natural resources – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ Sun, 27 Mar 2022 04:43:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://preservethenati.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/nati.png natural resources – Preserve The Nati http://preservethenati.org/ 32 32 Alexander County Achieves Certified Local Government Status for Historic Preservation https://preservethenati.org/alexander-county-achieves-certified-local-government-status-for-historic-preservation/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 16:30:42 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/alexander-county-achieves-certified-local-government-status-for-historic-preservation/ March 9, 2022 – Alexander County joins 11 counties and 60 cities in North Carolina as Certified Local Government (CLG) through the State Historic Preservation Office and the National Park Service. The commissioners approved an agreement to become a GLC at their March 7 meeting. Connie Kincaid, Business Development Manager at Alexander County Economic Development […]]]>

March 9, 2022 – Alexander County joins 11 counties and 60 cities in North Carolina as Certified Local Government (CLG) through the State Historic Preservation Office and the National Park Service. The commissioners approved an agreement to become a GLC at their March 7 meeting.

Connie Kincaid, Business Development Manager at Alexander County Economic Development Corporation and Staff Liaison for the Alexander County Historic Preservation Committee, presented information about the CLG program and associated benefits. The National Historic Preservation Act established the CLG program to provide financial and technical assistance to preserve historic properties in counties and municipalities that have their own Historic Preservation Commission and program that meets federal and state standards.

Kincaid said a key benefit of being a CLG is the ability to compete for grants to advance local historic preservation efforts. The county will also receive technical assistance and training from the State Historic Preservation Office and participate in appointments to the National Register of Historic Placesas well as other benefits.

The commissioners expressed their appreciation to the Alexander County Historic Preservation Committee for their hard work and dedication.

Along the same lines, the commissioners heard a report from Audrey Thomas, a specialist in historical surveys at the State Historic Preservation Office, regarding the Taylorsville Comprehensive Municipal Study that was completed within the past year. She said the architectural survey creates a lasting record of historic places, promotes a better understanding of local heritage and identifies significant properties. During the project, Thomas inspected 176 individual buildings in the city, including industrial, institutional, religious, commercial and residential properties.

In June 2021, the Downtown Taylorsville Historic District was placed on the state’s Review List identifying potential for listing on the National Register. She determined that 33 buildings in the district are eligible to be listed on the National Register of Historic Places. She said there would be no obligations or restrictions for private owners; however, they would be eligible for tax incentives during federally and state-approved preservation projects.

In other economic development news, David Icenhour, Executive Director of Alexander County EDC, provided information on a $500,000 grant the county received from the North Carolina Railroad Company (NCRR) for the purpose of ranking a site in the Alexander Industrial Park. Icenhour said the goal is to create a rail-served site that will be attractive for future industrial prospect. Alexander County is one of six counties to receive the NCRR “Build Ready Sites” grant.

In addition, EDC received a grant of $632,412 from the GOLD LEAF Foundation in December 2021, which will be combined with the NCRR grant for a total of $1,132,412 for the project, which includes engineering, design and grading.

“We are extremely grateful for the grants from the North Carolina Railroad Company and the Golden LEAF Foundation, and we look forward to seeing this project translate into new jobs and investment for Alexander County,” Icenhour said.

Commissioners unanimously approved the grant agreement with the NCRR.

• County Manager Rick French presented information on Alexander County Courthouse Park, Rotary Performance Stage and splash pad. He said the dedication and ribbon cutting for the Alexander County Courthouse grounds and rotating performance stage is scheduled for Sunday, May 15, with remarks from local officials, special entertainment and vendors. of food. Although the paddling pool will not open until after the inauguration on May 15 this year, the normal schedule is offered from April 1 to September 30 from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

He also discussed a daily fee schedule for renting Courthouse Park, which is free to local nonprofits and for-profits with a $150 maintenance/cleaning fee and a refundable security deposit. of $300. For organizations outside the county, there will be an additional charge. A parks ordinance was also revised.

Commissioners will further review and vote on the park proposals at their April 4 meeting.

• John Wear, Deputy Director of Community and Regional Planning for the Western Piedmont Council of Governmentssubmitted offers for Emergency Watershed Protection Program. A number of local waterways filled with debris following the November 2020 flood.

The Alexander County Soil and Water Conservation District (ACSWCD) received a $79,500 grant from the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). The grant also pays $11,925 to WPCOG for technical assistance.

Wear said the lowest bidder responsible for the project is Shaun Lackey Excavating LLC with a bid of $190,000, which includes chipping and burning debris as it is removed from three sites. Including technical assistance costs, the project totals $209,000. ACSWCD coordinator Pamela Bowman said she would be applying for an additional grant.

The commissioners approved the low bid on the understanding that no county funds are being used for the project at this time.

• County Manager French introduced a number of amendments to the budget order, including an amendment to adjust the employee bonus budget to be paid in March 2022 by $1,000 for full-time employees eligible and $500 for eligible part-time employees.

Chairman Ronnie Reese said he was pleased to be able to offer county staff an incentive. “We try to do certain things to help our employees. When we received the ARPA funding that we use for water infrastructure, it freed up money that we can use for other things like employee bonuses,” Reese said.

• Commissioners held a public hearing on a proposed county ordinance to establish child safety zones in Alexander County. Sheriff Chris Bowman said he received a call several months ago from a concerned parent about a registered sex offender parking at school bus stops. Detectives Buddy McKinney and Dennis Foster began investigating the case and discovered that the state status does not include bus stops in the ‘sex offender illegally present’ section. Sheriff Bowman said Henderson County has passed an ordinance to establish child safety zones and Iredell County is considering passing a similar ordinance.

Detective McKinney said the number one objective of the order is the safety of children and to be able to enforce the prevention of loitering at bus stops.

Commissioners have expressed concern over the issue and support for the order. A special meeting was scheduled for March 21 at 6:00 p.m. via Zoom to vote on the ordinance.

• In the County Manager’s report, Mr. French noted three upcoming events: Alexander County 6/12/24 Hour Race at Alexander Central High School on April 2 and 3, RockyFest on April 23 and the grand opening of the Alexander County Courthouse grounds on May 15.

Consolidated Meeting of the Social Services Council
• Kristy Hunt, senior center director, said programming is beginning to increase at the senior center as COVID-19 cases continue to decline. Participants appreciate the group exercises and music. Staff continue to help with health insurance plans. AARP offers free tax preparation services on Saturdays. A celebration of seniors is planned for May 27 with special music by Rick Cline.

• Billie Walker, Deputy Director of Health, provided an update on COVID-19. Alexander County has a cumulative total of 10,359 cases, with 71 cases in the past 14 days and 21 cases in the past 7 days. There have been 137 deaths associated with the virus. Alexander County has a test positivity rate of 4.8% while North Carolina has a rate of 3.9%.

• Leeanne Whisnant, Director of Consolidated Social Services, provided a Social Services update. She said the state recently conducted the Recipient Eligibility Determination Audit (REDA), which showed 97% approval actions, 96% denial/termination actions, and 96% approval. technical errors. The state requires a minimum of 96.8 percent for all three categories, so the department submitted an accuracy improvement plan to the state. Starting in June, the state will verify 10 records per month until 96.8% is achieved for three consecutive months.

Whisnant reminded the board of the Low Income Water Assistance Program (LIWAP). The department received $50,101, with $29,284.91 used through February 2022.

The department also offers the Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LIEAP). The local DSS received $148,282 from the program, of which $91,400 was used through February 2022. They received an additional $194,512 from the American Rescue Plan Act, of which $71,000 was used through February .

She said there are currently 67 children in foster care, with one adoption in 2021 and four adoptions so far in 2022. There are currently 10 participants in the foster parent class which started in January. If you are interested in one of these programs, call the Alexander County DSS at (828) 632-1080.

March is National Social Work Month. National Public Health Week is celebrated from April 4 to 10.

County Manager French expressed his gratitude to Whisnant and Walker for their hard work during the pandemic.

The Alexander County Board of Commissioners generally meets the first Monday of each month at 6:00 p.m. in Room #103 of the CVCC Alexander Center for Education. The next regular meeting is scheduled for Monday, April 4 at 6:00 p.m. Regular meetings are being recorded and can be viewed on the county’s government channel at Spectrum 192 or on the county’s YouTube channel at www.youtube.com/alexandercountync. Meeting agendas, minutes, videos and more are available on the county’s website at alexandercountync.gov/commissioners.

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Judge: Wisconsin Natural Resources Board Remainders Subject to Open Records Act | local government https://preservethenati.org/judge-wisconsin-natural-resources-board-remainders-subject-to-open-records-act-local-government/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 11:30:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/judge-wisconsin-natural-resources-board-remainders-subject-to-open-records-act-local-government/ A Wisconsin judge has ruled that an embattled member of the state’s Natural Resources Council is a public servant and that communications about his refusal to relinquish his seat are subject to public records law. Former NRB Chairman Fred Prehn has sought to dismiss a lawsuit brought against him and the Department of Natural Resources […]]]>

A Wisconsin judge has ruled that an embattled member of the state’s Natural Resources Council is a public servant and that communications about his refusal to relinquish his seat are subject to public records law.

Former NRB Chairman Fred Prehn has sought to dismiss a lawsuit brought against him and the Department of Natural Resources by Midwest Environmental Advocates, which accused him of violating the state’s Open Archives Act withholding text messages.

Dane County Judge Everett Mitchell declined to dismiss the case, ruling that Prehn is in fact a government authority and that his communications are subject to public records law.






Mitchell


In an order released Tuesday, Mitchell wrote that Prehn’s tenure on the board “has to do with state resource policy decisions, decision-making, and the governor’s ability to appoint new members.” to the NRB”.

Mitchell went on to note that the documents sought were not purely personal, as Prehn argued, “because they clearly relate to NRB business.”

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Mitchell’s decision stopped short of ordering Prehn to hand over the texts, which MEA lawyers now hope will go through the discovery process in court. But the group hailed the decision as a victory for transparency and accountability.

“Dr. Prehn is accountable to law, like any other public official,” MEA attorney Adam Voskuil said. his decision to suspend the expiry of his mandate.”

Prehn’s attorney did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the decision.

A Wausau dentist appointed by former Gov. Scott Walker in 2015, Prehn has refused to step down since his term expired on May 1, denying Gov. Tony Evers’ appointee Sandra Naas a seat.

Prehn argues he can continue to serve until the Senate confirms Naas, but the Republican-led Senate has done nothing to do so, guaranteeing Walker appointees majority control of the board.







Fred Prehn

Prehn


He was replaced in January as chairman but remained on the board, where he voted last month to reject regulations on toxic PFAS compounds in groundwater and to weaken proposed drinking water standards. the agency for so-called “eternal chemicals”.

Not just PFAS: DNR board vote ends years of work on two dozen other groundwater contaminants

Later this week, the state Supreme Court will hear arguments in a separate case brought by Democratic Attorney General Josh Kaul seeking to overthrow him.

According to MEA’s complaint, the environmental group requested all communications — including emails, texts and other written messages — that Prehn sent and received between January 1 and June 29.

The DNR released dozens of emails — mostly from citizens demanding Prehn’s resignation — but no text messages.

In response to a second request, the DNR produced a series of text messages between Prehn and another board member in which he wrote, “I have to decide if I’m going to stay until the next appointee be confirmed. Evers informed me that he was not going to rename me, I guess he thinks there are some pretty big agenda items that I might disagree with LOL.

MEA argues that this indicates the existence of additional text messages relevant to the request and by withholding them, Prehn not only violated the law, but “did great harm to Wisconsin’s tradition of limiting the influence of politics in natural resources and conservation decision-making”.

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Africa’s resources cannot fuel the Western Green Revolution https://preservethenati.org/africas-resources-cannot-fuel-the-western-green-revolution/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 08:27:27 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/africas-resources-cannot-fuel-the-western-green-revolution/ WHEN BORIS Johnson announced plans for a new ‘green industrial revolution’ last November, he promised Britain would become a world leader in green technology. But many other countries are vying for this title. China has made its own plans for its own green industrial revolution. While technological change is badly needed to move industries away […]]]>

WHEN BORIS Johnson announced plans for a new ‘green industrial revolution’ last November, he promised Britain would become a world leader in green technology. But many other countries are vying for this title. China has made its own plans for its own green industrial revolution.

While technological change is badly needed to move industries away from reliance on fossil fuels, the focus on technological advancement underlies two issues. The idea that technology, not substantial structural change, is what will solve the climate crisis is misguided.

The resources needed for such technological changes depend on the same extraction and exploitation practices that have ravaged the southern hemisphere for nearly four centuries. At the center of this exploitation will be the African continent which is experiencing increased competition from foreign powers for access to the mineral resources that would be needed to make the green industrial revolution a reality.

What has often been omitted from much of the discourse on the proposed green industrial revolution is how essential African labour, land and resources have been in fueling economic growth, development and industrial revolutions in the western world.

FUTURE: Africa must take control of its resources to benefit from the green revolution (Photo: Getty)

The exploitation of African resources has been an integral part of this, especially after the colonization of the continent in 1885 by European powers. Africa has 40% of the world’s gold deposits, 90% of the known reserves of chromium and platinum and the largest reserves of cobalt, diamonds and uranium.

To put this into perspective, the uranium used in the development of the nuclear bombs that the United States dropped on the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan in 1945 came from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), l Africa was therefore essential in the development of the atomic age.

Whether it’s a large part of the electronics you use that rely on tantalum, 71% of which comes from Africa, or 58% of the cobalt for your batteries, it’s more than likely that the resources and minerals essentials necessary for modern life to function in an industrialized society were sourced and extracted from somewhere on the African continent. This trend of sourcing resources for technology development is not expected to change in the future.

At COP26, there was little discussion on how unequal value chains in the developing world should be addressed in the context of the climate crisis. The advent of a Western-led green industrial revolution is likely to continue and even intensify this pattern of extraction and dependence on African land and resources to achieve it. With increased investment in green technologies, this has been accompanied by increased interest in extracting raw materials to build the green industries of the future.

The need for more efficient solar panels and batteries will almost certainly come from African minerals and resources. This has been accompanied by an increase in land grabbing by foreign entities. Over 60% of all uncultivated arable land is on the continent, with investors spending over $100 million on over 40 hectares of land.

Competition with the West and other wealthy countries seeking to ensure their development, such as China and Brazil, are at the origin of this important trend. Many analysts say this will spur economic development across the African continent and that many parts of Africa are on the cusp of their own industrial revolutions. According to a report by global management and consultancy firm McKinsey & Company, Africa has the opportunity to leapfrog from previous industrial revolutions to the fourth industrial revolution.

However, there is little evidence to suggest that increasing demand for African resources will stimulate such changes. In fact, it is very possible that the search for natural resources will fuel greater exploitation across the continent. Currently, in some countries, such as the DRC, child labor already represents part of the resources extracted for today’s technology.

Over 72 million children in Africa are involved in child labor, of which 31.5 million are currently trapped in hazardous working conditions. Your laptop or mobile phone contains cobalt and tantalum likely sourced from mined areas of the DRC, with most companies and manufacturing companies refusing to monitor the origin of the minerals.

The reality is that for Western countries to obtain the resources needed to steer their industries towards environmentally friendly production, they will need to obtain these resources at lower cost from exploited labor in the Global South.

This detachment from the urgency of the action needed to meet the challenges of the climate crisis is partly due to the desire to preserve large-scale consumption that characterizes capitalism into the future.

However, this green industrial revolution lacks the revolutionary characteristics of its namesake and represents more of the same patterns of development in the western world. Even more concerning is that, much like the first industrial revolution, Africa is set to play a key role in turning this “revolution” into reality for the West.

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Tajikistan will protect its natural resources and build climate resilience with World Bank support https://preservethenati.org/tajikistan-will-protect-its-natural-resources-and-build-climate-resilience-with-world-bank-support/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 02:24:08 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/tajikistan-will-protect-its-natural-resources-and-build-climate-resilience-with-world-bank-support/ DUSHANBE — The World Bank’s Board of Directors has approved a $45 million grant from the International Development Association (IDA) for the RESILAND CA+ program: Tajikistan’s Resilient Landscape Restoration Project. The objective of the project is to support sustainable land management in Tajikistan and promote collaboration with Central Asian countries on transboundary landscape restoration. This […]]]>

DUSHANBE — The World Bank’s Board of Directors has approved a $45 million grant from the International Development Association (IDA) for the RESILAND CA+ program: Tajikistan’s Resilient Landscape Restoration Project. The objective of the project is to support sustainable land management in Tajikistan and promote collaboration with Central Asian countries on transboundary landscape restoration. This is the first project under the Restoration of Resilient Landscapes in Central Asia (RESILAND CA+) program of the World Bank.


“More than 70% of Tajikistan’s population lives in rural areas and is highly dependent on natural resources, including forests, pastures, water and agricultural land,” said Ozan Sevimli, Country Director of the World Bank. for Tajikistan. “The project will introduce modern approaches and climate-smart practices in the management of forests, rangelands and croplands to help restore natural resources and improve people’s livelihoods.

The Central Asian drylands are among the most rapidly degrading and climate-vulnerable regions of the world. The region is prone to intense weather events and natural disasters, which are expected to worsen due to climate change.

Since 1990, degradation-related disasters have affected the lives of more than 10 million people in Central Asia and caused damage worth about $2.5 billion. In Tajikistan alone, the increased frequency of landslides and mudslides has resulted in an economic cost of around $750 million over the past decade. At least 10% of Tajikistan’s population lives on degraded land, while soil erosion affects about 70% of arable land. Tajikistan’s limited forest cover is rapidly shrinking due to overexploitation and uncontrolled grazing.

The World Bank’s Restoration of Resilient Landscapes in Central Asia Program (RESILAND CA+ Program) was established in 2019 to provide Central Asian countries with a regional landscape restoration framework to increase the resilience of regional landscapes.

In Tajikistan, the project will invest in forest and rangeland management and restoration, climate-smart agricultural practices, knowledge exchange and capacity building, and sustainable management of protected areas. It will also help align policies and implementation frameworks for forests, rangelands and protected areas with international standards and obligations.

These activities are designed to improve rural livelihoods through land-based restoration and conservation activities, while investing in climate change mitigation and adaptation. At the regional level, the project will contribute to improving the connectivity and integrity of natural resources across borders (including biodiversity), increasing the resilience of key regional infrastructure such as roads and protecting the livelihoods of communities. of the hallway.

The project will support Tajikistan’s global climate commitments, including the 2018 Bonn Challenge to restore 66,000 hectares of degraded forest land by 2030, and the 2018 Astana Resolution on Enhanced Cooperation for landscape restoration in Central Asia.

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Community participation is essential for the conservation of wildlife, natural resources https://preservethenati.org/community-participation-is-essential-for-the-conservation-of-wildlife-natural-resources/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 09:54:54 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/community-participation-is-essential-for-the-conservation-of-wildlife-natural-resources/ Tigers and lions play football at the Qingdao Forest Wildlife World in Qingdao, east China’s Shandong province, September 26, 2015. Seven Manchurian tigers and four African lion cubs, all three months old, recently met the press. (Xinhua/Yu Fangping) (lfj) Mr. Joseph Binlinla, Regional Director of the Wildlife Division of the Upper East Region Forestry Commission, […]]]>

Tigers and lions play football at the Qingdao Forest Wildlife World in Qingdao, east China’s Shandong province, September 26, 2015. Seven Manchurian tigers and four African lion cubs, all three months old, recently met the press. (Xinhua/Yu Fangping) (lfj)

Mr. Joseph Binlinla, Regional Director of the Wildlife Division of the Upper East Region Forestry Commission, said community involvement in the conservation of natural resources is essential to stem the tide of depletion. increasing wildlife and forest degradation.

He said the Forestry Commission was working to involve local communities, traditional leaders and district assemblies through the concept of community resource management area (CREMA), in the governance of natural resources to strive to reduce the environmental degradation.

The concept is a strategy to devolve natural resource management powers to groups of communities.

Mr. Binlinla noted that forests and wildlife are being depleted every day due to increased human land use activities jeopardizing the livelihood needs of communities.

In an interview with the Ghana News Agency in Bolgatanga in response to CREMA’s performance in the sustainable management of natural resources, he said that the Wildlife Division of the Forestry Commission was capitalizing on the concept to raise awareness of the importance of natural resources for humanity. .

It is also to complement the role of the Forestry Commission and protect wildlife through regulations the community instituted alongside the Wildlife Preservation Act 43 of 1961.

Mr. Binlinla said communities have since time immemorial depended on the natural environment for various needs, including medicines, building materials, meat, fresh water, wild fruits and many non-timber forest products.

Over the past seven years, some communities in the Northeast, Upper West and Upper East regions have made tremendous progress in managing their natural resources through the establishment of six CREMAs under the sponsorship the Global Environment Facility and the World Bank.

The six include the Sanyiga Kasena Gavara Kara located in Sissala East and Kassena Nankana West districts, and Moagduriru Wontanluri Kuwomsaasi located in Mamprugu Moagduri district.

The others are Builsa Yenning in South Builsa District, Bulkawe in North Builsa, Sissala Kassena Fraah in East Sissala and Chakali Sungmaalu located in Wa East in Upper West Region.

The concept, however, “does not prevent people from cultivating in the area, they are allowed to cultivate farms, take CREMA products to generate income, but the watchword is that the communities protect themselves against over-abstraction of resources because it is unsustainable,” he said.

He said communities were also supported with livelihood businesses including beehives and shea butter processing facilities to improve their livelihoods.

Send your news to newsghana101@gmail.com and via WhatsApp to +233 244244807
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Their view: Protecting the PA’s natural resources, economy from invasive species requires a comprehensive plan https://preservethenati.org/their-view-protecting-the-pas-natural-resources-economy-from-invasive-species-requires-a-comprehensive-plan/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 21:02:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/their-view-protecting-the-pas-natural-resources-economy-from-invasive-species-requires-a-comprehensive-plan/ Pennsylvania’s diverse geography is home to thousands of different species of plants, animals, and insects on land and in our waters. Unfortunately, not all of these organisms are beneficial. Some are non-native invasive species that threaten the natural resources, economy, health and well-being of Pennsylvanians. Invasive species are often introduced and spread unintentionally through […]]]>

Pennsylvania’s diverse geography is home to thousands of different species of plants, animals, and insects on land and in our waters. Unfortunately, not all of these organisms are beneficial.

Some are non-native invasive species that threaten the natural resources, economy, health and well-being of Pennsylvanians.

Invasive species are often introduced and spread unintentionally through trade and consumer choices that seemed harmless a generation ago. They are also spread through other daily activities, such as hiding in firewood and attaching themselves to machinery, boats, cars, trucks and trains.

Once established, invasive species have the potential to change Pennsylvania forever. These invaders threaten our native plants and wildlife with extinction, displacing them for resources and habitat. Invasive species can cause costly damage to crops and agricultural infrastructure. Some directly affect our health by carrying diseases, such as West Nile virus.

Related video

County Conservation District staff work with many entities in rural, suburban, and urban areas of Pennsylvania, applying best practices in agricultural management, stormwater management, and construction-related erosion control. We see the detrimental effects that invasive species can have.

For example, shoreline buffer plantings can fail if invasive plants, such as Japanese knotweed, take over the shoreline, causing tons of sediment to enter our waters and harm aquatic life. Giant hogweed and goat’s rue are two other examples of noxious weeds that are considered harmful to public health, crops, livestock, farmland and other properties.

The value of Pennsylvania’s natural and economic resources and the need to protect the health of Pennsylvanians demands a comprehensive response to the threats posed by invasive species.

The Pennsylvania Invasive Species Council is developing a statewide program called Pennsylvania Regional Invasive Species Management, or PRISM. The PRISM program would be locally based, comprised of experts and stakeholders concerned with invasive species, such as conservation districts, industry associations, government offices, environmental and outdoor recreation organizations, and others.

PRISM would not only manage existing invasive species, but, equally important, monitor new invaders, so that they can be eradicated or controlled before they become a major economic and environmental problem.

National Invasive Species Awareness Week runs from February 28 to March 4. Learn more about PRISM and join the Pennsylvania Association of Conservation Districts, Inc. in supporting the PRISM concept of invasive species management in the Commonwealth.

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Katie Britt posts ‘Alabama the Beautiful’ video highlighting the state’s natural resources https://preservethenati.org/katie-britt-posts-alabama-the-beautiful-video-highlighting-the-states-natural-resources/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 21:36:36 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/katie-britt-posts-alabama-the-beautiful-video-highlighting-the-states-natural-resources/ On Monday, U.S. Senate Republican hopeful Katie Britt’s campaign released a video highlighting Alabama’s natural resources and outdoor activities. The video, titled “Alabama the Beautiful”, was shot at Selwood Farm in Talladega County. From her childhood to the present day, the video depicts the role that outdoor recreation has played in Britt’s family life. Look: […]]]>

On Monday, U.S. Senate Republican hopeful Katie Britt’s campaign released a video highlighting Alabama’s natural resources and outdoor activities.

The video, titled “Alabama the Beautiful”, was shot at Selwood Farm in Talladega County. From her childhood to the present day, the video depicts the role that outdoor recreation has played in Britt’s family life.

Look:

Britt, who serves on the board of the Alabama Wildlife Federation, outlined in a statement her intentions to support the state’s outdoor recreation industry if her bid to become a junior senator for the ‘Alabama was proving successful.

“God has blessed Alabama with an abundance of natural beauty and resources, and our family is very proud of all that our home state has to offer,” Britt said. “From Black Belt to Wiregrass, from Shoals to Lookout Mountain, to our sparkling Gulf Coast, Alabama has something unique for everyone. In the Senate, I will continue to support the preservation of our lands and waterways for the sportsmen and families of Alabama to enjoy for generations to come.I want our great state to always be a place where our children and our children’s children want to live, love, work and raise their own family.

The state of Alabama, rather than the federal government, should hold autonomy over its lands, according to Britt.

“Alabamians are in the best position to preserve and use our own lands, waterways and resources,” Britt added. “We don’t need the feds telling us how to do it, and we certainly don’t need them trying to do it for us. Almost anything the federal government touches turns into a disaster, and they need to stay away and support Alabama-led efforts to ensure our state remains Alabama the Beautiful long into the future.

Dylan Smith is a staff writer for Yellowhammer News. You can follow him on Twitter @DylanSmithAL

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Filling the fund with empty AI resources could help local works in the event of a flood | News https://preservethenati.org/filling-the-fund-with-empty-ai-resources-could-help-local-works-in-the-event-of-a-flood-news/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/filling-the-fund-with-empty-ai-resources-could-help-local-works-in-the-event-of-a-flood-news/ (KMAland) – A little-known program in Iowa continues to pave the way for local coordination of flood prevention strategies, and supporters of the initiative point to an opportunity this year to increase funding . Catchment management authorities (WMA) have been around for more than a decade, and proponents of the program hope lawmakers won’t rule […]]]>

(KMAland) – A little-known program in Iowa continues to pave the way for local coordination of flood prevention strategies, and supporters of the initiative point to an opportunity this year to increase funding .

Catchment management authorities (WMA) have been around for more than a decade, and proponents of the program hope lawmakers won’t rule out a funding provision tied to the current Republican tax system in the State Senate.

WMAs bring together cities, counties, and soil and water conservation districts to better manage flooding and other issues in a watershed.

Kate Hansen, policy associate at the Center for Rural Affairs, said these coalitions could do so much more with consistent support from the state.

“Agricultural practices or educational programs for watershed planning, staffing, there’s so much potential here,” Hansen said. “We would really like that element to stay in place.”

Income tax changes, which advocates for low-income Iowans oppose, are central to the Senate plan. He also calls for moving forward with a sales tax hike approved by voters several years ago for a natural resources trust fund. While it depends on a final formula, supporters hope there will be money for the WMAs, so they don’t have to rely primarily on competitive grants and fundraising.

Cara Morgan, coordinator of the East and West Nishnabotna watershed coalitions, formed in 2017 in southwestern Iowa, said the local voices brought together through the program allowed them to plan and explore solutions to a range of flooding problems.

“We really felt like we accomplished a lot,” Morgan said. “But we also have a lot to do and it shows in our watershed plan.”

Morgan pointed out that local governments and agencies offer volunteers to be their representatives in WMAs. But there is often turnover, and a dedicated coordinator always brings everything together. She noted that it is difficult to fund such positions without state support.

“A lot of grants are meant to fund specific projects, but not fund people to help or lead those projects,” Morgan pointed out.

Thank you for reading kmaland.com

At KMA, we try to be accurate in our reports. If you see a typo or mistake in a story, please email us at kmaradio@kmaland.com.

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Filling empty AI resource fund could help local flood work / Public News Service https://preservethenati.org/filling-empty-ai-resource-fund-could-help-local-flood-work-public-news-service/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 23:03:07 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/filling-empty-ai-resource-fund-could-help-local-flood-work-public-news-service/ A little-known Iowa program continues to pave the way for local coordination of flood prevention strategies, and proponents of the initiative point to an opportunity this year to increase funding. Watershed Management Authorities (WMAs) have been around for more than a decade, and proponents of the program hope lawmakers don’t rule out a funding provision […]]]>

A little-known Iowa program continues to pave the way for local coordination of flood prevention strategies, and proponents of the initiative point to an opportunity this year to increase funding.

Watershed Management Authorities (WMAs) have been around for more than a decade, and proponents of the program hope lawmakers don’t rule out a funding provision tied to the current Republican tax plan in the state Senate.

WMAs bring together cities, counties, and soil and water conservation districts to better manage flooding and other issues in a watershed.

Kate Hansen, policy associate at the Center for Rural Affairs, said these coalitions could do so much more with consistent support from the state.

“Agricultural practices or educational programs for watershed planning, staffing, there’s so much potential here,” Hansen said. “We would really like that element to stay in place.”

Income tax changes, which advocates for low-income Iowans oppose, are central to the Senate plan. He also calls for moving forward with a sales tax hike approved by voters several years ago for a natural resources trust fund. While it depends on a final formula, supporters hope there will be money for the WMAs, so they don’t have to rely primarily on competitive grants and fundraising.

Cara Morgan, coordinator of the East and West Nishnabotna watershed coalitions, formed in 2017 in southwestern Iowa, said the local voices brought together through the program allowed them to plan and explore solutions to a range of flooding problems.

“We really felt like we accomplished a lot,” Morgan said. “But we also have a lot to do and it shows in our watershed plan.”

Morgan pointed out that governments and local agencies offer volunteers to be their representatives in WMAs. But there is often turnover, and a dedicated coordinator always brings everything together. She noted that it is difficult to fund such positions without state support.

“A lot of grants are meant to fund specific projects, but not fund people to help or lead those projects,” Morgan pointed out.

Disclosure: The Center for Rural Affairs contributes to our fund for reporting on Policy and Budget Priorities, Environment, Hunger/Food/Nutrition, and Rural/Agriculture. If you would like to help support news in the public interest, click here.

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UW-Stevens Point to Host Natural Resources Lecture Series https://preservethenati.org/uw-stevens-point-to-host-natural-resources-lecture-series-2/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 22:15:00 +0000 https://preservethenati.org/uw-stevens-point-to-host-natural-resources-lecture-series-2/ STEVENS POINT — The University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources will address “History, Successes, and Challenges in Natural Resource Decision-Making” with a series of seven presentations beginning Feb. 16. The Spring 2022 Seminar Series is sponsored by the Wisconsin Center for Wildlife and CNR at UW-Stevens Point. It will be held throughout the […]]]>

STEVENS POINT — The University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point College of Natural Resources will address “History, Successes, and Challenges in Natural Resource Decision-Making” with a series of seven presentations beginning Feb. 16.

The Spring 2022 Seminar Series is sponsored by the Wisconsin Center for Wildlife and CNR at UW-Stevens Point. It will be held throughout the semester, with each presentation taking place from 4-5 p.m. select Wednesdays in room 170 of the Trainer Natural Resources building. Each will also be streamed live on CNR’s YouTube channel.

This seminar series highlights the roles of the legislature, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Wisconsin Conservation Congress, tribal government, non-governmental organizations, and citizens in making decisions affecting our natural resources in Wisconsin.

To learn more, visit www.uwsp.edu/cnr/WCW/Pages/2022-Seminar-Series.aspx.

The series includes:

  • February 16 – “How do we get back to the center?” Depolarizing talk on major wildlife issues,” Scott Walter, Kickapoo Valley Preserve Executive Director.
  • March 2 – “Wisconsin Water Quality Policy: How the Legislature Can Lead,” Katrina Shankland, State Representative, Wisconsin 71st Assembly District
  • March 16 – “Wisconsin Conservation Congress: Facilitating Public Participation,” Tony Blattler, Wisconsin Conservation Congress President
  • March 30 – “Citizen Involvement in Wisconsin Natural Resource Decision-Making,” Christine Thomas, Dean Emeritus and Professor Emeritus
  • April 6 – “The DNR’s Mission and What (Who) It Takes to Accomplish It,” Dan Baumann, Secretariat Director, West Central Unit, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources
  • April 20 – Title to be determined, Greg Kazmierski, President, Natural Resources Council
  • April 27 – TBA Title, Jon Greendeer, Former President, Ho-Chunk Nation

Source: UW-Stevens Point

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