executive director – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ Sun, 27 Mar 2022 04:43:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://preservethenati.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/nati.png executive director – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ 32 32 Alexander County Achieves Certified Local Government Status for Historic Preservation https://preservethenati.org/alexander-county-achieves-certified-local-government-status-for-historic-preservation/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 16:30:42 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/alexander-county-achieves-certified-local-government-status-for-historic-preservation/ March 9, 2022 – Alexander County joins 11 counties and 60 cities in North Carolina as Certified Local Government (CLG) through the State Historic Preservation Office and the National Park Service. The commissioners approved an agreement to become a GLC at their March 7 meeting. Connie Kincaid, Business Development Manager at Alexander County Economic Development […]]]>

March 9, 2022 – Alexander County joins 11 counties and 60 cities in North Carolina as Certified Local Government (CLG) through the State Historic Preservation Office and the National Park Service. The commissioners approved an agreement to become a GLC at their March 7 meeting.

Connie Kincaid, Business Development Manager at Alexander County Economic Development Corporation and Staff Liaison for the Alexander County Historic Preservation Committee, presented information about the CLG program and associated benefits. The National Historic Preservation Act established the CLG program to provide financial and technical assistance to preserve historic properties in counties and municipalities that have their own Historic Preservation Commission and program that meets federal and state standards.

Kincaid said a key benefit of being a CLG is the ability to compete for grants to advance local historic preservation efforts. The county will also receive technical assistance and training from the State Historic Preservation Office and participate in appointments to the National Register of Historic Placesas well as other benefits.

The commissioners expressed their appreciation to the Alexander County Historic Preservation Committee for their hard work and dedication.

Along the same lines, the commissioners heard a report from Audrey Thomas, a specialist in historical surveys at the State Historic Preservation Office, regarding the Taylorsville Comprehensive Municipal Study that was completed within the past year. She said the architectural survey creates a lasting record of historic places, promotes a better understanding of local heritage and identifies significant properties. During the project, Thomas inspected 176 individual buildings in the city, including industrial, institutional, religious, commercial and residential properties.

In June 2021, the Downtown Taylorsville Historic District was placed on the state’s Review List identifying potential for listing on the National Register. She determined that 33 buildings in the district are eligible to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places. She said there would be no obligations or restrictions for private owners; however, they would be eligible for tax incentives during federally and state-approved preservation projects.

In other economic development news, David Icenhour, Executive Director of Alexander County EDC, provided information on a $500,000 grant the county received from the North Carolina Railroad Company (NCRR) for the purpose of ranking a site in the Alexander Industrial Park. Icenhour said the goal is to create a rail-served site that will be attractive for future industrial prospect. Alexander County is one of six counties to receive the NCRR “Build Ready Sites” grant.

In addition, EDC received a grant of $632,412 from the GOLD LEAF Foundation in December 2021, which will be combined with the NCRR grant for a total of $1,132,412 for the project, which includes engineering, design and grading.

“We are extremely grateful for the grants from the North Carolina Railroad Company and the Golden LEAF Foundation, and we look forward to seeing this project translate into new jobs and investment for Alexander County,” Icenhour said.

Commissioners unanimously approved the grant agreement with the NCRR.

• County Manager Rick French presented information on Alexander County Courthouse Park, Rotary Performance Stage and splash pad. He said the dedication and ribbon cutting for the Alexander County Courthouse grounds and rotating performance stage is scheduled for Sunday, May 15, with remarks from local officials, special entertainment and vendors. of food. Although the paddling pool will not open until after the inauguration on May 15 this year, the normal schedule is offered from April 1 to September 30 from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

He also discussed a daily fee schedule for renting Courthouse Park, which is free to local nonprofits and for-profits with a $150 maintenance/cleaning fee and a refundable security deposit. of $300. For organizations outside the county, there will be an additional charge. A parks ordinance was also revised.

Commissioners will further review and vote on the park proposals at their April 4 meeting.

• John Wear, Deputy Director of Community and Regional Planning for the Western Piedmont Council of Governmentssubmitted offers for Emergency Watershed Protection Program. A number of local waterways filled with debris following the November 2020 flood.

The Alexander County Soil and Water Conservation District (ACSWCD) received a $79,500 grant from the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). The grant also pays $11,925 to WPCOG for technical assistance.

Wear said the lowest bidder responsible for the project is Shaun Lackey Excavating LLC with a bid of $190,000, which includes chipping and burning debris as it is removed from three sites. Including technical assistance costs, the project totals $209,000. ACSWCD coordinator Pamela Bowman said she would be applying for an additional grant.

The commissioners approved the low bid on the understanding that no county funds are being used for the project at this time.

• County Manager French introduced a number of amendments to the budget order, including an amendment to adjust the employee bonus budget to be paid in March 2022 by $1,000 for full-time employees eligible and $500 for eligible part-time employees.

Chairman Ronnie Reese said he was pleased to be able to offer county staff an incentive. “We try to do certain things to help our employees. When we received the ARPA funding that we use for water infrastructure, it freed up money that we can use for other things like employee bonuses,” Reese said.

• Commissioners held a public hearing on a proposed county ordinance to establish child safety zones in Alexander County. Sheriff Chris Bowman said he received a call several months ago from a concerned parent about a registered sex offender parking at school bus stops. Detectives Buddy McKinney and Dennis Foster began investigating the case and discovered that the state status does not include bus stops in the ‘sex offender illegally present’ section. Sheriff Bowman said Henderson County has passed an ordinance to establish child safety zones and Iredell County is considering passing a similar ordinance.

Detective McKinney said the number one objective of the order is the safety of children and to be able to enforce the prevention of loitering at bus stops.

Commissioners have expressed concern over the issue and support for the order. A special meeting was scheduled for March 21 at 6:00 p.m. via Zoom to vote on the ordinance.

• In the County Manager’s report, Mr. French noted three upcoming events: Alexander County 6/12/24 Hour Race at Alexander Central High School on April 2 and 3, RockyFest on April 23 and the grand opening of the Alexander County Courthouse grounds on May 15.

Consolidated Meeting of the Social Services Council
• Kristy Hunt, senior center director, said programming is beginning to increase at the senior center as COVID-19 cases continue to decline. Participants appreciate the group exercises and music. Staff continue to help with health insurance plans. AARP offers free tax preparation services on Saturdays. A celebration of seniors is planned for May 27 with special music by Rick Cline.

• Billie Walker, Deputy Director of Health, provided an update on COVID-19. Alexander County has a cumulative total of 10,359 cases, with 71 cases in the past 14 days and 21 cases in the past 7 days. There have been 137 deaths associated with the virus. Alexander County has a test positivity rate of 4.8% while North Carolina has a rate of 3.9%.

• Leeanne Whisnant, Director of Consolidated Social Services, provided a Social Services update. She said the state recently conducted the Recipient Eligibility Determination Audit (REDA), which showed 97% approval actions, 96% denial/termination actions, and 96% approval. technical errors. The state requires a minimum of 96.8 percent for all three categories, so the department submitted an accuracy improvement plan to the state. Starting in June, the state will verify 10 records per month until 96.8% is achieved for three consecutive months.

Whisnant reminded the board of the Low Income Water Assistance Program (LIWAP). The department received $50,101, with $29,284.91 used through February 2022.

The department also offers the Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LIEAP). The local DSS received $148,282 from the program, of which $91,400 was used through February 2022. They received an additional $194,512 from the American Rescue Plan Act, of which $71,000 was used through February .

She said there are currently 67 children in foster care, with one adoption in 2021 and four adoptions so far in 2022. There are currently 10 participants in the foster parent class which started in January. If you are interested in one of these programs, call the Alexander County DSS at (828) 632-1080.

March is National Social Work Month. National Public Health Week is celebrated from April 4 to 10.

County Manager French expressed his gratitude to Whisnant and Walker for their hard work during the pandemic.

The Alexander County Board of Commissioners generally meets the first Monday of each month at 6:00 p.m. in Room #103 of the CVCC Alexander Center for Education. The next regular meeting is scheduled for Monday, April 4 at 6:00 p.m. Regular meetings are being recorded and can be viewed on the county’s government channel at Spectrum 192 or on the county’s YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/alexandercountync. Meeting agendas, minutes, videos and more are available on the county’s website at alexandercountync.gov/commissioners.

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As visitation increases, national park officials seek to protect resources | News https://preservethenati.org/as-visitation-increases-national-park-officials-seek-to-protect-resources-news/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/as-visitation-increases-national-park-officials-seek-to-protect-resources-news/ As visitation increases on the heels of the relatively recent creation of the newest national park in the United States, National Park Service employees and the general public at large are aware of the need for expansion or updating. infrastructure in the future. Eve West, chief of interpretation, visitor services and cultural resources for New […]]]>

As visitation increases on the heels of the relatively recent creation of the newest national park in the United States, National Park Service employees and the general public at large are aware of the need for expansion or updating. infrastructure in the future.

Eve West, chief of interpretation, visitor services and cultural resources for New River Gorge National Park and Preserve, Bluestone National Scenic River and Gauley River National Recreation Area, said officials from the park are considering several years.

Signed into law in 2020, the Great American Outdoors Act established the National Parks and Public Land Legacy Restoration Fund to address the deferred maintenance backlog of five federal agencies and provided full permanent funding to the Land and Water Conservation Fund.

West says it’s still “too early” to definitively discuss projects that will eventually help strengthen the infrastructure of local NPS entities.

“There were parks that submitted projects quite early that were funded for 23-24, but we weren’t one of those parks because we came in a bit later, so it’s really too early. to talk about it,” she said.

“With any type of funding process, the way we do things always takes us about three years and anyway,” West continued. “There are different ways to fund projects.

This includes cycle funding and project management information system funding.

According to West, specific projects always of major interest in prioritization are looking to wastewater and other projects that help protect park resources. Anything involving resource protection, as well as visitor safety, “is always our number one priority.”

According to information provided by West, the Great American Outdoors Act has provided the USDA Forest Service with new opportunities to provide benefits to the American public through major investments in recreational infrastructure, access to public lands and land and water conservation. These investments will enrich communities by contributing to economic growth and job creation in rural America.

GAOA is providing permanent full funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) which will advance the administration’s 30×30 conservation goals and establish a new National Parks and Public Lands Legacy Restoration Fund ( LRF) to address the deferred maintenance backlog for the Department of Agriculture and Department of Home Affairs during fiscal years 2021-25.

A recent statutorily funded project was the Grandview Hearth and Shelter Restoration Project. The NPS dedicated $14.1 million from the FY21 LRF program to meet deferred maintenance needs in 33 states and 59 small and medium-sized parks. Grandview was one of the first smaller projects, West said, because New River was one of the first parks to receive law funding for a national park project.

This particular project, executed by the NPS Maintenance Action Team (MAT), preserved and maintained 30 of the original historic fire pits located in five different shelters and restored a picnic area to usable condition. It included tasks such as repointing, new firebricks, replacing cooking surfaces and repairing stones. Repairs to the frame and timber elements of the shelters have been completed, CCC road culverts and other masonry elements around the Grandview site have been repaired to improve the visitor experience.

According to West, MAT is a group of trained and experienced NPS masons and maintainers from the Historic Preservation Training Center and NRGNPP who have been brought together to carry out the “much needed preservation maintenance work that has long been reported on this site. “This GAOA MAT and future ones are designed to provide young and veterans the opportunity to work with and train in the skills associated with the upkeep and maintenance of NPS sites. This could include trades such as carpentry, masonry, plumbing, or even HVAC work.

West says a pending project — which was in the works before the national park was designated — will also make a big difference.

The planned expansion of the Canyon Rim Visitor Center in Lansing will be a boost, she said. “It will be a wonderful addition, and the timing just happens to be perfect.” New exhibits are expected to be added by early 2023, two years after the park was redesignated.

New signage around the park will also continue to be installed. The process of hiring seasonal staff is also underway.

“The park is looking at long-term plans to (strengthen) anything that is one of our heavily used areas,” West said. One aspect of the legislation passed under the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021 expanded the park’s boundaries by about 100 acres (non-consecutive), West said. “They did this in hopes of an increase in visitation which would lead to the need for expansion in certain areas.”

The New River Gorge National River was designated a national park in December 2020. Authorities have cited an increase in visitation since then.

According to a breakdown of park numbers from WV Public Broadcasting via the NPS, NRGNPP saw record visitor numbers in 2021. Nearly 1.7 million people (1,682,720 to be exact) visited the park in the year. last, an increase of more than 600,000 from 2020. According to recent figures revealed by the NPS, 60 million more people visited national parks in 2021 than in 2020.

Many national parks have seen a drop in visitor numbers in 2020 due to coronavirus-related closures.

“It is wonderful to see so many Americans continue to find comfort and inspiration in these incredible places in the second year of the pandemic,” National Park Service Director Chuck Sams said in a press release. .

The New River Gorge Nuclear Generating Station ranks 47th on the National Park Service’s list of most visited sites. With 70,000 acres in Fayette, Raleigh and Summers counties, it is the newest national park in the system.

For an in-depth look at visitation statistics, visit https://www.nps.gov/subjects/socialscience/highlights.htm. For national summaries and individual park figures, visit https://irma.nps.gov/STATS/

Becky Sullivan, executive director of the Fayette County/New River Gorge CVB Chamber of Commerce, said the number of visits to the CVB in 2021 was similar to 2019.

“In 2021, people were ready to get out and explore the new national park, so we had a lot more trips from that year on,” she said.

The CVB sees an increase in visitor guide requests. Volunteers have remained stable and the Chamber/CVB will soon add a full-time employee to serve as a reception center and event coordinator.

Looking down the road as visitation to the area is expected to increase, Sullivan said: “I think with the expected increase in tourism this year, I think we’re ready. But there are a lot of changes coming, a lot of new infrastructure coming. »

“As far as our increased numbers that we had last year, I think we’ve done a pretty good job of spreading the footprint,” West said. “We encouraged visitors to plan like a ranger, be sure to plan ahead and make sure you know where the most popular areas are.”

Areas of interest such as Long Point and Endless Wall are popular, but there are plenty of other options in the area, West said. “If you go and the parking lot is full, don’t go. Come back later.

“We have Grandview – a variety of trails there that are wonderful trails, which people go on less often. These are wonderful regions, they are simply not very well known.

“We have what we call the Wild and the Gentle, we have the Wild North and the Gentle South. The south end of the park has tended in the past to have fewer visitors, not because they aren’t beautiful areas, beautiful Grandview, historic Hinton – all of these areas are wonderful places where to go. It’s just that people didn’t know them as much.

Certain areas of the park, such as the trails, are obviously busier than other areas, but “I think in terms of (being) in good enough condition to not be impacted by people trampling the vegetation, and things like that. Highly used trails will obviously have more impact on those trails than less used trails. But, overall, yes, the trails are in good condition.

In the coming year, park staff will continue to adapt to more activity and look to when other infrastructure projects can begin.

“We’re going to try new things with bookings and things for some of our programs,” West said. “We’re looking to plan our programming well in advance, whereas before we were able to react to things more quickly. With more visits and interest, we are planning things well in advance. »

“I anticipate that we may have increased the number of visits from our foreign visitors,” she added, mentioning the visit of a group of travel writers to the region in 2021 which helped raise awareness of the new National Park. “Traditionally, when (foreign visitors) come to the United States, they like to go to national parks. Now that we have this national park, I envision that we could also attract more foreign visitors.

West said she appreciates everyone’s hard work as the adjustment period continues.

“Everyone has been very responsive in helping us … make the park safer for visitors,” she said. This includes West Virginia tourism, local businesses and outfitters and others. “We’re all trying to take care of this place for the good of all of us.”

To learn more about the park, visit https://www.nps.gov/neri/index.htm

— Email skeenan@register-herald.com; follow on Twitter @gb_scribe

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Filling empty AI resource fund could help local flood work / Public News Service https://preservethenati.org/filling-empty-ai-resource-fund-could-help-local-flood-work-public-news-service/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 23:03:07 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/filling-empty-ai-resource-fund-could-help-local-flood-work-public-news-service/ A little-known Iowa program continues to pave the way for local coordination of flood prevention strategies, and proponents of the initiative point to an opportunity this year to increase funding. Watershed Management Authorities (WMAs) have been around for more than a decade, and proponents of the program hope lawmakers don’t rule out a funding provision […]]]>

A little-known Iowa program continues to pave the way for local coordination of flood prevention strategies, and proponents of the initiative point to an opportunity this year to increase funding.

Watershed Management Authorities (WMAs) have been around for more than a decade, and proponents of the program hope lawmakers don’t rule out a funding provision tied to the current Republican tax plan in the state Senate.

WMAs bring together cities, counties, and soil and water conservation districts to better manage flooding and other issues in a watershed.

Kate Hansen, policy associate at the Center for Rural Affairs, said these coalitions could do so much more with consistent support from the state.

“Agricultural practices or educational programs for watershed planning, staffing, there’s so much potential here,” Hansen said. “We would really like that element to stay in place.”

Income tax changes, which advocates for low-income Iowans oppose, are central to the Senate plan. He also calls for moving forward with a sales tax hike approved by voters several years ago for a natural resources trust fund. While it depends on a final formula, supporters hope there will be money for the WMAs, so they don’t have to rely primarily on competitive grants and fundraising.

Cara Morgan, coordinator of the East and West Nishnabotna watershed coalitions, formed in 2017 in southwestern Iowa, said the local voices brought together through the program allowed them to plan and explore solutions to a range of flooding problems.

“We really felt like we accomplished a lot,” Morgan said. “But we also have a lot to do and it shows in our watershed plan.”

Morgan pointed out that governments and local agencies offer volunteers to be their representatives in WMAs. But there is often turnover, and a dedicated coordinator always brings everything together. She noted that it is difficult to fund such positions without state support.

“A lot of grants are meant to fund specific projects, but not fund people to help or lead those projects,” Morgan pointed out.

Disclosure: The Center for Rural Affairs contributes to our fund for reporting on Policy and Budget Priorities, Environment, Hunger/Food/Nutrition, and Rural/Agriculture. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.

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UW-Stevens Point to Host Natural Resources Lecture Series https://preservethenati.org/uw-stevens-point-to-host-natural-resources-lecture-series-2/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 22:15:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/uw-stevens-point-to-host-natural-resources-lecture-series-2/ STEVENS POINT — The University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources will address “History, Successes, and Challenges in Natural Resource Decision-Making” with a series of seven presentations beginning Feb. 16. The Spring 2022 Seminar Series is sponsored by the Wisconsin Center for Wildlife and CNR at UW-Stevens Point. It will be held throughout the […]]]>

STEVENS POINT — The University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources will address “History, Successes, and Challenges in Natural Resource Decision-Making” with a series of seven presentations beginning Feb. 16.

The Spring 2022 Seminar Series is sponsored by the Wisconsin Center for Wildlife and CNR at UW-Stevens Point. It will be held throughout the semester, with each presentation taking place from 4-5 p.m. select Wednesdays in room 170 of the Trainer Natural Resources building. Each will also be streamed live on CNR’s YouTube channel.

This seminar series highlights the roles of the legislature, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Wisconsin Conservation Congress, tribal government, non-governmental organizations, and citizens in making decisions affecting our natural resources in Wisconsin.

To learn more, visit www.uwsp.edu/cnr/WCW/Pages/2022-Seminar-Series.aspx.

The series includes:

  • February 16 – “How do we get back to the center?” Depolarizing talk on major wildlife issues,” Scott Walter, Kickapoo Valley Preserve Executive Director.
  • March 2 – “Wisconsin Water Quality Policy: How the Legislature Can Lead,” Katrina Shankland, State Representative, Wisconsin 71st Assembly District
  • March 16 – “Wisconsin Conservation Congress: Facilitating Public Participation,” Tony Blattler, Wisconsin Conservation Congress President
  • March 30 – “Citizen Involvement in Wisconsin Natural Resource Decision-Making,” Christine Thomas, Dean Emeritus and Professor Emeritus
  • April 6 – “The DNR’s Mission and What (Who) It Takes to Accomplish It,” Dan Baumann, Secretariat Director, West Central Unit, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
  • April 20 – Title to be determined, Greg Kazmierski, President, Natural Resources Council
  • April 27 – TBA Title, Jon Greendeer, Former President, Ho-Chunk Nation

Source: UW-Stevens Point

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Surveys and inventories at El Dorado completed ahead of Historic Preservation Plan work https://preservethenati.org/surveys-and-inventories-at-el-dorado-completed-ahead-of-historic-preservation-plan-work/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 09:35:23 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/surveys-and-inventories-at-el-dorado-completed-ahead-of-historic-preservation-plan-work/ EL DORADO – Contractors hired by the El Dorado Historic District Commission and the City of El Dorado are completing field work in three local neighborhoods. Eligibility determination/cultural resource surveys for Country Club Colony, Retta Brown and Mellor Park, Forest Lawn/Eastridge and a small section of the McKinney Subdivision, including some non-plateau properties, will help […]]]>

EL DORADO – Contractors hired by the El Dorado Historic District Commission and the City of El Dorado are completing field work in three local neighborhoods.

Eligibility determination/cultural resource surveys for Country Club Colony, Retta Brown and Mellor Park, Forest Lawn/Eastridge and a small section of the McKinney Subdivision, including some non-plateau properties, will help determine if neighborhoods will be eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places, either as districts or with individually listed properties.

The projects are part of an overall effort to achieve a citywide historic preservation plan that was drafted in 2020.

Neighborhoods and Surveys were recommended as priority projects in the plan which, along with Surveys, are funded by a total of approximately $100,000 in certified local government grants that have been awarded to the city by the Historic Preservation Program of Arkansas.

To help draft the plan, the City of El Dorado donated an additional $10,000 from the El Dorado Works Tax, the 1% municipal sales tax initiative used for economic development, municipal infrastructure and projects. of quality of life.

On Thursday, Elizabeth Eggleston, executive director of the Historic District Commission, reported that fieldwork was complete for the investigations.

In early 2021 Terracon Consultant Services, Inc. – headquartered in Kansas – launched an eligibility determination survey of 326 properties in the Mellor Park area, the Forest Lawn/Eastridge subdivision and a small section of the subdivision. McKinney, including some unplated properties.

A team from Terracon’s offices in Austin, Texas is working on the project.

Eggleston said Thursday that Terracon has completed fieldwork and is compiling site plans, Arkansas Architectural Resource forms and photographs to send to the El Dorado Historic District Commission and Historic Preservation Program. of Arkansas for review.

She stated that Cox | McLain-Stantec Inc., based in Austin, Texas, had reached a similar phase in its investigations of the Country Club Colony and Retta Brown neighborhoods.

Cox|McLain-Stantec architectural historians conducted site visits in January, inspecting a total of 110 properties and completing fieldwork well before the end of the month.

Eggleston said Thursday that, like Terracon, Cox | McLain-Stantec has collected photographs and site plans – all of which include information on the architectural style, exterior materials and any alterations.

She also said that Cox | McLain-Stantec was also completing the first 10 architectural resource forms, which are due by Tuesday.

“So they’re on schedule with their work,” Eggleston said, adding that all investigation documentation is due to the Historic District Commission and the state Historic Preservation Program by the end of April. .

If the surveys receive the stamp of approval from these two entities, the nomination forms will be submitted to the State Review Board for review in the National and State Registers of Historic Places.

If the properties are eligible to be listed on the National Registry, the state review board will then make a recommendation to the National Park Service, the federal agency that administers the National Registry.

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Surveys and inventories at El Dorado completed ahead of Historic Preservation Plan work https://preservethenati.org/surveys-and-inventories-at-el-dorado-completed-ahead-of-historic-preservation-plan-work-2/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 09:10:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/surveys-and-inventories-at-el-dorado-completed-ahead-of-historic-preservation-plan-work-2/ EL DORADO – Contractors hired by the El Dorado Historic District Commission and the City of El Dorado are completing field work in three local neighborhoods. Eligibility determination/cultural resource surveys for Country Club Colony, Retta Brown and Mellor Park, Forest Lawn/Eastridge and a small section of the McKinney Subdivision, including some non-plateau properties, will help […]]]>

EL DORADO – Contractors hired by the El Dorado Historic District Commission and the City of El Dorado are completing field work in three local neighborhoods.

Eligibility determination/cultural resource surveys for Country Club Colony, Retta Brown and Mellor Park, Forest Lawn/Eastridge and a small section of the McKinney Subdivision, including some non-plateau properties, will help determine if neighborhoods will be eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places, either as districts or with individually listed properties.

The projects are part of an overall effort to achieve a citywide historic preservation plan that was drafted in 2020.

Neighborhoods and Surveys were recommended as priority projects in the plan which, along with Surveys, are funded by a total of approximately $100,000 in certified local government grants that have been awarded to the city by the Historic Preservation Program of Arkansas.

To help draft the plan, the City of El Dorado donated an additional $10,000 from the El Dorado Works Tax, the 1% municipal sales tax initiative used for economic development, municipal infrastructure and projects. of quality of life.

On Thursday, Elizabeth Eggleston, executive director of the Historic District Commission, reported that fieldwork was complete for the investigations.

In early 2021 Terracon Consultant Services, Inc. – headquartered in Kansas – launched an eligibility determination survey of 326 properties in the Mellor Park area, the Forest Lawn/Eastridge subdivision and a small section of the subdivision. McKinney, including some unplated properties.

A team from Terracon’s offices in Austin, Texas is working on the project.

Eggleston said Thursday that Terracon has completed fieldwork and is compiling site plans, Arkansas Architectural Resource forms and photographs to send to the El Dorado Historic District Commission and Historic Preservation Program. of Arkansas for review.

She stated that Cox | Austin, Texas-based McLain-Stantec Inc. had reached a similar phase in its investigations of the Country Club Colony and Retta Brown neighborhoods.

Cox|McLain-Stantec architectural historians conducted site visits in January, inspecting a total of 110 properties and completing fieldwork well before the end of the month.

Eggleston said Thursday that, like Terracon, Cox | McLain-Stantec has collected photographs and site plans – all of which include information on the architectural style, exterior materials and any alterations.

She also said that Cox | McLain-Stantec was also completing the first 10 architectural resource forms, which are due by Tuesday.

“So they’re on schedule with their work,” Eggleston said, adding that all investigation documentation is due to the Historic District Commission and the state Historic Preservation Program by the end of April. .

If the surveys receive the stamp of approval from these two entities, the nomination forms will be submitted to the State Review Board for review in the National and State Registers of Historic Places.

If the properties are eligible to be listed on the National Registry, the state review board will then make a recommendation to the National Park Service, the federal agency that administers the National Registry.

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Surveys and inventories at El Dorado completed ahead of Historic Preservation Plan work https://preservethenati.org/surveys-and-inventories-at-el-dorado-completed-ahead-of-historic-preservation-plan-work-3/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 09:10:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/surveys-and-inventories-at-el-dorado-completed-ahead-of-historic-preservation-plan-work-3/ EL DORADO – Contractors hired by the El Dorado Historic District Commission and the City of El Dorado are completing field work in three local neighborhoods. Eligibility determination/cultural resource surveys for Country Club Colony, Retta Brown and Mellor Park, Forest Lawn/Eastridge and a small section of the McKinney Subdivision, including some non-plateau properties, will help […]]]>

EL DORADO – Contractors hired by the El Dorado Historic District Commission and the City of El Dorado are completing field work in three local neighborhoods.

Eligibility determination/cultural resource surveys for Country Club Colony, Retta Brown and Mellor Park, Forest Lawn/Eastridge and a small section of the McKinney Subdivision, including some non-plateau properties, will help determine if neighborhoods will be eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places, either as districts or with individually listed properties.

The projects are part of an overall effort to achieve a citywide historic preservation plan that was drafted in 2020.

Neighborhoods and Surveys were recommended as priority projects in the plan which, along with Surveys, are funded by a total of approximately $100,000 in certified local government grants that have been awarded to the city by the Historic Preservation Program of Arkansas.

To help draft the plan, the City of El Dorado donated an additional $10,000 from the El Dorado Works Tax, the 1% municipal sales tax initiative used for economic development, municipal infrastructure and projects. of quality of life.

On Thursday, Elizabeth Eggleston, executive director of the Historic District Commission, reported that fieldwork was complete for the investigations.

In early 2021 Terracon Consultant Services, Inc. – headquartered in Kansas – launched an eligibility determination survey of 326 properties in the Mellor Park area, the Forest Lawn/Eastridge subdivision and a small section of the subdivision. McKinney, including some unplated properties.

A team from Terracon’s offices in Austin, Texas is working on the project.

Eggleston said Thursday that Terracon has completed fieldwork and is compiling site plans, Arkansas Architectural Resource forms and photographs to send to the El Dorado Historic District Commission and Historic Preservation Program. of Arkansas for review.

She stated that Cox | McLain-Stantec Inc., based in Austin, Texas, had reached a similar phase in its investigations of the Country Club Colony and Retta Brown neighborhoods.

Cox|McLain-Stantec architectural historians conducted site visits in January, inspecting a total of 110 properties and completing fieldwork well before the end of the month.

Eggleston said Thursday that, like Terracon, Cox | McLain-Stantec has collected photographs and site plans – all of which include information on the architectural style, exterior materials and any alterations.

She also said that Cox | McLain-Stantec was also completing the first 10 architectural resource forms, which are due by Tuesday.

“So they’re on schedule with their work,” Eggleston said, adding that all investigation documentation is due to the Historic District Commission and the state Historic Preservation Program by the end of April. .

If the surveys receive the stamp of approval from these two entities, the nomination forms will be submitted to the State Review Board for review in the National and State Registers of Historic Places.

If the properties are eligible to be listed on the National Registry, the state review board will then make a recommendation to the National Park Service, the federal agency that administers the National Registry.

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UW-Stevens Point to Host Natural Resources Lecture Series https://preservethenati.org/uw-stevens-point-to-host-natural-resources-lecture-series/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 11:59:11 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/uw-stevens-point-to-host-natural-resources-lecture-series/ Subway wire staff The College of Natural Resources (CNR) at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point is hosting a series of lectures beginning Feb. 16. The spring seminar is titled “History, Successes and Challenges in Natural Resource Decision-Making” and involves multiple speakers through April. The series is sponsored by the Wisconsin Center for Wildlife and CNR […]]]>

Subway wire staff

The College of Natural Resources (CNR) at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point is hosting a series of lectures beginning Feb. 16.

The spring seminar is titled “History, Successes and Challenges in Natural Resource Decision-Making” and involves multiple speakers through April.

The series is sponsored by the Wisconsin Center for Wildlife and CNR at UW-Stevens Point. Each presentation takes place from 4-5 p.m. in room 170 of the Trainer Natural Resources Building.

Each will also be streamed live on CNR’s YouTube channel.

This seminar series highlights the roles of the legislature, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Wisconsin Conservation Congress, tribal government, non-governmental organizations, and citizens in making decisions affecting our natural resources in Wisconsin.

The series includes:

  • February 16 – “How can we get back to the center? Depolarizing talk on major wildlife issues,” Scott Walter, Kickapoo Valley Preserve Executive Director.
  • March 2 – “Water Quality Policy in Wisconsin: How the Legislature Can Lead,” State Rep. Katrina Shankland, WI 71st Assembly District
  • March 16 – “The Wisconsin Conservation Congress: Facilitating Public Participation”, Tony Blattler, president of the Wisconsin Conservation Congress
  • March 30 – “Citizen Involvement in Wisconsin Natural Resource Decision-Making,” Christine Thomas, Dean Emeritus and Professor Emeritus
  • April 6 – “The DNR Mission and What (Who) It Takes to Complete It,” Dan Baumann, Secretary Director, West Central Unit, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
  • April 20 – Title TBD, Greg Kazmierski, Chair, Natural Resources Council
  • April 27 – TBA Title, Jon Greendeer, Former President, Ho-Chunk Nation
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Historic Preservation Awards Salute Oregon Structures, Some Saved From Wrecking Ball https://preservethenati.org/historic-preservation-awards-salute-oregon-structures-some-saved-from-wrecking-ball/ Fri, 24 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/historic-preservation-awards-salute-oregon-structures-some-saved-from-wrecking-ball/ People who revitalize historic buildings are honored by the preservation organization Restore Oregon for the impact of their improvements on their communities. Beneficiaries of the coveted 2021 DeMuro Award for Excellence in Historic Preservation demonstrated how restoring and updating architectural and cultural sites can create affordable housing, incubate new businesses, and fight climate change through […]]]>

People who revitalize historic buildings are honored by the preservation organization Restore Oregon for the impact of their improvements on their communities.

Beneficiaries of the coveted 2021 DeMuro Award for Excellence in Historic Preservation demonstrated how restoring and updating architectural and cultural sites can create affordable housing, incubate new businesses, and fight climate change through reuse, says Nicole Possert, executive director of Restore Oregon.

The 11 teams of architects, engineers, designers, contractors, developers, landowners, community leaders and volunteers selected for the award have restored viability to commercial buildings as well as homes, a pioneer doctor closed to a treehouse type retreat by the sea.

Saving Oregon’s Spectacular Homes from the Wrecking Ball: Could Portland’s Alcoa Home Be Saved or Salvaged?

Here are the 2021 DeMuro Award winners selected for their extraordinary design, craftsmanship, creative problem solving and community impact:

For a decade, a group of volunteers raised funds and planned the preservation and rehabilitation of the former home of the community’s first physician, Charles Caples.

The deterioration, on two levels, Neoclassical farmhouse was raised from the ground and a new stable concrete foundation was installed. The porch has been rebuilt, the lead paint removed and the dry rot eliminated.

The property, which includes renovated stand buildings, gardens and a gazebo, overlooks the Columbia River and is open to the public as a Caples House Museum and Knapp Social Center.

The project team included Oregon State Society Daughters of the American Revolution, BK Engineers, Arciform, City of St. Helens, Columbia County Planning & Building Department, Columbia County Public Works, Fresh Paint, Armac, OXBO Mega Transport, Clackamas Electric and EC Stonework & Masonry

The two floors commercial buildinglisted on the National Register of Historic Places, originally housed a confectionery followed by a variety of restaurants, including the Golden Mushroom and Toadstool Lounge in the 1970s. Then it sat empty for years.

The renovated structure is now the city’s premier food hall, Fork Forty, on the ground floor with five restored apartments on the second floor and entertainment businesses in the basement.

The project team included FXG Construction, Design-Build by FXG, City of Salem, Ronald James Ped Architect, Gralund Engineering and Pallay Apartments

The profitable renovation of the National register-the listed building honored historic character while adding affordable housing for 173 veterans and low-income residents.

The six-story downtown structure is now the tallest earthquake-resistant reinforced masonry building in the city.

The project team included SERA Architects, Central City ConcernKlosh Group, Humber Design Group, Geodesign, KPFF, Global Transportation Engineering, Colas, Allegion, RDH Building Sciences, Hunter-Davisson, HK Electrical Engineers, Patriot Fire Protection, Imagine Energy, Piper Mechanical, Hennebery Eddy Architects, Meritus Consulting, A+ Menuiserie Finishing, Allied Window, American Direct, Artic Sheet Metal, Civic Construction, Kone, MCG Commercial, Merit Electric, Mt. Hood Steel & Wood, Paulson’s Floor Covering, Pella Windows & Doors, Pioneer Waterproofing Co., Renko NW, Schonert & Associates, Whitaker Ellis, Versatile Wood Products, VPI Quality Windows, McDonald & Wetle, Safeguard Industries and Sign Wizards

The stucco and brick building, originally called the Pallay Apartmentsis one of the first examples of “apartment buildings”, built for the population boom caused by the city’s biggest promotional campaign, the Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition of 1905.

The renovated three-story structure, designed around a central courtyard in the Buckman neighborhood, provides affordable and safe housing for women impacted by homelessness or other trauma.

Historically Sensitive Updates to the Building registered in the national register included reconfiguring community gathering areas and increasing ADA accessibility as well as a full seismic upgrade.

The original elements have been restored such as the main staircase, the Murphy bed alcoves and the cast iron radiators.

Project team included Jones Architecture, REACH Community DevelopmentFrœlich Engineers, LMC construction, Shapiro Didway’s Landscape ArchitectureMeritus Property Group, Paulson’s Floor Coverings, Imperial Cabinets and Millwork, Andersen Mechanical, Jet Industries and Commercial Plumbing Consulting & Design

Operating continuously for 110 years as a car dealership and repair shop, the four-story building is the last remnant of Automatic line on West Burnside Street.

A 1952 remodel added squares of green structural glass to modernize the facade. Historians believe it to be the largest Vitrolite glass installation in Oregon and possibly the United States.

The project team included Hennebery Eddy Architects, Fisher Family, kpff, R&H Construction, Lango Hanson Landscape Architects, Interface Engineering and the City of Portland

The original sanctuary of Former Church of the Madeleine in the Alameda-Irvington neighborhood was brought up to building code while preserving and restoring its historic character.

Structural upgrades and modern systems, such as high-efficiency heating and air conditioning, were concealed in the space out used for events, from weddings to recitals.

The original woodwork and stained glass have been restored. The 1930s accent wall, which had been repainted, has been recreated down to the gold leaf details.

The project team included Carleton Hart Architecture, The Madeleine Parish, TM Rippey Consulting Engineers, Humber Design Group, H&A Construction, House of George and MFIA

Carlton’s first auto repair garage was used by a logging company and a glove manufacturing company as well as a winery production plant. Now the revamped office space showcases the heavy wood arch trusses and open floor plan.

The renovation of the unreinforced masonry building has inspired other downtown improvements and generated new economic opportunities for the area, according to Restore Oregon.

The project team included Schommer & Sons Construction, Waterleaf Architects, Applied Insights Oregon, WDY Structural-Civil Engineers, PAE Consulting Engineers, Schommer & Sons Construction, Luma Lighting Design, Concrete Sawing Company, River City Rebar, Larusso Concrete, DB Steel , Anderson Roofing , Total Mechanical, Farnham Electric, Viking Fire, The Harver Company, Schonert & Associates, TT&L Sheet Metal, Door Solutions, Chown Hardware, Artek, Bratton Masonry, Culver Glass, Aspen Creek, Isolation Contractors, Toughstuff Industrial Floors, Benchmark Contracting, Sierra Pacific, BASCO, Carson Oil, Metro Overhead Door, OCD Automation, Paulson’s Commercial Flooring, Schiller & Vroman, Cache Valley Electric and Sign Wizards

Premier Gear’s disjointed machinery parts factory – a handful of structures spread across a block in Slabtown – has been transformed into a unified office space.

Original features of the solid wood construction include sawtooth skylights, hoists, jibs and crane tracks. A cohesive exterior has been created with new entrances and windows as well as an added second level and a large covered terrace.

The project team included LRS Architects, Sturgeon Development Partners, Catena Consulting Engineers, Lorentz Bruun Construction, Shapiro|Didway, American Heating Inc., Christenson Electric, Rayborn’s Plumbing Inc., Blackstone Fire Protection, Humber Design Group and GRI

Named after Mary Noble, one of Portland’s first female developers, the two-story building on a corner of the Foster-Powell neighborhood has been neglected for more than 90 years.

The facade has been restored, building systems have been improved and interior spaces refreshed now host small emerging businesses that reflect the diversity of the neighborhood.

Project team included EMA architectureFor Mrs. Noble, Grummel Engineering and Joseph Hughes Construction

The former Post Office Employees’ Savings Bank, with its undulating laminated beams and contrasting stained glass windows, is an excellent example of a well-restored mid-century modern bank.

In 2000, the desperate, white-painted mass of Buckman’s neighborhood was easy to ignore. Multnomah County used it as an office for its corrections department. Barbed wire over old high-pressure fences and other troublesome barriers concealed the faded coolness factor of the site.

In 2018, new owners, including Jenelle Isaacson, founder of Living room real estatestepped in and spent over a year executing a thoughtful rehabilitation of the International Style building. Read more

Project team included SUM Design Studio + Architecture, Deform NW, Design S. BairdMedium LA, Meritus Property Group, Plum Painting, Viking Electric, Arjae, Classique Floors + Tile, Planes of Reference, Ambient Automation, Kruse, Ground Up Services, Klutch, Budget Blinds, ACT Window Films, Speedy Glass, Oregon Concepts, The Bamboo Man, AZ Tech and Fieldwork

A seaside structure, similar to a tree house, hovering above the forest floor on several poles, had been degraded by water intrusion and time.

The original woodwork of the timber-framed retreat has been restored and insulation has been added without disturbing the existing proportions or sight lines.

Project team included Beebe Skidmore Architects and Hoffman Taylor Construction

— Janet Eastman | 503-294-4072

jeastman@oregonian.com | @janeteastman

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City Historic Preservation Order Upheld by Texas Supreme Court | Immovable https://preservethenati.org/city-historic-preservation-order-upheld-by-texas-supreme-court-immovable/ Wed, 09 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/city-historic-preservation-order-upheld-by-texas-supreme-court-immovable/ The future of the architectural character of much of the Heights neighborhood had been in the balance for five months. Late last week, historic preservation supporters in the local community and throughout Houston breathed a collective sigh of relief. The Texas Supreme Court issued an opinion June 4 that upheld two lower court rulings in […]]]>

The future of the architectural character of much of the Heights neighborhood had been in the balance for five months.

Late last week, historic preservation supporters in the local community and throughout Houston breathed a collective sigh of relief.

The Texas Supreme Court issued an opinion June 4 that upheld two lower court rulings in favor of the city and its Historic Preservation Ordinance, which governs building requirements in 19 Houston neighborhoods that have been designated as historic , including nine subdivisions in the Greater Heights. The owners of Two Heights had challenged the legality of the 26-year-old ordinance, saying it constituted zoning, which is a community planning tool that violates the city charter.

Oral arguments were made in court on January 5.

“I am very pleased to hear that the Supreme Court of Texas has upheld the Historic Preservation Ordinance,” said Sharon Dearman, president of the Houston Heights Association, whose organization serves area residents and businesses. . “The history of our community must continue to be preserved.”

the opinion issued by the highest court in the state, written by Judge J. Brett Busby, said the city’s historic preservation bylaws do not violate the city’s charter because they are not land use bylaws and do not fall under the usual definition of the city. zoning, because they only apply to a small number. of Houston homeowners and because different historic districts have different regulations. Busby also wrote that the city’s ordinance is considered a zoning mechanism under Chapter 211 of the Texas Property Code, but the city had met all requirements set out in the code by state lawmakers.

The court too issued a concurring opinion, written by Judge Jane N. Bland, who came to the same legal conclusion but with different reasoning. Bland wrote that the city’s historic preservation ordinance outlines land use regulations, adding that it “stands perilously close to the traditional zoning line.”

Matthew Festa, a professor at South Texas College of Law Houston who represented the two Heights landlords who filed the lawsuit, Paul Luccia and Kathleen Powell, said they had a mixed reaction to the court’s opinion.

“Of course, my clients are disappointed that the decision has not gone our way, and we are concerned that parts of the decision will leave private property rights less protected than they should be under the law. Texas,” Festa said. “However, the decision provides important clarifications. In some ways, it is helpful to ensure that local governments must respect the limits of state laws and city charters, especially with respect to private property rights.

Sara Bronin, a Houston native and University of Connecticut law professor who wrote an amicus brief on behalf of the city, called the court’s opinion a “total win for the city” because it upheld the legality of the historic preservation ordinance on both a municipal and national level.

RELATED: City Preservation Ordinance Faces Legal Challenge

The ordinance, which was first passed in 1995 and strengthened with enforcement mechanisms in 2010, gives property owners the ability to apply to have their neighborhoods designated as historic. Subsequently, in these historic districts, there are protections for monuments and archaeological sites and owners must apply for “certificates of adequacy” for any building renovation that goes beyond ordinary maintenance and repair.

Minnette Boesel is president of the Houston Archaeological and Historical Commission, a voluntary organization whose board members are appointed by the mayor and city council. The commission processes applications for certificates of adequacy and makes recommendations to city council regarding the designation of historic buildings and districts.

Boesel said the commission was “very pleased” to hear the opinion of the Texas Supreme Court, which protects historic preservation guidelines that apply to about 7,500 structures in Houston, including about 2,000 in neighborhoods. Historic Heights East, Heights South and Heights West.

“Our purpose as a commission is fundamentally to help preserve and retain the quality, character and fabric of Houston’s tangible history,” she said. “Therefore, it adds economic value and promotes our city. … It’s also sustainable, because you’re maintaining and conserving the materials inside the structure.

David Bush, executive director of Preservation Houston, said he was relieved the state high court upheld rulings from a Harris County court in 2017 and a state appeals court in 2019 He said he was concerned that part of the city’s historic preservation ordinance, or the entire ordinance, would be overturned.

Lucia and Powell’s lawsuit was originally filed in 2014.

“It’s good not to have this over our heads,” Bush said.

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