

By April 1, 2022, the community preservation committee must “submit to the mayor and council an annual administrative and operating budget for the committee for the next fiscal year, which must not exceed five percent (5% ) of the estimated annual budget for that year. Fund income. Council will vote on this request by June 30 at the latest.

“I want this committee and this program to be successful,” said Mahoney.

The committee has scheduled its next meeting for August 9 and will invite the CEO of the Community Preservation Coalition to make a presentation and then have a question-and-answer session with the committee.


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