listed national – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ Sun, 27 Mar 2022 04:41:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://preservethenati.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/nati.png listed national – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ 32 32 Morris County Applications Available for Historic Preservation Funds – Morris County, NJ https://preservethenati.org/morris-county-applications-available-for-historic-preservation-funds-morris-county-nj/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 16:58:20 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/morris-county-applications-available-for-historic-preservation-funds-morris-county-nj/ Posted on January 13, 2022 Morris County Applications Available for Historic Preservation Funds The Morris County Historic Preservation Trust Fund is now accepting grant applications for 2022 funding. The grassroots program began in 2003, after voters overwhelmingly approved the allocation of taxpayer dollars to preserving Morris County’s rich history. In 2021, the Morris County Board […]]]>

Posted on January 13, 2022

Morris County Applications Available for Historic Preservation Funds

The Morris County Historic Preservation Trust Fund is now accepting grant applications for 2022 funding.

The grassroots program began in 2003, after voters overwhelmingly approved the allocation of taxpayer dollars to preserving Morris County’s rich history. In 2021, the Morris County Board of Commissioners unanimously approved more than $43 million to help preserve, restore, or protect 117 historic sites in 34 cities.

be eligible for a matching grant, a historic resource must be listed or certified eligible for listing on the state register or national register of historic places. Eligible applicants are municipalities, qualified nonprofits, and the county.

Details for obtaining and submitting applications can be found at app webpage.

The Morris County Planning and Preservation Office will organize a workshop to explain the application process on Wednesday, January 26, 2022, 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. through Webex:

https://morriscountynj.webex.com/meet/rchang

Please register to attend the workshop via email at [email protected] or by phone at (973) 829-8138. This will be an opportunity to ask questions about the program and the suitability of projects such as:

  • Is my project eligible?
  • What types of projects have been funded in the past?
  • Can cemeteries apply?
  • Are construction documents required for construction projects?
  • What if my project is not currently listed on the National and New Jersey registries?

Please note, the historic preservation program is again waiving the paper submission requirement for 2022 grant applications, except where preservation plans and/or drawings/specifications have not been previously reviewed by the County Consultant.

Below are some important links to additional information.The Tunis-Ellicks House – Harding Township.jpg

The deadline for applications is Friday, March 25, 2022

If you have any questions regarding the Historic Preservation Program, please contact Ray Chang, PP, Historic Preservation Program Coordinator, Morris County Office of Planning & Preservation, PO Box 900, Morristown, NJ 07963-0900. E-mail: [email protected]. Phone: 973-829-8138.

Photos: Chester Borough’s 1868 Rockefeller Center (top right) and the 1838 Tunis Ellicks House in Harding Township (bottom right), both of which received historic preservation grants approved in 2021.

]]>
Applications available for Historic Preservation Funds https://preservethenati.org/applications-available-for-historic-preservation-funds/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/applications-available-for-historic-preservation-funds/ The Morris County Historic Preservation Trust Fund is accepting grant applications for 2022 funding. The program began in 2003, after voters approved the allocation of taxpayer dollars to preserve Morris County’s history. In 2021, the Morris County Board of Commissioners unanimously approved more than $43 million to help preserve, restore, or protect 117 historic sites […]]]>

The Morris County Historic Preservation Trust Fund is accepting grant applications for 2022 funding.

The program began in 2003, after voters approved the allocation of taxpayer dollars to preserve Morris County’s history. In 2021, the Morris County Board of Commissioners unanimously approved more than $43 million to help preserve, restore, or protect 117 historic sites in 34 cities.

To be eligible for a matching grant, a historic resource must be listed or certified eligible for listing on the State Register or National Register of Historic Places. Eligible applicants are municipalities, qualified non-profit organizations and the county.

Details for obtaining and submitting applications can be found at app webpage.

The Morris County Planning and Preservation Office will host a workshop to explain the application process on Wednesday, January 26 from 7-8 p.m. via WebEx: https://morriscountynj.webex.com/meet/rchang.

To register for the workshop, email rchang@co.morris.nj.us or call 973-829-8138. During the workshop, it will be possible to ask questions about the program and the relevance of projects such as:

  • Is my project eligible?
  • What types of projects have been funded in the past?
  • Can cemeteries apply?
  • Are construction documents required for construction projects?
  • What if my project is not currently listed on the National and New Jersey registries?

The Historic Preservation Program waives the paper submission requirement for 2022 grant applications, except where preservation plans and/or drawings/specifications have not been previously reviewed by the county consultant.

Below are links to additional information:

The application deadline is Friday, March 25.

Questions regarding the Historic Preservation Program should be directed to Ray Chang, Historic Preservation Program Coordinator at the Morris County Office of Planning & Preservation, PO Box 900, Morristown, NJ 07963-0900, rchang@co.morris.nj.us . or 973-829-8138.

]]>
Historic Preservation Grants Available in Pennsylvania | Connect FM | Local news radio https://preservethenati.org/historic-preservation-grants-available-in-pennsylvania-connect-fm-local-news-radio/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/historic-preservation-grants-available-in-pennsylvania-connect-fm-local-news-radio/ Harrisburg, Pennsylvania – The Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission (PHMC) is now accepting applications from nonprofit organizations and local governments for the Keystone Historic Preservation Grant Program. Grants support projects that identify, preserve, promote, and protect Pennsylvania’s historical and archaeological resources for public benefit and community revitalization. Grants are funded by the Keystone Recreation, Park […]]]>

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania – The Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission (PHMC) is now accepting applications from nonprofit organizations and local governments for the Keystone Historic Preservation Grant Program.

Grants support projects that identify, preserve, promote, and protect Pennsylvania’s historical and archaeological resources for public benefit and community revitalization. Grants are funded by the Keystone Recreation, Park & ​​Conservation Fund. A total of $2.5 million has been set aside for this program, an increase from recent years due to the program’s continued popularity.

Two categories of grants—construction and planning—are available for historic resources in Pennsylvania that are listed or eligible to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Applicants can only apply for one type of grant.

Keystone Building Grants for Historic Preservation are available for rehabilitation, preservation, and restoration activities of historic resources that are publicly accessible and owned by nonprofit or local organizations. Building grants are available between $5,000 and $100,000 and require a 50/50 cash match. Potential capital project applicants should attend a PHMC webinar on Wednesday, January 19, 2022 at 11:00 a.m. To register, go to https://keystone_construction_grant_webinar_2021.eventbrite.com.

Keystone Historic Preservation Project grants are available for planning and development initiatives that enhance historic preservation in communities. Project grant applications may include municipal planning initiatives focused on historic resources or may be used to achieve building or project specific planning objectives. Project grants are available between $5,000 and $25,000 and require a 50/50 cash match. Prospective applicants for project grants can opt for the program on Thursday, January 20, 2022 at 11:00 a.m. To register, go to https://keystone_planning_grant_webinar_2021.eventbrite.com.

Recordings of the webinar series will be available on the PHMC PA Trails of History YouTube Channel.

Applications are due March 1, 2022. Grants will be awarded through a competitive selection process and are subject to the availability of funds.

Please note that all PHMC grant applications are now submitted on the Commonwealth Single Request for Assistance System. Visit the PHMC website for information on eligibility and grant guidelines.

The Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission is the official historical agency of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Learn more by visiting PHMC online or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, instagram Where LinkedIn.

]]>
Roe Jan Brewing wins State Historic Preservation Award | News https://preservethenati.org/roe-jan-brewing-wins-state-historic-preservation-award-news/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 14:30:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/roe-jan-brewing-wins-state-historic-preservation-award-news/ HILLSDALE – The Roe Jan Brewing Company received a New York State Historic Preservation Award in 2021 for its rehabilitation work on the former Bulkeley store building. The site was built by Joshua Bulkeley to house The Bulkeley Store, a former heavy-frame commercial building, erected in 1851 to house the Hillsdale Mercantile Association. It is […]]]>


HILLSDALE – The Roe Jan Brewing Company received a New York State Historic Preservation Award in 2021 for its rehabilitation work on the former Bulkeley store building.

The site was built by Joshua Bulkeley to house The Bulkeley Store, a former heavy-frame commercial building, erected in 1851 to house the Hillsdale Mercantile Association. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places as part of the Hillsdale Hamlet Historic District.

Over the years, the building has housed many general stores; a shirt factory, a beer bottling operation, a farm supply store, a lumber storage business and a pop-up art gallery.

When Steve Bluestone and his wife Kathy purchased the historic building in June 2018, the space had been vacant for over 20 years and was slowly deteriorating.

“We wanted it to look like it was when it was first built,” Steve said.

The foundations were crumbling and the walls were starting to crumble. To restore the building, a new foundation was built and the ground was lifted 6 feet from the ground. About half of the original windows were salvaged during the renovation. In addition, in order to preserve the architectural integrity of the historic building, the outer layer of the cladding was peeled off and the rotten roof supports were replaced with replicas of the originals. Throughout the process, Steve and Kathy are committed to preserving the historic and architectural features of the building, in order to honor its rich history.

Their restoration efforts were recognized this year by the state; the award they received went to nine groups and one individual who have contributed to the restoration and adaptive reuse of historic sites.

“It probably would have been cheaper to build a whole new building,” Steve said. He worked in construction all his life and declared categorically: “there was no other way but to restore the building”.

The news comes just two weeks after the Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation released New York State’s Historic Preservation Plan (2021-2026). One of the goals of the plan is to “help plan the continued use and preservation of heritage resources for the benefit of future New Yorkers.”

The plan is an attempt to induce New Yorkers to benefit socially and economically from historic preservation. It also offers owners of certified historic income-generating properties a 20% Federal Preservation Income Tax Credit and 20% for active restoration projects.

The Bluestones estimate that 30% of the “millions” they spent on the project will be deducted from their taxes. So, for example, if they receive a tax credit of $ 300,000, whatever they owe in personal taxes will be deducted from that amount each year until it is fully used. The tax incentive is provided by the state to encourage New Yorkers to turn old historic buildings on their properties into business operations and to create jobs and tourism in cities across the state.

“The diversity of recognized projects demonstrates that preservation begins with passionate local individuals extending their advocacy into productive partnerships,” said Erik Kulleseid, Commissioner of National Parks. “We are proud to be one of these partners and congratulate all individuals and groups for their extraordinary efforts to preserve these historic places.

The State Historic Preservation Awards were established in 1980 by the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation.

As an Amazon Associate, I earn income on qualifying purchases.


]]>
Portland City Council Considering Changes to Historic Preservation Plan https://preservethenati.org/portland-city-council-considering-changes-to-historic-preservation-plan/ https://preservethenati.org/portland-city-council-considering-changes-to-historic-preservation-plan/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 20:02:30 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/portland-city-council-considering-changes-to-historic-preservation-plan/ Some of Portland’s top neighborhoods enjoy the perks of being listed on the National Register of Historic Places: no demolitions, no McMansions or endless rows of square condos. It also often means that there is no new and affordable housing. All of that could change due to a proposal being considered by Portland City Council […]]]>


Some of Portland’s top neighborhoods enjoy the perks of being listed on the National Register of Historic Places: no demolitions, no McMansions or endless rows of square condos. It also often means that there is no new and affordable housing.

All of that could change due to a proposal being considered by Portland City Council starting this week, which is in part intended to address the major housing shortage in the area, especially when it comes to affordable housing.

As part of the updates proposed in the draft historical resources code, developers would be able to demolish structures in several other situations, including in individual residential areas in historic neighborhoods designated by the federal government on the National Register, but only if the demolition of the building could create more housing. affordable or for more people. (The full draft of the Historic Resources Draft Code is 262 pages long and also includes revisions to the city’s processes for selecting historic neighborhoods in the first place.)

It’s not just pretty old houses. A long pattern of policies both racially explicit and implicit have shaped Portland’s housing landscape from the start – racial alliances in the early 20th century effectively prohibited people of color from owning land, creating wealth or even reside in parts of Portland like Ladd’s Addition and the Southwest Hills.

In the second half of the 20th century, cheap housing like apartments and duplexes were banned on over 70% of the city’s residential lots, and, until the legislature passed an inclusive zoning law in 2016, there was a citywide ban on cities. requiring developers to create at least some affordable housing in their projects.

The HRCP and its potential changes are just the latest in a series of zoning changes designed to make the city more affordable for more people. Passed by city council in August 2020 and came into effect in August 2021, the somewhat controversial residential infill project has encouraged the construction of many more duplexes (and triplexes and quads) in parts of Portland where they don’t. were not allowed before. Despite these changes, some districts are still effectively exempt from infill: historic districts.

As with other older and nearby neighborhoods, many historic neighborhoods, including Ladd’s Addition, Laurelhurst and Irvington, have at least some exclusionary policies in their past. When neighborhoods like this are protected from change, they preserve that same exclusion, says Luke Norman, co-head of fair zoning for Portland housing reform group: Neighbors Welcome.

“The preservation of history is not inherently racist, but, intentionally or unintentionally, it has been used by some districts in a racist manner,” says Norman. “Our historical codes should honor our diverse history, not allow our whitest neighborhoods to remain exclusive.”

Right now, it takes a long and complex process involving the Portland Planning and Sustainability Commission and the Historic Landmarks Commission, as well as a city council vote, to demolish a “contributing building” in a historic district (that is, (i.e. any building deemed to add to the district’s historic designation), in a process called a demolition review.

Norman’s group wants to keep the demolition review for local historic neighborhoods, which are subject to city council control, but change it for national registry neighborhoods, which are created independently of local or state government. He recommends an amendment that would allow demolition in National Register Districts in as many cases as possible by state law. For National Register districts, which tend to be closer, well served by public transport and very walkable, such a change could make housing in these areas more accessible to middle-income families and first time buyers.

But housing advocates say many developments in a neighborhood can also inflate property values ​​and contribute to gentrification and displacement. This was a major fear during hearings for the residential infill project, with an eye on low-income neighborhoods like Lents and Montavilla. This could also be of concern in conservation districts with larger BIPOC populations like Mississippi Avenue. (The city defines conservation districts as “important geographic areas at the neighborhood level and regulated with more flexible historic resource protections than historic districts”, meaning they have less protections against demolition and redevelopment .)

Some council observers are skeptical of the real affordability of new developments in historic neighborhoods. Developers of affordable housing, who will not recoup the costs from high rents, often want to get their money’s worth, usually through grants, subsidies and tax breaks. They might therefore find that it makes more sense to develop in areas with low land value, and not in historic neighborhoods.

Another point of contention is the city’s democratic oversight of demolitions, particularly with the Historic Monuments Commission, a city-appointed group of seven who help oversee historic buildings and neighborhoods. Part of the draft historic resources code would expand exactly who can sit on the commission and approve new developments. At present, the rules are rather strict, requiring a local historian, an architectural historian and an architect, along with four other members with relevant expertise.

The HRCP would reject these rules and allow the mayor to appoint members to the Historic Monuments Commission with less direct expertise on historic preservation issues. The new language includes anyone with “professional experience and knowledge in one or more of the following categories: historic preservation, local history, architectural history, architecture, landscape architecture, real estate, economics, construction, community development, town planning, archeology, law, finance, cultural geography, cultural anthropology, management of cultural resources or related disciplines “as long as they have a“ demonstrated interest, skill or knowledge of historic preservation. ”(In the proposed rules , there could also be up to two individual members, and no more than two of the seven members “may be active in the purchase, sale, rental or development of real estate for profit.”)

Requiring only “demonstrated interest” raises concerns for John Liu, a lawyer and former member of the board of directors of the Laurelhurst Neighborhood Association. “You could have a historic monuments commission of seven people, two of which are full members and the rest are real estate brokers, lawyers, bankers and entrepreneurs,” he said of the changes. proposed. “There is actually no requirement that one person on the HLC be a recognized expert in architectural history. ”

Interest in potential changes is high. More than 100 people have registered to testify at a city council hearing midweek on November 3. A vote is expected later this year.


]]>
https://preservethenati.org/portland-city-council-considering-changes-to-historic-preservation-plan/feed/ 0
Aguiar: State Historic Preservation Office accepts demolition of Main Street building https://preservethenati.org/aguiar-state-historic-preservation-office-accepts-demolition-of-main-street-building/ Thu, 12 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/aguiar-state-historic-preservation-office-accepts-demolition-of-main-street-building/ Riverhead Town has reached an agreement with the New York State Historic Preservation Office to allow the demolition of a historic building on East Main Street to make way for the planned town square, Supervisor Yvette Aguiar announced today. The 117 East Main Street building, one of Swezey’s former department stores, was designated a “contributory […]]]>


Riverhead Town has reached an agreement with the New York State Historic Preservation Office to allow the demolition of a historic building on East Main Street to make way for the planned town square, Supervisor Yvette Aguiar announced today.

The 117 East Main Street building, one of Swezey’s former department stores, was designated a “contributory resource” when the historic Main Street area was listed on the National Register in 2012. The building was a contributory resource because of its facade and front windows, according to Riverhead Landmarks Preservation Commission Chairman Richard Wines.

The city is now seeking to have the unoccupied and dilapidated building removed as a contributing asset. But the State Historic Preservation Office needs to agree, so that the federal and state grants the city hopes to get are not jeopardized.

“After reviewing a substantial amount of documents compiled by the Department of Community Development, SHPO agreed that there was no prudent and / or feasible alternative to demolition,” Aguiar said in a statement.

The State Historic Preservation Office did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Render of a town square in the center of the Main Street business district. Image: Associates in Urban Design

City Council authorized the purchase of the building and two adjacent buildings on the south side of East Main Street from Riverhead Enterprises for $ 4.85 million. The city concluded the deal in May. Authorities plan to demolish two of the buildings – at 117 and 121 East Main Street – and work with a private entity to renovate and expand the third building, located at 127 East Main Street, a two-story building occupied by commercial tenants in two floors.

The state has agreed that the three buildings can be razed, if the city deems it necessary, Aguiar said.

Plans for the town square, developed by consultant Urban Design Associates, envision the building at 127 East Main and the adjacent building at 117 East Main to the west – which was purchased by the LI Science Center – to “frame »The town square with small shops. The newly created green space will provide a connection between Main Street and the riverside.

Representatives from the State Historic Preservation Office traveled to Riverhead last month to meet with city officials and tour the site.

“The Town of Riverhead is more than pleased that this transformation project can now proceed in earnest,” Aguiar said today. “The State Historic Preservation Office has been cooperative, reasonable and receptive to working with Riverhead to ensure that a mutually beneficial solution has been found,” she said.

The Supervisor thanked MP Jodi Giglio, former City Councilor for Riverhead and long-time City Council Liaison to the Monuments Committee, for arranging the visit to SHPO.

“As a representative of Riverhead in Albany, I felt it was my responsibility to help facilitate a productive dialogue with SHPO,” said Giglio. “I have no doubts that Riverhead Town Square will make a significant contribution to the economic renaissance of downtown Riverhead and the Long Island area,”

Landmarks Chairman Wines said the Monuments Commission was delighted that the SHPO agreed that there was no workable alternative to demolishing buildings to make way for the town square.

“We look forward to working with them on this important project and sharing their focus to make sure it fits and is compatible with our historic downtown architecture,” Wines said.

The next step is SHPO’s development of a resolution letter that will document the alternatives assessed and mitigation measures to be taken to minimize historical impacts, said Director of Community Development Dawn Thomas.

“These measures may include the remembrance of 117 East Main Street to SHPO standards, the recovery of defining features, the creation and installation of a commemorative plaque commemorating 117 East Main Street and its significance to the historic district, and the continuation of consultations with SHPO during the construction of the city. Square is making progress, ”according to a press release issued by the supervisor today.

The main goal of the town square project is to reorient the pedestrian orientation of the traditional main street to the Peconic Riverwalk, officials said.

“The city intends to transform some of the city’s existing waterfront parking lots into public gathering areas, with performance spaces, splash fountains, permeable brick / stone paths and rain gardens. These rain and river-friendly areas will provide amenities for community members while helping to capture occasional flooding that has occurred near the Peconic River. In addition, the site will include interactive environmental learning stations, ”says the city’s press release.

Riverhead Town applied for a multi-million dollar federal grant in July and continues to aggressively seek other federal, state and county funding opportunities to pursue economic redevelopment goals, Thomas said. She said it is likely that a public-private partnership will be needed to fully develop the town square.

Support local journalism.
More than ever, the survival of quality local journalism depends on your support. Our community is facing unprecedented economic disruption and the future of many small businesses is threatened, including our own. It takes time and resources to provide this service. We are a small family business and we will do everything in our power to keep it going. But now more than ever, we will depend on your support to keep going. Support RiverheadLOCAL today. You depend on us to stay informed and we depend on you to make our work possible.


]]>
Vermont: Historic Preservation Grants Awarded to 13 Projects https://preservethenati.org/vermont-historic-preservation-grants-awarded-to-13-projects/ Sun, 08 Aug 2021 18:12:36 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/vermont-historic-preservation-grants-awarded-to-13-projects/ State grants for the preservation of history totaling $ 204,896 allocated to 13 projects Montpellier Governor, VT (STL.News) Phil Scott, the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation and the Vermont Advisory Council on Historic Preservation today announced the recipients of the 2021 State Historic Preservation Grants . The grants, totaling $ 204,896, were awarded to 13 […]]]>


State grants for the preservation of history totaling $ 204,896 allocated to 13 projects

Montpellier Governor, VT (STL.News) Phil Scott, the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation and the Vermont Advisory Council on Historic Preservation today announced the recipients of the 2021 State Historic Preservation Grants . The grants, totaling $ 204,896, were awarded to 13 municipalities and state-wide nonprofits in eight counties, facilitating the repair and rehabilitation of important historic buildings.

“Investing in the preservation of historic sites strengthens our communities and further enhances the Vermont brand,” said Governor Scott. “These grants help honor our past, create new opportunities for our future, and play an important role in revitalizing our city centers and towns.”

“Preserving historic sites seems more important than ever, as local landmarks give Vermonters a sense of belonging and pride,” said Laura V. Trieschmann, State of Vermont Historic Preservation Officer. “These grants enable investments that increase awareness of our heritage, educate the public about historic resources and strengthen Vermont’s economic growth. These grant recipients deserve to be recognized for their commitment to our historic places.

An equivalent historical preservation grant of $ 20,000 was awarded to the Town of Randolph to support the traditional restoration of the plaster cast in the main auditorium of Chandler Music Hall. This important local entertainment venue was built through the philanthropy of Colonel Albert B. Chandler. In 1947, it was ceded to the City, who considered demolishing the building before a local group launched an ambitious rehabilitation project from 1972. Today, the Chandler attracts around 20,000 visitors a year, with musical events, children’s and youth programs and art exhibitions.

The Henry Sheldon Museum in Middlebury, the town of Moretown and the Enosburg Masons have received grants for the restoration, repair and weatherization of historic windows – important both for the preservation of these historic features as well as for the overall energy efficiency of these public buildings. Grants were also given to fund structural repairs at McIndoes Falls Academy in Barnet, the historic restoration of the two-story porch of the East Calais General Store and the repair of the steeple at Granville Town Hall.

For a complete list of awarded projects, visit the Historic Preservation Division website.

Established in 1986, the state-funded historic preservation grant program provides matching grants for building improvement projects that promote Vermont’s architectural heritage. Since its inception, the program has awarded more than $ 5 million in support of 550 historic building projects. To be eligible, buildings must be listed or may be listed in the National Register of Historic Places and the work carried out must comply with the rehabilitation standards of the Secretary of the Interior. The program is very competitive. In 2020, the Advisory Board reviewed 37 project applications, requesting more than $ 460,000 in funding.


]]>
State historic preservation officials visit Riverhead to discuss town square plan https://preservethenati.org/state-historic-preservation-officials-visit-riverhead-to-discuss-town-square-plan/ Thu, 22 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/state-historic-preservation-officials-visit-riverhead-to-discuss-town-square-plan/ State historic preservation officials traveled to the historic Main Street district of Riverhead yesterday to inspect one of the buildings the town intends to demolish for the creation of its planned town square . They met with city officials and MP Jodi Giglio, who organized the visit. “It was a very productive meeting,” Giglio said […]]]>


State historic preservation officials traveled to the historic Main Street district of Riverhead yesterday to inspect one of the buildings the town intends to demolish for the creation of its planned town square .

They met with city officials and MP Jodi Giglio, who organized the visit.

“It was a very productive meeting,” Giglio said yesterday afternoon.

Supervisor Yvette Aguiar, Community Development Administrator Dawn Thomas, Monument Preservation Committee Chairman Richard Wines and City Community Development and Engineering Department staff met with visitors from the State Department of Parks , recreation and historical preservation.

Giglio said Assistant Historic Preservation Commissioner Daniel McKay and State Historic Preservation Office staff Beth Cumming and Robyn Sedgwick came for the visit, which the Riverhead Community Development Office coordinated.

MP Jodi Giglio and Supervisor Yvette Aguiar on Main Street yesterday for a meeting with state historic preservation officials. Courtesy Photo: Town of Riverhead / Joseph Maiorana

The building at 117 E. Main St. was designated a “contributory resource” when the Historic Main Street was listed on the National Register in 2012. The building was a contributory resource because of its facade and front windows. , according to Wines. It is one of three buildings the city recently purchased from Riverhead Enterprises with the intention of demolishing two.

The city is now seeking to have the building removed as a contributing asset. But the State Historic Preservation Office has to agree, so that the federal and state grants the city hopes to get are not jeopardized.

“When the neighborhood was created, the building still had the original facade and the windows are typical of 1950s architecture,” Wines told RiverheadLOCAL earlier this month. “The facade has since fallen and has been replaced,” he said. “The rest is in pretty bad shape. Wines said he fully supports the removal of this building for the town square.

Thomas, who took the lead on the town square project, said state officials “fully understand the issues” and “appreciate our concept and think we can work together.” The state wants to ensure that the historic character of Main Street is incorporated into the town square, Thomas said.

“They’re worried about having a big gap there,” Thomas said. “There doesn’t have to be a building there. You can build a siege wall or maybe an iron arch, ”she said. similar to the one a few steps east. The idea, she said, is to “maintain the visual plane created by buildings.”

A spokesperson for historic preservation staff from the State Office of Parks, Recreation, and Historic Preservation had “a productive conversation with city officials about ways the city could refine the project to mitigate the impacts. »Of the demolition on the historic district.

“We look forward to formally reviewing the final plans,” Public Information Officer Dan Keefe said this afternoon.

Thomas said that the design of the town square is at a very preliminary stage and the town can certainly incorporate the thoughts of state officials. The city has previously discussed the idea with Barry Long of Urban Design Associates, who is working with the city to develop a plan for the town square.

“We were very happy to show them around,” Thomas said.

Giglio said she was grateful for the visit. “They were knowledgeable, clear and gave a great idea of ​​the importance of streetscapes in a historic community,” she said.

“The representatives from the Town of Riverhead were receptive and understood the ideas presented,” said Giglio. “We have a clear path to follow. ”

Editor’s Note: This article was edited after its initial publication to add a comment from a spokesperson for the State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation provided after press time.

Support local journalism.
More than ever, the survival of quality local journalism depends on your support. Our community is facing unprecedented economic disruption and the future of many small businesses is threatened, including our own. It takes time and resources to provide this service. We are a small family business and we will do everything in our power to keep it going. But today more than ever, we will depend on your support to keep going. Support RiverheadLOCAL today. You depend on us to stay informed and we depend on you to make our work possible.


]]>
Jersey City Historic Preservation Commission approves ‘courtesy review’ for Loew renovations https://preservethenati.org/jersey-city-historic-preservation-commission-approves-courtesy-review-for-loew-renovations/ https://preservethenati.org/jersey-city-historic-preservation-commission-approves-courtesy-review-for-loew-renovations/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/jersey-city-historic-preservation-commission-approves-courtesy-review-for-loew-renovations/ The Jersey City Historic Preservation Commission approved a “courtesy review” for the renovation of Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theater in Journal Square during last night’s meeting, where several commissioners asked for more details on the project. By Daniel Ulloa / Hudson County View They did not have the power to block the project and as a […]]]>


The Jersey City Historic Preservation Commission approved a “courtesy review” for the renovation of Landmark Loew’s Jersey Theater in Journal Square during last night’s meeting, where several commissioners asked for more details on the project.

By Daniel Ulloa / Hudson County View

They did not have the power to block the project and as a result many referred to it as a “courtesy review”.

There will be an extensive renovation and restoration of the interior and exterior of the 92 year old building. Devils Arena Entertainment (DAE) is paying a $ 72 million renovation bill originally slated for a 2025 completion date.

DAE attorney Frank Regan said the theater renovation could serve as a catalyst for an artistic renaissance in Jersey City.

The Jersey City Planning Board has requested a review of the renovation project by the Historic Preservation Commission before its own hearing.

Gary Martinez, of OTJ Architects, noted that a lot of renovations are needed, although the theater is in better condition than others he has worked on with more historic original materials that can be left in place.

He also noted the need to repair the vast terracotta brick. However, they need to do more investigation.

“We want to get as close as possible,” he said.

They want to make sure that everything is safe and that the spare parts are removed.

An old cooling tower and a water tower will be removed so that new infrastructure can be installed there if necessary.

Martinez later explained that they had to make sure there were no water leaks through the terracotta building.

In response to a report from Friends of the Loew’s that air enters through a side door as designed, they want to create a door vestibule, as well as add an elevator for people with disabilities.

Martinez said the new side door will help with traffic in the winter.

“There are only a limited number of people who can walk through the front door at a time,” he said.

They know that the fire escape needs to be replaced and that two new loading doors would be added.

They will also change the seats to make them visible to everyone. Much work has been done to preserve the ornate ceiling. They want to be very delicate.

Commission Chairman Brian Blazak asked if they were going to apply for tax credits, to which Regan replied that they were exploring many sources of funding, including historic tax credits.

From there, Commissioner Austin Sakong said the presentation was too broad.

“These are really the details,” he said, noting that there was an “absence of all the things we typically demand of our candidates.”

“In the absence of all of those things, how do you suggest that we look at the request without being a rubber stamp?” Sakong continued.

Martinez took note of his remarks and said the renderings would be available as the project progressed.

“We’re long on the story and short on the details,” he admitted.

Regan said they are on schedule to complete the project by January 2024.

“I don’t know what I’m voting on. What is the finished product that we get in terms of quality level, level of completion? Added Commissioner Stephen Gucciardo.

Martinez sought to assure them of the process and noted that they would be working to restore it in great detail.

“These plans are more conceptual than we are used to,” said Blazak.

The commission agonized over the nature of the project for several minutes given the lack of details.

“It could be catastrophic or glorious,” said Dan Wrieden, head of historic preservation.

Regan noted that the planning board will review the plan next.

“It’s a half-prepared request at this point,” said Commissioner Robert Gordon.

Friends of Loews executive director Colin Egan said he had been involved in the preservation of Loew’s Theater since 1987 and explained that they had worked hard to preserve the building.

“We’re very, very happy to be working with the city at this point,” Egan said.

He noted that they would continue to provide the programming and preserve it as outlined in the developer’s RFP.

Egan acknowledged that this was an early part of the designs, but said he was confident in the plans.

However, he wanted the center aisle to be maintained, which would be done away with in the redesigned seats. Also, he didn’t want a TV permanently installed in the lobby.

“I, too, have concerns about the accuracy of what is being planned,” Egan said.

Senior historic preservation specialist Maggie O’Neil said other agencies are reviewing the plan and will take their notes into consideration. She noted that the theater is part of Plan Square Journal 2060.

O’Neil spoke well of the plan, saying “We are very happy with it.”

She added that they were upset with the plan which says “demolish too much because they want to restore the theater”.

O’Neil said they agreed with Egan on keeping the theater’s center aisle.

After much debate when reviewing the plans, they decided to make sure that the state preservation office would allow them to review the plans completed in October to make sure they are complete.

“We’re happy to come back,” Regan said, urging O’Neil not to check for timely updates.

“Absolutely, it’s part of the process,” Martinez agreed.

Loew’s Theater is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, as well as the New Jersey List of Historic Places.

The measure was finally adopted unanimously (7-0).


]]>
https://preservethenati.org/jersey-city-historic-preservation-commission-approves-courtesy-review-for-loew-renovations/feed/ 0
Philadelphia institutions receive grants for historic preservation https://preservethenati.org/philadelphia-institutions-receive-grants-for-historic-preservation/ https://preservethenati.org/philadelphia-institutions-receive-grants-for-historic-preservation/#respond Sun, 20 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/philadelphia-institutions-receive-grants-for-historic-preservation/ Sign up for our daily email newsletter to stay up to date with the latest local news across Philadelphia. A dozen historic institutions in Philadelphia recently received grants from the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. The Keystone Historic Preservation (KHP) Grants Program is used to fund the preservation, rehabilitation and restoration activities of historic sites […]]]>


Sign up for our daily email newsletter to stay up to date with the latest local news across Philadelphia.

A dozen historic institutions in Philadelphia recently received grants from the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. The Keystone Historic Preservation (KHP) Grants Program is used to fund the preservation, rehabilitation and restoration activities of historic sites that are eligible or listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

Fifty-four historic Commonwealth institutions received these funds, 11 of which reside within the city limits of Philadelphia. Grant applications ranged from $ 5,000 to $ 25,000 for planning projects and $ 5,000 to $ 100,000 for construction projects; but each applicant was required to provide a 50% cash consideration to prove the sponsor’s commitment.

Overall, approximately $ 436,000 has been awarded to historic institutions in Philadelphia. Only two groups received the maximum allocation of $ 100,000: the John Bartram Association (aka Bartram’s Garden) and the Third, Scots and Mariners Presbyterian Church.

At Bartram’s Garden, grant funds will be used for crucial repairs to the oldest barn in the county, built in 1775, and the adjacent stable, built in 1743. Roofs and masonry in both are to be maintained after centuries of wear and tear. Likewise, the Third, Scots and Mariners Presbyterian Church on Pine Street in Society Hill predates the American Revolution and will be used to repair the exterior of Old Pine Street Church.

The 11 historic monuments will use these funds to build or restore part of their infrastructure in one way or another, just as sites reopen after COVID.

“We have been forced to shut down for much of 2020 due to the pandemic,” said Jeff Duncan of the Naomi Woods Trust. The Naomi Woods Trust received $ 55,788 to support the restoration of two rooms that once housed enslaved Africans in the Woodford Mansion, located in Fairmount Park.

“What this grant will help us do is better tell the story of the slaves who lived and worked at Woodford Mansion, a story we all look forward to being able to tell to the public because it is part of the story of Woodford. just as slavery is part of American history, ”Duncan said.

The Woodford Mansion focuses on the experiences of the slaves who lived and worked there, rather than focusing on “the lives of the wealthy families who built or owned Woodford”.

The funds needed to carry out routine maintenance projects may not be entirely salacious, but they are essential for historic monuments to remain relevant. The Stenton Mansion in Germantown received $ 42,000 + to restore 10 sash windows and paint the exterior, renovations that will allow future generations to see the home of James Logan, William Penn’s secretary.

Grumblethorpe in Germantown has fought to exist since 1930 and has been a driving force in the movement to preserve local monuments. Through the Philadelphia Society for the Preservation of Landmarks, Grumblethorpe received $ 18,675 “to replace the roofs of the museum and the tenants’ house” built in 1742.

Of 92 applicants to the Keystone Historic Preservation (KHP) grant program, 54 received funding. In total, more than $ 2,300,000 was distributed to preserve historic monuments across the Commonwealth.

Philadelphia Grant Recipients

National Trust Cliveden – $ 24,923

Cranaleith Spiritual Center – $ 11,344

Glen Foerd Conservation Corp. – $ 14,266

History RittenhouseTown Inc. – $ 32,674

John Bartram Association (aka Bartram’s Garden) – $ 100,000

Naomi Wood Trust – $ 55,788

Philadelphia Society for the Preservation of Monuments – $ 18,675

The National Society of Colonial Dames of America in Pennsylvania – $ 42,315

Third, Scots and Mariners Presbyterian Church – $ 100,000

Trinity Episcopal Memorial Church – $ 11,890

Wagner Free Institute of Sciences – $ 25,000


]]>
https://preservethenati.org/philadelphia-institutions-receive-grants-for-historic-preservation/feed/ 0