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Rose Bowl to Receive $ 500,000 Federal Historic Preservation Grant – Pasadena Now

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The Rose Bowl has been named the recipient of a $ 500,000 federal historic preservation grant, stadium officials said on Tuesday.

The grant is part of the Historic Preservation Fund’s Save America’s Treasures program, which is administered by the National Park Service, Rose Bowl officials said in a written statement. This is the first such grant awarded to the establishment, which will mark its centenary next year.

Rose Bowl Stadium director of operations George Cunningham said the money would be put to good use.

“As we approach our 100th anniversary, Rose Bowl Stadium continues to lead the way in providing a premier experience for visitors in a safe, reliable and memorable manner,” he said. “This grant will strengthen key infrastructure needs and is a testament to the continued dedication to the site’s overall importance to society.”

Pasadena Mayor Victor Gordo also applauded the development.

“The Rose Bowl Stadium is a community and cultural icon in Pasadena, and also a generational icon for millions of people around the world. We are grateful for the support of this grant to continue to solidify the infrastructure of the site, ”said the mayor.

The grant was obtained through an application submitted by the Rose Bowl Legacy Foundation, officials said. This will require a matching donation from private contributions.

“The grant will be used at the stadium to support capital improvements at the site, including the renovation and replacement of its gas line, as well as infrastructure upgrades related to CAT6 cabling,” the statement said.

The Rose Bowl has been designated a National Historic Landmark by the National Park Service and the US Department of the Interior since 1987.

This year’s Saving America’s Treasures campaign will distribute $ 15.5 million in total and also bring $ 20 million in additional private and public investment, the Rose Bowl Stadium said.

Preservation is the primary goal, according to National Park Service deputy director Shawn Benge.

“From Rose Bowl Stadium in California to Lucy the Elephant in New Jersey, the Save America’s Treasures program seeks to preserve and rehabilitate some of America’s most important and iconic structures and collections,” said Shawn Benge, deputy director of the NPS.

Rose Bowl Stadium General Manager Darryl Dunn thanked many people within the organization and the community who helped make the grant possible.

“The support provided by key stakeholders at Rose Bowl Stadium has been tremendous and we are very grateful for the support received during the nomination process from Pasadena Heritage, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Bill & Claire Bogaard and members. of Congress Judy Chu and Adam Schiff, ”said Dunn. “The Rose Bowl Stadium is a tremendous asset to the community, and it is deeply appreciated that we have received such great support. “

More information on the National Park Service’s Saving America’s Treasures program is available online at https://www.nps.gov/articles/save-america-s-treasures.htm.

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Jonathan Street Historic Preservation Project Completed | WDVM25 and DCW50

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HAGERSTOWN, Maryland (WDVM) – After years of planning and rehabilitation, the first historic project in a generation is complete.

The 1830 log cabin is now a revised home located on historic Jonathan Street.

Preservation Maryland celebrated its enormous potential with a groundbreaking ceremony.

The event turned out to be a personal and professional event for many who grew up on Jonathan Street and watched the project unfold.

“It’s an opportunity for us to use a historic place to improve a community. we don’t just turn it into a museum or capture it in amber, we take this historic place and so can build a better community, ”said Nicholas Redding, president and CEO of Preservation Maryland.

“We were looking to save 335 North Jonathan Street, but we called in the architects and found that this structure was truly beyond repair. The journey of seeking to save this property really opened the door for us to build a relationship and to save us 417 North Jonathan Street, ”said Reggie Turner, president of the Western Maryland Community Development Corporation.

“Building a rehabilitation alone won’t fix the community, but we hope it shows the power and promise of preservation as a tool to reinvest in places that make Hagerstown and across our state,” Redding said. .

Members of this project say it is the first of many projects to come to Jonathan Street.


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College Station Historic Preservation Committee 108th marker presented – WTAW

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Image of the city of College Station.

A house that was originally located on the Texas A&M campus gets the 108th historic marker for the city of College Station.

Historic Preservation Committee Chairman Gerald Burgner made the presentation at the last Anderson-Dresser House City Council meeting at 501 Fairview. The house was originally located at 281 Ferguson Street, which no longer exists. The approximate location of the original site would be near Wellborn Road between Joe Routt and Old Main.

The structure was built in 1911 and was later the home of Col. Frank G. Anderson, a Texas A&M track coach who coached the 1956 Olympics. Anderson also served as the second mayor of College Station from 1940 to 42.

Among those attending the presentation was Anderson’s son Frank Jr.

The house was also occupied by City Councilor Linda Harvell, whose parents purchased the house in 1954, as well as State Chemist R. Treichler and College Station City Secretary NM McGinnis.

Click HERE to read and download the presentation from the College Station City Council meeting on August 26, 2021.

Click below to hear the presentation from the College Station City Council meeting on August 26, 2021. Speakers are Gerald Burgner and Linda Harvell.

Listen to “College Station’s 108th Historic Marker Featured” on Spreaker.


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Guest Column: Historic Infrastructure Bill Will Improve Minnesota Life For Generations

The heavily bipartisan move will mean residents of Minnesota and across the country will soon see a transformative injection of funds to repair roads, bridges, highways, water systems, railroads, ports and cities. electrical networks.

It is also providing $ 65 billion to bring quality, affordable broadband networks to communities – especially those in rural America – that have for too long struggled to thrive without modern high-speed internet.

In Minnesota, it will jumpstart the economy and help complete hundreds of local projects in communities of all sizes and across the state. The resulting improvements will create and support well-paying jobs across the country and strengthen our country’s efforts to tackle climate change.

Minnesota urgently needs infrastructure investment

The need to invest in infrastructure is clear. For decades, Minnesota has suffered from a lack of funding that has hampered efforts to modernize our systems, made travel less efficient, and hampered economic growth. In fact, the American Society of Civil Engineers gave Minnesota a grade of C on its infrastructure scorecard.

Earlier this year, a senior state transportation official told the Minnesota Legislature that there were more than 800 bridges to be repaired or replaced over the next decade that were not part of the plan. Minnesota Ten-Year Funding.

He also said that without additional funding, Minnesota would find itself in “unprecedented territory” in the years to come for the number of poor highways.

Fortunately, the Senate infrastructure bill addresses these needs by sending Minnesota $ 4.5 billion for freeway upgrades, $ 302 million for bridge replacement and repair, $ 856 million dollars for our transit systems and at least $ 100 million for broadband across the state.

This means that people traveling to cabins in north-central Minnesota could see the funding needed to complete the extension of Highway 371 from a two-lane to a four-lane stretch from Nisswa to Pine. River. Now Minnesota will have the resources to undertake projects like these statewide.

Minnesota to receive $ 100 million to improve broadband

When I first came to the Senate, one of my main priorities was to increase access to broadband. It’s not just fun to have, it’s a 21st century necessity for communities striving to attract families and businesses, and create jobs and economic development.

Broadband connects students to top-notch education and enables healthcare institutions to provide much-needed and often life-saving services, such as telehealth. The current pandemic has shown us how important quality broadband is for people working from home and for students who learn remotely.

Sadly, I’ve heard too many stories of parents in Minnesota being forced into a fast food parking lot to access a connection good enough for their kids to do their homework. And even the best-run businesses struggle to compete – and connect with customers – without quality broadband.

The infrastructure bill changes that. Minnesota will receive a minimum of $ 100 million, which will significantly increase our state’s efforts to connect its 157,000 homes currently without service. It also ensures that new broadband services are affordable and that any new system provides quality connections so that users – especially those in rural areas – are not stuck with substandard or second-class service.

Bill on infrastructure to complete the next budget “Build back better”

While the infrastructure bill is historic, we still have work to do to make the necessary investments that give our nation the tools to succeed, lower taxes and lower costs for working families.

Shortly after the passage of the infrastructure bill, the Senate also approved the outline of our “Build Back Better” budget. Under this budget deal, Congress will work this fall on detailed efforts to dramatically improve our nation’s housing, education, child care and clean energy infrastructure, as well as reduce drug costs. on prescription.

One of my top priorities will be to continue moving our country forward towards a clean energy future by promulgating a clean electricity standard that over time achieves net zero emissions in our electricity sector. It will be at the heart of our efforts to fight climate change, put the United States at the forefront of technological innovation, and create millions of well-paying jobs.

With the passage of the Infrastructure Bill, we are no longer just talking about infrastructure, we are actually achieving results that will improve the lives of millions of Minnesotans, create a generation of jobs and economic growth, and position our country to succeed in the 21st century.

Tina Smith represents Minnesota in the US Senate.


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Loon Preservation Committee takes care of two loon rescues | Nautical

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Last month, the Loon Center received a call regarding a loon in distress on Skatutakee Lake in Harrisville. After days of heavy rain, the lake level had risen, creating a current that carried the male plunge above the dam and into the Nubanusit stream below. The loon was washed away about a quarter of a mile into Nubanusit Creek, and the appellant found it sitting in a quiet spot near a bridge on the East View Trail. Water levels in Nubanusit Creek were high, and the loon was out of reach and surrounded by strong currents.

As LPC biologists Elaina Badders and Mary Caffrey gathered the necessary equipment for a rescue, the center called Brett Amy Thelen, scientific director of the Harris Center for Conservation Education, to keep an eye on the loonie until it arrived.

By the time biologists arrived, the loon had been carried further downstream and out of sight, crossing stretches of raging rapids. The group, joined by Thelen’s husband Russ Cobb, searched for the loonie along the creek, following it for 800 meters through the woods. As their research progressed, the conditions became more dangerous. The creek was in flood and some sections had dangerous currents. When a thunderstorm erupted, the rescue team ended their search overnight.

The next morning, Thelen and Cobb returned to the area, determined to locate the loonie. They hiked a quarter mile on the East View trail before heading to the creek. After another quarter of a mile, they still hadn’t located the loonie. They were about to give up when they heard him call. Following the noise, they located the loon, which had managed to get out of the stream and onto the shore. They called the LPC and Caffrey returned to the area to help bring the loon back to the trailhead. After a half-mile hike carrying the loon, the loon was loaded into a box and transported to Maria Colby of Wings of the Dawn Wildlife Rehabilitation for examination and observation. Although his feet were a bit scratched, the loon did not have any major injuries or underlying issues, and he has shown he is able to swim, dive and catch fish. After a night of observation, the dive was banded and returned to its lake, where it reunited with its mate and two young chicks. This incredible rescue would not have been possible without a dedicated team of people looking for the loonie.

As the Skatutakee rescue unfolded, another New Hampshire loon was in need of help as well. That same week, an LPC team undertook what they believed to be a routine banding trip over Mascoma Lake to Enfield. Aside from heavy fog, the banding trip seemed relatively routine at first glance: it captured both of the pair and their chick, and all of the dives were acting normally. The next day, while doing our routine tests on blood taken from adult loons the night before, they discovered a problem: the pair’s male loon had blood lead levels of 25.8 micrograms per deciliter. This is a high lead level for a loonie, approaching but not quite at the fatal level. If the LPC could not recapture the loonie and remove the lead object from its gizzard, its condition would decline rapidly and it would die of lead poisoning.

The following night, LPC field biologists Caffrey, Phil Keefe and Jayden Jech returned to Mascoma Lake. Armed with a searchlight and a capture net, they searched for the loons family. Fortunately, the rescue attempt went well and within an hour, they had the loonie in hand. Just after midnight, the loon was transported to Wings of the Dawn Wildlife Rehabilitation. The next morning, an x-ray revealed a lead object in the loon’s gizzard. The loon was transported to the Tufts Wildlife Clinic at Cummings Veterinary Medical Center for gastric lavage – a process in which small volumes of fluid are used to flush items from the stomach and digestive tract.

Typically, loons don’t show signs of lead poisoning until it’s too late to save them. The LPC was fortunate that the banding work allowed them to catch this case of lead poisoning early on, before the loonie started showing symptoms. Although the future of this loonie is still uncertain, it has a chance of survival. The LPC hopes that once the lead object has been removed and after a few days of treatment, he may be able to bring it back to his lake with his partner and his chick. This story is a reminder to take the tackle unleaded and safe for loons. The smallest piece of lead fishing gear can cause deadly lead poisoning in a loon. LPC encourages all anglers to clean their tackle boxes and get rid of any lead material that persists.

LPC’s lead material buyback program is underway – anglers with lead material to get rid of can receive a $ 10 voucher by visiting loonsafe.org for a list of participating retailers. The person who donates the highest amount of material in each store will receive a prize of $ 100, and the person who donates the second highest amount of material will receive $ 50.


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Belvedere Historic Preservation and Energy Efficiency Fund awards $ 334,000 to 22 organizations in Maine

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ELLSWORTH & PORTLAND – Grants totaling $ 334,202 have been awarded through the Maine Community Foundation’s Belvedere Historic Preservation and Energy Efficiency Fund. MaineCF donors provided two additional grants totaling $ 13,000 from donor-advised funds.

The beneficiaries include:

  • Fort Kent Historical Society, to restore and repaint the exterior clapboard, doors and windows of the Acadian House Daigle to its 1840 appearance
  • Hubbard Free Library, Hallowell, to insulate and seal the basement and install adequate dehumidifiers to control humidity, dramatically improving energy efficiency and protection of the library collection
  • Peavey Memorial Library, Eastport, to restore exterior masonry with matching mortar and bricks aligned to historic preservation.

A full list of grant recipients is available below and at www.mainecf.org and below.

The Belvedere Historic Preservation and Energy Efficiency Fund supports the preservation, restoration and modernization of historic buildings in Maine. An anonymous donor created the fund in 2007.

The next grant application deadline is June 1, 2022. The online application and guidelines are available at www.mainecf.org. For more information, contact Senior Program Officer Maggie Drummond-Bahl at 207-761-2440 or [email protected]

Based in Ellsworth, with additional staff in Portland, Dover-Foxcroft, Mars Hill and Rockport, the Maine Community Foundation works with donors and other partners to provide strong investments, personalized service, local expertise and strategic giving. to improve the quality of life for all residents of Maine. To learn more about the foundation, visit www.mainecf.org.

2021 grants from the Belvédère Historical Preservation and Energy Efficiency Committee:

Alamo Theater, Bucksport, to restore and repair the Fly Loft in the Alamo Theater building, including repair of masonry, roof and corrugated iron south wall: $ 19,790

Bearnstow, Mount Vernon, to meet infrastructure needs in consultation with Maine Preservation and prioritize a three-year restoration plan: $ 10,000

Farmington Historical Society, to continue improving the structural integrity and energy efficiency of the Octagon House so that its architectural history is preserved and visible year round: $ 15,435

Farmington Public Library Association, to seal library leaks, test for mold and repair damage caused by water entering the building: $ 11,012

The Farwell Project, Thorndike, for the replacement of the roof of the factory dome and the main roof: $ 10,000

First Congregational Church of Blue Hill, to paint and preserve the exterior of the church and the buildings of the rectory of historical significance: $ 10,000

First Universalist Parish Church, Portland, to renovate and repair the windows of the historic church for energy efficiency and increased community use of the building: $ 19,192

Fort Kent Historical Society, to restore and paint the exterior clapboards, doors and windows of the Acadian House Daigle to its 1840 appearance: $ 20,000

Freedom Community Historical Society, to restore the interior first floor walls and exterior clapboards of Keen Hall: $ 14,000

Friend Memorial Public Library, Brooklin, to replace the front four pillars of the 1912 Colonial Revival building: $ 10,000

Lighthouse of the Amis de l’Isle au Haut, to install the entrance door, the frame and the lintels, the bell door, the frame, the lintels and the iron railing, including the associated masonry, as well as that the application of the exterior cladding of the tower: $ 20,000

Le Grand, Ellsworth, for the installation of a modern, energy efficient heat pump system that will provide 100% heating and cooling and outside air transfer: $ 20,000

Hubbard Free Library, Hallowell, to insulate and seal the basement and install adequate dehumidifiers to control humidity, dramatically improving energy efficiency and protection of the library collection: $ 18,873

The Lamb House, Cherryfield, to repair and re-shingle the roof to prevent water intrusion and to install attic insulation for energy conservation: $ 15,000

Peavey Memorial Library, Eastport, to restore exterior masonry with matching mortar and bricks aligned with historic preservation: $ 20,000

Phillips Public Library, to restore the main entrance to the building, including the porch, columns and door, and repair the frames of 38 windows: $ 7,000

Porter Memorial Library Association, Machias, to repair the copper flashing around the reading room fireplace: $ 10,000

Readfield Union Meeting House Company, to restore Meeting House tower and belfry: $ 10,000

Sewall Memorial Congregational Church, Robbinston, to restore the tower spire: $ 20,000

Town of Blue Hill, to rebuild and renovate the entrance steps to Town Hall: $ 15,000

Town of Swan’s Island, to complete preservation plans for Burnt Coat Harbor Lighthouse by completing restoration of lighthouse interior masonry: $ 20,000

Women’s Literary Union of Androscoggin County, Auburn, to repoint and repair three brick chimneys and for an energy efficiency audit at Foss Mansion: $ 18,900

2021 Grants from Donor Advised Funds:

Augusta Colonial Theater, to complete the structural engineering analysis of the theater: $ 12,000

Marshall Point Lighthouse & Museum, St. George Historical Society, to purchase a generator to ensure the safety and preservation of the lighthouse, barn and museum artifacts: $ 1,000.


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Belvedere Historic Preservation, Energy Efficiency Fund 2021 awards grants to 22 organizations in Maine

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Grants totaling $ 334,202 were awarded through the Maine Community Foundation’s Belvedere Historic Preservation and Energy Efficiency Fund. MaineCF donors provided two additional grants totaling $ 13,000 from donor-advised funds.

A full list of grant recipients is available below and at www.mainecf.org.

The Belvedere Historic Preservation and Energy Efficiency Fund supports the preservation, restoration and modernization of historic buildings in Maine. An anonymous donor created the fund in 2007.

2021 grants from the Belvédère Historical Preservation and Energy Efficiency Committee:

 Alamo Theater, Bucksport, to restore and repair the Fly Loft in the Alamo Theater building, including repair of masonry, roof and corrugated iron south wall: $ 19,790

 Bearnstow, Mount Vernon, to meet infrastructure needs in consultation with Maine Preservation and prioritize a three-year restoration plan: $ 10,000

 Farmington Historical Society, to continue improving the structural integrity and energy efficiency of the Octagon House so that its architectural history is preserved and visible all year round: $ 15,435

 Farmington Public Library Association, to patch library leaks, test for mold and repair damage caused by water entering the building: $ 11,012

 The Farwell, Thorndike project for the replacement of the roof of the factory dome and the main roof: $ 10,000

 First Congregational Church of Blue Hill, to paint and preserve the exterior of the church and the buildings of the rectory of historical significance: $ 10,000

 First Universalist Parish Church, Portland, to renovate and repair the windows of the historic church for energy efficiency and increased community use of the building: $ 19,192

 Fort Kent Historical Society, to restore and paint the exterior clapboard, doors and windows of the Acadian house Daigle to its 1840 appearance: $ 20,000

 Freedom Community Historical Society, to restore the interior first floor walls and exterior clapboards of Keen Hall: $ 14,000

 Friend Memorial Public Library, Brooklin, to replace the front four pillars of the 1912 Colonial Revival building: $ 10,000

 Lighthouse of Amis de l’Isle au Haut, to install the front door, the frame and the lintels, the bell door, the frame, the lintels and the iron railing, including the associated masonry, plus apply the exterior cladding of the tower: $ 20,000

 Le Grand, Ellsworth, for the installation of a modern and energy-efficient heat pump system that will provide heating and air conditioning and 100% outside air transfer: $ 20,000

 Hubbard Free Library, Hallowell, to insulate and seal the basement and install adequate dehumidifiers to control humidity, dramatically improving energy efficiency and protection of the library collection: $ 18,873

 The Lamb House, Cherryfield, to repair and re-shingle the roof to prevent water intrusion and to install attic insulation to save energy: $ 15,000

 Peavey Memorial Library, Eastport, to restore exterior masonry with matching mortar and bricks aligned with historic preservation: $ 20,000

 Phillips Public Library, to restore the main entrance to the building, including the porch, columns and door, and repair the frames of 38 windows: $ 7,000

 Porter Memorial Library Association, Machias, to repair the copper flashing around the reading room fireplace: $ 10,000

 Readfield Union Meeting House Company, to restore the Meeting House tower and belfry: $ 10,000

 Sewall Memorial Congregational Church, Robbinston, to restore the tower spire: $ 20,000

 Town of Blue Hill, to rebuild and renovate the entrance steps to the town hall: $ 15,000

 Town of Swan’s Island, to complete the preservation plans for the Burnt Coat Harbor Lighthouse by completing the restoration of the interior masonry of the lighthouse: $ 20,000

 Women’s Literary Union of Androscoggin County, Auburn, to repoint and repair three brick chimneys and for an energy efficiency audit at Foss Mansion: $ 18,900

2021 Grants from Donor Advised Funds:

 Augusta Colonial Theater, to complete the structural engineering analysis for the theater: $ 12,000

 Marshall Point Lighthouse & Museum, St. George Historical Society, to purchase a generator to ensure the safety and preservation of the lighthouse, barn and museum artifacts: $ 1,000

The next grant application deadline is June 1, 2022. The online application and guidelines are available at www.mainecf.org. For more information, contact Senior Program Officer Maggie Drummond-Bahl at (207) 761-2440 or [email protected]


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City adopts guidelines for historic preservation

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Boulder City has a new guidance document for future historic preservation efforts.

“The historic plan is not regulatory,” said Michael Mays, director of community development. “It’s a guidance document.

The Board approved it by a 3-2 vote at its Tuesday August 24 meeting. Councilor Sherri Jorgensen and Councilor Matt Fox voted against.

“I think it’s really important to move forward with this. … This is something that was determined when we created our strategic plan, ”said City Councilor James Howard Adams. “Historic preservation was something that was put there. This was done through public engagement. The public has made it a priority, let historic preservation be something. To move forward, we need an action plan.

Jorgensen said she was afraid to endorse it now because much of the process, including community outreach, took place during the pandemic.

“I just think it would behoove us to ask them for more information (historic owners),” she said. “At least give them the opportunity if we ask them, with their private property, to live up to these standards that we are going to create. “

Mayor Kiernan McManus said the city has been doing polls like this for years and recommended people take a look back at these and what else has been done.

In early 2020, the city hired the Nevada Preservation Foundation to prepare a historic preservation plan for the community.

Blair Davenport, member of the Historic Preservation Committee, thanked the board for its approval.

“The plan is designed to build and support an ethic of sustainable historic preservation,” she said. “It does a great job of outlining a way forward that supports the overwhelming desire of the community to invest in the preservation of Boulder City’s unique historic resources.”

One of the objectives of the plan is to update the structure, powers and functions of the Historic Preservation Committee by giving it the power to approve, conditionally approve or deny a request for alteration or demolition of ‘a historical resource. He would also be able to do the same for new construction in the historic district.

This approval or denial would be based on preservation standards that have not yet been established. Membership requirements for committees would also be updated to include commissioners with professional training.

“I am totally opposed to giving them (the Historic Preservation Committee) the power to deny you a building permit,” said Larry Turner in a public comment. “It’s a citizens’ committee.

Grant Turner also said he was concerned about how this would affect the rights of private landowners.

“This leaves open the possibility that a candidate fulfills all the eligibility conditions and still be refused…. I think a lot of us have really pushed for historic preservation, but giving anyone control over what private owners can do with their own property really exposes the city to a huge responsibility, ”he said. declared.

Although these proposed changes are part of the approved historic preservation plan, they are not yet valid.

“The plan… does not make the recommended actions valid,” Mays said.

Mays said those changes would be brought about by future amendments to the text.

This process would begin with a meeting of the Historic Preservation Ordinance ad hoc committee to discuss changes to the plan and recommendations from the Nevada State Historic Preservation Office. He would then come back to council and council would ask staff to make any changes to the city code.

This process would include many opportunities for public input, according to Mays.

The plan’s objectives for historic preservation include reviewing and amending the city code to conform to current state and federal historic preservation standards; identify and promote historical resources that help define a sense of belonging to the city; foster community support for preservation practices; promote private and public use of historic structures and develop cultural heritage tourism programs based on historical preservation ideals as an economic driver and educational resource for the community.

Contact reporter Celia Shortt Goodyear at [email protected] or 702-586-9401. Follow her on Twitter @csgoodyear.


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Letter: Historic Infrastructure Bill Will Improve Minnesota Lives For Generations

The heavily bipartisan move will mean residents of Minnesota and across the country will soon see a transformative injection of funds to repair roads, bridges, highways, water systems, railroads, ports and cities. electrical networks. It is also providing $ 65 billion to provide quality, affordable broadband networks to communities – especially those in rural America – that have for too long struggled to thrive without modern high-speed internet.

In Minnesota, it will jumpstart the economy and help complete hundreds of local projects in communities of all sizes and across the state. The resulting improvements will create and support well-paying jobs across the country and strengthen our country’s efforts to tackle climate change.

Minnesota urgently needs infrastructure investment

The need to invest in infrastructure is clear. For decades, Minnesota has suffered from a lack of funding that has hampered efforts to modernize our systems, made travel less efficient, and hampered economic growth. In fact, the American Society of Civil Engineers gave Minnesota a grade of C on its infrastructure scorecard.

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Earlier this year, a senior state transportation official told the Minnesota Legislature that there were more than 800 bridges to be repaired or replaced over the next decade that were not part of the plan. Minnesota Ten-Year Funding. He also said that without additional funding, Minnesota would find itself in “unprecedented territory” in the years to come for the number of poor highways.

Fortunately, the Senate infrastructure bill addresses these needs by sending Minnesota $ 4.5 billion for freeway upgrades, $ 302 million for bridge replacement and repair, $ 856 million dollars for our transit systems and at least $ 100 million for broadband across the state.

This means residents of Northwestern Minnesota could see the completion of a necessary bridge connecting East Grand Forks and Grand Forks. It could also bring relief to the small town of Oslo, which has little local tax base to tackle the problems of perennial flooding that overwhelms its roads and literally turns it into an island. Now Minnesota will have the resources to undertake projects like these statewide.

Minnesota to receive $ 100 million to improve broadband

When I first came to the Senate, one of my main priorities was to increase access to broadband. It’s not only nice to have, it’s a 21st A century’s need for working communities to attract families and businesses, and to create jobs and economic development. Broadband connects students to top-notch education and enables healthcare institutions to provide much-needed and often life-saving services, such as telehealth. The current pandemic has shown us how important quality broadband is for people working from home and for students who learn remotely.

Sadly, I’ve heard too many stories of parents in Minnesota being forced into a fast food parking lot to access a connection good enough for their kids to do their homework. And even the best-run businesses struggle to compete – and connect with customers – without quality broadband.

The infrastructure bill changes that. Minnesota will receive a minimum of $ 100 million, which will significantly increase our state’s efforts to connect its 157,000 homes currently without service. It also ensures that new broadband services are affordable and that any new system provides quality connections, so that users – especially those in rural areas – are not stuck with substandard or second-class service. .

Bill on infrastructure to complete the next budget “Build back better”

While the infrastructure bill is historic, we still have work to do to make the necessary investments that give our nation the tools to succeed, lower taxes and lower costs for working families. Shortly after the passage of the Infrastructure Bill, the Senate also approved the outline of our “Build Back Better” budget. Under this budget deal, Congress will work this fall on detailed efforts to dramatically improve our nation’s housing, education, child care and clean energy infrastructure, as well as reduce drug costs. on prescription.

One of my top priorities will be to continue my efforts to move our country towards a clean energy future by promulgating a clean electricity standard that over time will achieve net zero emissions in our electricity sector. It will be at the heart of our efforts to fight climate change, put the United States at the forefront of technological innovation, and create millions of well-paying jobs.

With the passage of the Infrastructure Bill, we are no longer just talking about infrastructure, we are actually achieving results that will improve the lives of millions of Minnesotans, create a generation of jobs and economic growth, and position our countries to succeed in the 21st Century.

Senator Tina Smith represents Minnesota in the United States Senate

This letter does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Forum editorial board or the property of the Forum.


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AEM welcomes the Senate’s commitment to invest in historic infrastructure

The Senate took a step forward this week in advancing legislation that would modernize our country’s infrastructure. By 69 votes to 30, the Senate approved Tuesday the Law on investment in infrastructure and employment, a historic bipartite infrastructure set worth 1,000 billion dollars.

“Equipment makers applaud the US Senate for passing a bold, bipartisan bill that will make a transformational investment in our nation’s infrastructure,” said Kip Eideberg, senior vice president of government and industrial affairs at ‘AEM. “The Law on Investment in Infrastructure and Employment will create nearly 500,000 new manufacturing jobs over the next three years, including more than 100,000 highly skilled and family jobs in the equipment manufacturing industry. Investing in our infrastructure will also help us meet our greatest challenges in ways that improve the quality of life for all Americans, strengthen our global economic position, and protect our planet. “

The capital vote came just days after AEM released a new report from IHS Markit that demonstrated the potential impact of this transformational investment in infrastructure. The report showed that more than 500,000 manufacturing jobs could be created over the next three years; nearly 100,000 of those jobs would be highly skilled, family-run jobs in the equipment manufacturing industry. These statistics sent a positive shockwave across Pennsylvania Avenue. In the debate that led to the adoption of the bill, US Senator Rob Portman (R-Ohio) quoted the report’s findings during a speech on the ground. And in its efforts to gain support for the legislation, the White House highlighted the report in a press release.

“We applaud the unwavering leadership and bipartisan work of negotiators and Senate committees to reach agreement through a collaborative and transparent process,” Eideberg continued. “Senators Kyrsten Sinema and Rob Portman have worked tirelessly to get the bill through the Senate and overcome a myriad of obstacles, and we are grateful for their stubborn focus on bipartisanship. The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act is not only a unique opportunity to rebuild the infrastructure of our country, but also an opportunity to restore our economic competitiveness, improve the capacity of manufacturers of equipment to meet the challenges and opportunities of the 21st century, and improve the lives of all Americans. We urge the House of Representatives to put politics before politics and pass this bill as soon as possible. “

After the bill was passed, the United States House leadership quickly announced a schedule change to bring lawmakers back from the district’s work period earlier than the week of August 23. AEM will continue its proactive outreach by urging members on both sides of the aisle to follow a fast, bipartisan path. move forward and ensure that this unique opportunity to modernize our country’s infrastructure goes to President Biden’s office for signature.

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